Yuting Wang

Yuting Wang
American University of Sharjah | AUS · Department of International Studies

PhD in Sociology

About

20
Publications
5,764
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
98
Citations
Introduction
At the forefront of my research are questions concerning the processes of adaptation and identity construction of ethnic and/or religious minorities in the age of globalization. I have taught a wide range of courses including Introduction to Sociology, Religion and Society, Urban Sociology, Globalization, American Society, East Asian Societies, Introduction to Chinese Culture and Society, International Organization, etc.
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
August 2009 - present
American University of Sharjah
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Education
August 2003 - May 2009
University of Notre Dame
Field of study
  • Sociology

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
This forum is dedicated to exploring the notion of meaningfulness in design processes, taking the perspectives of community groups, nongovernmental organizations, and those who are marginalized in society as starting points. Authors will reflect conceptually and methodologically on practical engagements. --- Rosanna Bellini and Angelika Strohmayer,...
Article
This paper examines COVID-19 narratives of China as a form of soft power. The coronavirus pandemic and its handling have presented an image problem for China on the global stage. The country has struggled to control the narratives surrounding the pandemic. This article is interdisciplinary in nature with a focus on contemporary Chinese history, cul...
Article
Purpose This paper analyzes Fang Fang's 2020 Wuhan Diary‐Dispatches from a Quarantined City , to show how the author communicates the coronavirus crisis in Wuhan in a global information ecosystem. The success of the diary showcases how the actual health emergency has been transformed into a communication issue. Design/methodology/approach This stu...
Article
Purpose – This paper analyzes Fang Fang’s 2020 Wuhan Diary-Dispatches from a Quarantined City, to show how the author communicates the coronavirus crisis in Wuhan in a global information ecosystem. The success of the diary showcases how the actual health emergency has been transformed into a communication issue. Design/methodology/approach – This...
Book
Full-text available
Chinese in Dubai offers the first book-length study of the experiences of overseas Chinese living in the most prominent global city in the Arabian Gulf and the broader Middle East region. Evolving around three themes-money, pride, and spirituality, this book delineates the changing shape of Chinese spaces in metropolitan Dubai, explicates how a fro...
Article
This paper examines the spatial expansion of Chinese communities in the city of Dubai as the result of the strengthening economic ties between China and the Arab Gulf states over the last two decades and the diversification of economy in the Gulf region. Beginning with a brief account of the history of Chinese migration into the UAE, this paper ske...
Article
Since the beginning of the reform and opening up in China nearly four decades ago, China’s Muslim minorities have restored connections with the global Muslim ummah (community) through religious pilgrimages, business activities, and educational and cultural exchanges. Whether attracted by better economic prospects or for religious purposes, an incre...
Article
Driven by the need to survive in a predominately non-Muslim society, Chinese Muslims, or the Chinese-speaking Hui people, have traditionally played the role of a middleman minority. During the last few decades, benefiting from the strengthening economic ties between China and the Arab world, especially the Arabian Gulf countries, Hui Muslims have g...
Article
Full-text available
Based on three years of ethnographic fieldwork in a multi-ethnic immigrant Muslim congregation in a Midwestern city in the United States, this article scrutinizes the intricate process through which women use traditional gender roles and expectations to legitimate and operationalize women’s leadership. This study found that de facto congregationali...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid economic development in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has triggered innumerable changes in Emirati society. Changes occurring in the social institutions of marriage and family, which are central to Emirati society, reflect shifting attitudes toward traditional gender roles and gender relations that inform some of the essential norms and valu...
Chapter
Full-text available
Islam arrived in China with Arab and Persian caravans and travellers in the seventh century. As a gesture of hospitality, Tang Emperors granted the construction of great mosques. As more Muslims began to settle in China, small communities (fanfang) formed, centering on these mosques. These communities were given a great deal of autonomy to deal wit...
Book
Based on a three-year ethnographic study of a steadily growing suburban Muslim immigrant congregation in Midwest America, this book examines the micro-processes through which a group of Muslim immigrants from diverse backgrounds negotiate multiple identities while seeking to become part of American society in the years following 9/11. The author lo...
Article
Full-text available
Chinese Muslims are a religious minority in a non-Islamic society that has been undergoing rapid economic and social changes. In the emerging market economy of China, Muslims hold various attitudes toward business. Based on 53 in-depth interviews with Muslim businesspeople in the capital city of Beijing, Zhengzhou in Central China, and Guangzhou in...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on the conversion patterns of students and scholars from the People's Republic of China studying at United States universities. Based on in-depth interviews and observations conducted on university campuses in two midwestern cities, we examine the similarities and differences of conversion between the two Chinese student communit...

Network

Cited By