Yue Dou

Yue Dou
University of Twente | UT · Department of Natural Resources (NRS)

PhD

About

22
Publications
11,924
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489
Citations
Introduction
I conduct research in the fields of geospatial science and sustainability. I enjoy exploring feedbacks between human and natural systems, using agent-based modeling and empirical approaches, to estimate the impacts of land-use change, agricultural management practices, trade, and policy on livelihood resilience and environmental sustainability.
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - May 2016
University of Waterloo
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
Rural areas are increasingly subject to the effects of telecouplings (socioeconomic-environmental interactions over distances) whereby their human and natural dynamics are linked to socioeconomic and environmental drivers operating far away, such as the growing demand for labor and ecosystem services in cities. Although there have been many studies...
Article
Full-text available
Human–environment interactions within and across borders are now more influential than ever, posing unprecedented sustainability challenges. The framework of metacoupling (interactions within and across adjacent and distant coupled human–environment systems) provides a useful tool to evaluate them at diverse temporal and spatial scales. While most...
Article
Full-text available
Context While land use change is the main driver of biodiversity loss, most biodiversity assessments either ignore it or use a simple land cover representation. Land cover representations lack the representation of land use and landscape characteristics relevant to biodiversity modeling. Objectives We developed a comprehensive and high-resolution...
Article
Full-text available
Human and natural systems are more interconnected across distances than ever before [...]
Article
Globally, the number and extent of terrestrial protected areas (PAs) are expanding rapidly. Nonetheless, their impacts on preventing forest loss and the factors influencing the impacts are not well understood, despite the critical roles of forests in biodiversity conservation, provision of ecosystem services, and achievement of the United Nations’...
Article
Full-text available
Agricultural systems are heterogeneous across temporal and spatial scales. Although much research has investigated farm size and economic output, the synergies and trade-offs across various agricultural and socioeconomic variables are unclear. This study applies a GIS-based approach to official Brazilian census data (Agricultural Censuses of 1995,...
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Poverty alleviation for smallholders must consider the increasingly varied and intertwined impacts of climate change and globalization. This calls for a resilience perspective that includes eradication of poverty and resilience enhancement under extreme events and shocks. Applying the framework of development resilience, we constructed an agent-bas...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing connections and influences from near to far have changed social structures, access tonatural resources, and essential livelihoods of smallholders (i.e., those with incomes generated primarilyfrom natural resources on small rural properties). However, the potential benefits and negative impactsfrom these connections to smallholdersʹ livel...
Article
International agricultural trade has changed land uses in trading countries, altering global food security and environmental sustainability. Studies have concluded that local land-use drivers are largely from global sources (e.g., trade increases deforestation in exporting countries). However, little is known about how these local land-use changes...
Article
Land-use changes across distant places are increasingly affected by international agricultural trade, but most of the impacts and feedback remain unknown. The telecoupling framework-an analytical tool for examining socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances-can be used to conceptualize the impacts of agricultural trade on land-use...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas (PAs) are considered a cornerstone of biodiversity conservation, and the number and extent of PAs are expanding rapidly worldwide. While designating more land as PAs is important, concerns about the degree to which existing PAs are effective in meeting conservation goals are growing. Unfortunately, conservation effectiveness of PAs...
Article
The international trade of forestry and agricultural commodities leads distant regions across the globe to become connected through flows of products, information and capital. To deal with the sustainability and socioeconomic challenges of these interconnections, the ‘telecoupling’ conceptual framework has emerged. The telecoupling framework takes...
Article
Full-text available
In an increasingly interconnected world, human-environment interactions involving flows of people, organisms, goods, information, and energy are expanding in magnitude and extent, often over long distances. As a universal paradigm for examining these interactions, the telecoupling framework (published in 2013) has been broadly implemented across th...
Article
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Phenological changes in crops affect efficient agricultural production and can be used as important biological indicators of local and regional climate change. Although crop phenological changes and their responses to climate change, especially temperature, have been investigated, the impact of agronomic practice such as cultivar shifts and planted...
Article
Full-text available
Diverse conservation efforts have been expanding around the globe, even under the stress of increasing agricultural production. A striking example is the supply-chain agreements put upon the Amazon forest which had reduced deforestation by 80% from the early 2000s (27,772 km2) to 2015 (6207 km2). However, evaluation of these conservation efforts us...
Article
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We conducted a large household survey in a region of the Amazon estuary in Brazil to investigate the dependence of small farming households on government cash transfers and to identify the main factors that lead to better livelihood outcomes. The study examined the factors that contribute to heterogeneous household livelihoods and patterns of depen...
Article
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The global food market makes international players intrinsically connected through the flow of commodities, demand, production, and consumption. Local decisions, such as new economic policies or dietary shifts, can foster changes in coupled human–natural systems across long distances. Understanding the causes and effects of these changes is essenti...
Article
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The need for understanding the factors that trigger human responses to climate change has opened inquiries on the role of indigenous and local ecological knowledge (ILK) in facilitating or constraining social adaptation processes. Answers to the question of how ILK is helping or limiting smallholders to cope with increasing disturbances to the loca...
Article
Studies have shown that, city size and rank follow a Pareto distribution across countries and over time. However, inconsistent definitions and measurements of city size (e.g., urban population and urban area) in census data in China have hindered the retrieval of comparable Pareto coefficients over time. Additionally, abrupt changes in size and ran...
Article
Full-text available
35 surface soil samples and 28 profile soil samples were collected in Longitudinal Range-Gorge Region, Southwest China. The distribution of pollen and spores and their relationship with the environment are analyzed. The results show that there are significant differences in pollen and spores taxa, amounts, dominant taxa and florae between the easte...

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Projects (3)
Project
Postdoctoral Research: One of the greatest challenges the world faces is meeting growing demand for food while protecting the environment and the well-being of future generations. To meet this challenge, it is essential to address three fundamental issues. First, short-term food security (availability, affordability and quality) must not sacrifice the environment as the latter is the foundation for long-term food security. Second, food security is a global issue not just a national or regional issue. Third, food security and land use are inherently linked across multiple spatial, temporal, and organizational scales. Increasingly, land use is shaped by powerful new forces such as demand for food from distant places and nations capable of buying food to meet their food preferences. Reexamining food security and land-use dynamics in the context of distant interactions is crucial for enhancing global food security and environmental sustainability. This requires a better understanding of the complex interactions (e.g. feedbacks) among human and natural systems across a range of spatio-temporal scales. To address these challenging issues, a new systems integration framework will be used, named telecoupling: socioeconomic and environmental interactions between coupled human and natural systems (e.g., regions, nations) over distances and across scales. Understanding telecouplings can provide essential information for the formulation of policy for food security and environmental sustainability. To address these challenges and opportunities, we propose to establish an International Consortium on Food Security and Land Use in a Telecoupled World (i.e. the Telecoupling Consortium).