Youmna Atieh

Youmna Atieh
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center | MD Anderson · Department of Genetics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

40
Publications
2,860
Reads
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573
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2021 - present
Institut de Biologie du Développement de Marseille (IBDM)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2017 - January 2021
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2013 - September 2017
Institut Curie
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2013 - September 2017
Sorbonne Université
Field of study
  • Cell Biology
September 2011 - June 2013
Sorbonne Université
Field of study
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
October 2008 - June 2011
Lebanese University
Field of study
  • Biochemistry

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Full-text available
Cell elimination by extrusion is important for epithelial homeostasis, but knowing when and where cells will extrude has made in vivo studies difficult. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol for inducing cell extrusion from the larval zebrafish epidermis. We detail how to capture the dynamics of extrusion via time-lapse imaging and describe how...
Article
Full-text available
Extrusion is a mechanism used to eliminate unfit, excess, or dying cells from epithelial tissues. The initial events guiding which cells will be selectively extruded from the epithelium are not well understood. Here, we induced damage in a subset of epithelial cells in the developing zebrafish and used time-lapse imaging to examine cell and cytoske...
Article
Full-text available
Although fibroblast heterogeneity is recognized in primary tumors, both its characterization in and its impact on metastases remain unknown. Here, combining flow cytometry, immu-nohistochemistry and RNA-sequencing on breast cancer samples, we identify four Cancer-Associated Fibroblast (CAF) subpopulations in metastatic lymph nodes (LN). Two myofi-b...
Article
Epithelial wound healing requires a complex orchestration of cellular rearrangements and movements to restore tissue architecture and function after injury. While it is well-known that mechanical forces can affect tissue morphogenesis and patterning, how the biophysical cues generated after injury influence cellular behaviors during tissue repair i...
Article
Tumor initiation and growth is associated with significant changes in the surrounding tissue. During carcinoma progression, a global stiffening of the extracellular matrix is observed and is interpreted as a signature of aggressive invasive tumors. However, it is still unknown if this increase in matrix rigidity promotes invasion and whether this e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Epithelial wound healing requires a complex orchestration of cellular rearrangements and movements to restore tissue architecture and function after injury. While it is well-known that mechanical forces can affect tissue morphogenesis and patterning, how the biophysical cues generated after injury influence cellular behaviors during tissue repair i...
Article
Full-text available
In the original version of this Article, financial support and contributions in manuscript preparation were not fully acknowledged. The PDF and HTML versions of the Article have now been corrected to include the following: ‘M.P. and P.O. would like to thank Prof. Roderick Y.H. Lim for advice during manuscript preparation and for providing the labor...
Article
Full-text available
At the stage of carcinoma in situ, the basement membrane (BM) segregates tumor cells from the stroma. This barrier must be breached to allow dissemination of the tumor cells to adjacent tissues. Cancer cells can perforate the BM using proteolysis; however, whether stromal cells play a role in this process remains unknown. Here we show that an abund...
Article
Full-text available
Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the most abundant cells of the tumor stroma. Their capacity to contract the matrix and induce invasion of cancer cells has been well documented. However, it is not clear whether CAFs remodel the matrix by other means, such as degradation, matrix deposition, or stiffening. We now show that CAFs assemble fibro...
Thesis
Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are the most abundant cells of the tumor stroma. Their capacity to contract the matrix and induce invasion of cancer cells has been well-documented. However, it is not clear if CAFs remodel the matrix by other means (degradation, matrix deposition or stiffening). This project demonstrates that CAFs induce cancer...
Chapter
During tumor progression, cancer cells acquire the ability to escape the primary tumor and invade adjacent tissues. They migrate through the stroma to reach blood or lymphatics vessels that will allow them to disseminate throughout the body and form metastasis at distant organs. To assay invasion capacity of cells in vitro, multicellular spheroids...
Article
Full-text available
SHARPIN is a widely expressed multifunctional protein implicated in cancer, inflammation, linear ubiquitination and integrin activity inhibition; however, its contribution to epithelial homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here, we examined the role of SHARPIN in mammary gland development, a process strongly regulated by epithelial–stromal intera...

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