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Yoshimichi Murakami

Yoshimichi Murakami
Kobe University | Shindai · Research Institute for Economics and Business Administration

Ph.D in Economics

About

18
Publications
3,775
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41
Citations
Introduction
Yoshimichi Murakami is Assistant Professor at the Research Institute for Economics and Business Administration of Kobe University since March 2016. Previously, he was Associate Expert of the Latin American and Caribbean Institute for Economic and Social Planning (ILPES), United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC). He obtained his Ph.D. in Economics from Kobe University in 2013.
Additional affiliations
April 2017 - present
Kobe University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2017 - present
Otani University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • International Economics 1 International Economics 2
March 2016 - May 2017
Kobe University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
April 2010 - March 2013
Kobe University
Field of study
  • Graduate School of Economics
April 2004 - March 2007
The University of Tokyo
Field of study
  • Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Advanced Social and International Studies

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
Following a neo-structuralist perspective, this study presents a development puzzle for Latin American countries (LACs): a triangular relation amongst peripherality (increased terms-of-trade volatility and technological backwardness), income inequality, and per-capita income. We employ a simultaneous equation model using three-stage least squares (...
Article
This study analyzes the impacts of further tariff reductions resulting from the proliferation of regional trade agreements on wage inequality between skilled and unskilled workers in Chile in the 2000s. I match panel data on industry-level effective tariff rates and other industry variables calculated from plant-level microdata to pooled individual...
Preprint
Full-text available
This study analyzes the impacts of further tariff reductions resulting from the proliferation of regional trade agreements on wage inequality between skilled and unskilled workers in Chile in the 2000s. Thus, we use data on effective tariff rates instead of uniform most-favored-nation rates to measure trade liberalization. We match panel data on in...
Article
Information spillovers from multinational enterprises to local firms in developing countries are examined in the literature on global value chains and foreign direct investment. However, the both global value chain and foreign direct investment studies are carried out independently and separately. While global value chain studies describe an import...
Article
Purpose-This study aims to analyse the contribution of the expansion and diversification of higher education to Chile's increase in wage inequality from 1992 to 2000 and its subsequent decrease from 2000 to 2013. Design/methodology/approach-The wage equation for each year is estimated using data from the national household survey, Encuesta de Cara...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although Latin American countries (LACs) experienced an increase in income inequality after their integration into global economy in the1980s and 1990s, they experienced a decrease in income inequality in the 2000s. This study attempts to identify the channels through which globalization has affected the increase and decrease in income inequality i...
Article
This study empirically analyzes the direct impacts derived from the swift increase in exports to China (referred to as “the impact of China”) on the economic growth of three selected South American countries, Brazil, Chile, and Peru, during the commodity boom between 2001 and 2008. The results stemming from the balance-of-payments-constrained growt...
Preprint
Full-text available
Information spillovers from multinational enterprises to local firms in developing countries are examined in the literature on global value chains (GVCs) and foreign direct investment (FDI). However, both GVC and FDI studies are carried out independently and separately. On the one hand, GVC studies explore an important mechanism underlying the prod...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper uses the global value chain (GVC) approach to explore upgrading paths in the offshore services industry for Costa Rica. It seeks to identify the spillover effects of Costa Rica’s inward foreign direct investment (FDI) on domestic firms, analysing the country’s absorptive capacity, the development of technological capabilities and the exi...
Article
Full-text available
This study empirically analyzes whether trade liberalization increases wage in-equality between skilled and unskilled workers in Chile during 1974-2007. The findings show that tariff reductions contributed to increases in wage inequa-lity by causing price reductions of unskilled labor-intensive goods protected with the highest tariffs prior to trad...
Chapter
Full-text available
ABSTRACT. Japan—traditionally, the core economy of East Asia—has lost substantial weight in the global economy. However, the Japanese industry still has much growth potential if it innovates a strategy for globalization. In this regard, Latin America presents a fertile unexplored opportunity. From this viewpoint, we discuss some important features...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Japan—traditionally, the core economy of East Asia—has lost substantial weight in the global economy. However, the Japanese industry still has much growth potential if it innovates a strategy for globalization. In this regard, Latin America presents a fertile unexplored opportunity. From this viewpoint, we discuss some important features of regiona...
Book
Full-text available
Using the results of seven nationally and regionally representative household surveys, this study analyzes the impact of trade liberalization on wage inequality through a channel in which applied tariffs, owing to the preferential margin given under numerous preferential trade agreements, would affect industry wage premiums during the 1992–2006 per...
Thesis
Chile is the first of Latin American and Caribbean countries (henceforth, LACs) to convert development strategy from inward-looking development strategy to outward-looking one. Following the military coup d’état that overthrew Allende’s government in 1973, Chile introduced far-reaching economic liberalization including trade and financial liberaliz...

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Project (1)
Project
This study empirically analyses the direct impacts derived from the rapid increase in exports to China (referred to as ‘the impact of China’) on the economic growth of three selected South American countries, Brazil, Chile, and Peru, during the commodity boom between 2001 and 2008. The results of the balance of payments constrained (BPC) growth model show that the magnitude of the impact of China was less than 1%, although it ranged from the largest to the second largest impact among all trading partners for the three countries. In addition to the impact of China, Brazil and Peru also benefited from the increasing intra-regional exports among the Latin American countries (LACs) during the analysis period, unlike Chile. The estimated BPC growth rate of domestic income is smaller than the real growth rate of domestic income. This is because the growth rates of the export volumes were not sufficient even during the commodity boom, on account of the continued increasing trends of income elasticity of demand for imports. Furthermore, the income elasticities of demand for imports from China, whose shares in total imports are increasing, were especially high. Therefore, the three countries will continue to face further increase in the income elasticity of demand for imports as well as a stagnant growth rate of export volumes. Thus, the balance of payments position will continue to be the main growth constraint for these countries. In order to overcome this situation, there is a need to strengthen the promotion of regional integration among LACs as well as increase linkages between economic growth and intra-regional trade.