Yoshiharu Kobayashi

Yoshiharu Kobayashi
University of Leeds · School of Politics and International Studies

PhD

About

21
Publications
8,884
Reads
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491
Citations
Introduction
Yoshi Kobayashi is an Associate Professor at the School of Politics and International Studies, University of Leeds. His recent publications include ‘Populism and foreign aid’ (European Journal of International Relations), ‘Vaccine hesitancy, state bias, and Covid-19’ (Social Science & Medicine), ‘Public support for development aid during the COVID-19 pandemic.’ (World Development), and `How do people evaluate foreign aid to nasty regimes?' (British Journal of Political Science).
Additional affiliations
August 2013 - December 2017
Nazarbyaev University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Education
August 2007 - May 2013
Rice University
Field of study
  • International relations

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Pundits, development practitioners, and scholars worry that rising populism and international disengagement in developed countries have negative consequences on foreign aid. However, how populism and foreign aid go together is not well-understood. This paper provides the first systematic examination of this relationship. We adopt the popular ideati...
Article
Full-text available
Ending global poverty has been at the forefront of the development agenda since the 1970s, but many donors have failed to target their funds toward this goal. Activists have tackled this issue by appealing to donors' humanitarian motives, but we know little about what explains donors' decisions on how much to give to the poorest countries. Drawing...
Article
Background Past survey studies document that people strongly prefer Covid-19 vaccines developed domestically over those developed abroad. Available evidence suggests that this preference for domestic vaccines over foreign ones may stem from prejudice against foreign countries, but identifying prejudice-based vaccine preferences is difficult because...
Article
The dominant theoretical perspective guiding research on economic sanctions views sanctions as tools of bargaining. This implies that senders and targets are engaged in strategic interaction and that each is basing its decisions, in part, on its expectations regarding how its opponent will react. In this paper, we test a number of hypotheses derive...
Preprint
Full-text available
Publicity is central to our understanding of both terrorism and counterterrorism, but do people truly react to terrorism in a manner consistent with existing theories? Unlike previous attempts that rely on survey data or media coverage, we turn to global web-search data for observational and behavioral measures of public attention. Specifically, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Liberal governments around the world have taken unprecedented emergency measures in the fight against COVID-19. Concerns abound that these newly-authorized measures could fundamentally challenge core liberal values, but citizens strongly supported empowering their governments. How concerned are citizens about the potential entrenchment of these pow...
Preprint
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic unleashed a global crisis, leading governments to take unprecedented emergency measures in response to this crisis. Civil liberties that are often taken for granted and guaranteed in democracies, such as freedom of movement , freedom of assembly, and privacy, have been sacrificed for greater safety and security across democrat...
Article
Full-text available
Global pandemics are a serious concern for developing countries, perhaps particularly when the same pandemic also affects donors of development aid. During crises at home, donors often cut aid, which would have grave ramifications for developing countries with poor public health capacity during a time of increased demand for health care. Because th...
Article
Global pandemics are a serious concern for developing countries, perhaps particularly when the same pandemic also affects donors of development aid. During crises at home, donors often cut aid, which would have grave ramifications for developing countries with poor public health capacity during a time of increased demand for health care. Because th...
Article
Full-text available
There is an optimism that a growing number of women in political office will reorient the focus of international politics towards more social and humanitarian issues. One basis for this optimism are arguments that women legislators hold distinct foreign policy preferences and act on them to affect changes in policy. However, we know little about ge...
Article
Full-text available
Recent theories of foreign aid assume that moral motives drive voters’ preferences about foreign aid. However, little is known about how moral concerns interact with the widely accepted instrumental goals that aid serves. Moreover, what effects does this interplay have on preferences over policy actions? This article assesses these questions using...
Article
Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the post-Soviet space has seen regional integration in the framework of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS while moribund has affected migration in the post-Soviet space. Despite its persistence and effect on migration, few studies have sought to explore public perceptions towards the CIS....
Article
How do the human rights practices abroad affect decisions about the allocation of foreign aid? This article provides a new approach to this long-standing question. We bring donor government, donor citizens, and recipients’ attributes together in a single analytical framework. We argue that donor citizens are more self-serving than previously assume...
Chapter
Full-text available
Economic sanctions are an attempt by states to coerce a change in the policy of another state by restricting their economic relationship with the latter. Between, roughly, the 1960s–1980s, the question dominating the study of sanctions was whether they are an effective tool of foreign policy. Since the 1990s, however, with the introduction of large...
Article
Recent research disputes the conventional wisdom that “sanctions do not work.” It demonstrates that states may impose sanctions for purposes beyond seeking an immediate change in the behavior of targeted regimes. For example, democratic leaders often impose sanctions to satisfy their own domestic constituencies. However, we know little about how th...
Article
Full-text available
Economic crises generally lead to reductions in foreign aid. However, the widely held view that budgetary constraints caused by economic crises reduce aid is inaccurate because donor government outlays actually tend to increase. We develop an argument that aid cuts occur because voters place a lower priority on aid during economic downturns and pol...
Article
Recent research on economic sanctions has produced significant advances in our theoretical and empirical understanding of the causes and effects of these phenomena. Our theoretical understanding, which has been guided by empirical findings, has reached the point where existing datasets are no longer adequate to test important hypotheses. This artic...
Article
Full-text available
In the literature on sanctions effectiveness, scholars have identified a number of factors that may contribute to sanctions success. However, existing empirical studies provide mixed findings concerning the effects of these factors. This research note explores two possible reasons for this lack of consistency in the literature. First, informed by t...

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