Yoshifumi Miyazaki

Yoshifumi Miyazaki
Chiba University · Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences

PhD

About

188
Publications
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8,544
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - November 2019
Chiba University
Position
  • Fellow

Publications

Publications (188)
Article
This study aimed to demonstrate the effects of forest-derived visual, auditory, and combined stimulation on brain activity, autonomic nervous system activity, and subjective spatial impressions. The participants included 20 Japanese female university students (age 22.1 ± 1.8 years). Each participant viewed a gray image for 60 s with no sound (rest...
Article
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It has been recently suggested that contact with nature improves mood via reducing the activity of the prefrontal cortex. However, the specific regions within the prefrontal cortex that underlie this effect remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the specific regions involved in the mood-improving effect of viewing images of nature usin...
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In Japanese households, it is customary to walk barefoot on wood floors. This study sought to clarify the physiological effects produced via tactile application of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) to the sole of the feet, using the brain and autonomic nervous activities as indicators. Twenty-seven female university students (mean age, 21.9 ± 1.9 years)...
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Wood is a sustainable and natural material used in interior design for living environment. Knots are prominent features on wood surfaces, and they affect a user’s building preference and impression. Data on the effects of wood knots on human physiological responses are limited. Hence, further studies should be conducted. This study examined the eff...
Article
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The impact on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) of both walking in forest environments and viewing forest landscapes has already been demonstrated in previous research conducted by the authors of this paper. In both walking and viewing, decreases in tension-anxiety (T-A), depression-dejection (D), anger-hostility (A-H), fatigue (F), and confusion (...
Article
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Type A personality Semantic differential method Profile of mood states Kwansei gakuin (KG) daily life questionnaire A B S T R A C T Studies on the psychological effects of nature have been increasing, but few studies have focused on individual differences in these effects. The purpose of this study was to examine the individual differences in the p...
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Benefits related to health promotion by getting closer to forests have received increasing attention in modern stressful society; however, evidence-based research about how our brain activity changes when we stay in a forest environment is limited. Thus, the goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of viewing real forest landscapes on the a...
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The aim of this study was to validate the psychological advantages of viewing forest landscapes. Moreover, the associations between trait anxiety levels and psychological responses were evaluated. A total of 650 university male students (age, 21.7 ± 1.6 years) viewed a scenery in a forested area and an urban area for 15 min. Furthermore, the Profil...
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The number of people addicted to gambling has increased worldwide. They often suffer from debilitating medical conditions associated with stress or depression. This study examined the physiological and psychological reactions of gambling disorder (GD) patients while listening to high-definition forest or city sounds using headphones. In total, 12 J...
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Population growth and increased stress caused by urbanization have led to social problems that are predicted to intensify in the future. In these conditions, the recently established ”nature therapy” has revealed that an environment rich in various plant life significantly contributes to the relief of physical and mental stress. Meanwhile, from the...
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The authors wish to add the following corrections to their paper published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [1] [...]
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We investigated the effects of walking in a forest environment on salivary cortisol concentrations. Seventy-four young male participants walked for 15 min in forested and urban environments, and saliva was collected before and after walking. Our previous study reported salivary cortisol concentrations after walking only. This study was aimed at cla...
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The authors wish to add the following corrections to their paper published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [...].
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After the article was published, an error was found in Fig. 2. The following change should be made to the figure in the published article. The change does not affect the conclusions of the article in any way.
Article
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Wood is used as an interior material in Japan, and it is empirically known that contact with wood induces relaxation in humans. However, evidential data regarding these physiological effects are lacking. In this study, we examined the physiological effects of tactile stimulation based on measurements of brain and autonomic nervous activities by usi...
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Contact with nature has been proposed as a solution to achieve physiological relaxation and stress recovery, and a number of scientific verification outcomes have been shown. Compared with studies of the other senses, studies investigating the visual effects of nature have been at the forefront of this research field. A variety of physiological ind...
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Wood is a raw material that is used not only in the production of structural members for various buildings, but also in the interior finishes that are directly seen and touched by the occupants. Wood has also been recognized as a human-friendly material, but few studies have experimentally confirmed the physiological benefits it brings to humans. T...
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The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological effects on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity of forest-related visual, olfactory, and combined visual and olfactory stimuli. Twenty-one female Japanese university students (age, 21.1 ± 1.0 years) participated. In a soundproofed chamber with an artificial climate, each participan...
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The effects of forest activities on health promotion have received increasing attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological and psychological effects of brief walks in forests on young women. The experiments were conducted in 6 forests (test) and 6 city areas (control). Overall, 12 participants in each area (60 participants in...
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This study aimed to clarify the psychological benefits of brief walks through forest areas. In addition, we aimed to examine the associations between psychological responses and trait anxiety levels. Five-hundred-and-eighty-five participants (mean age, 21.7 ± 1.6 years) were instructed to walk predetermined courses through forest (test) and city (c...
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The benefits of various nature-derived stimuli that can be used for stress relief and relaxation has recently gained immense attention; however, there are very few studies about their influence on elderly patients. The present study aims to present the effects of viewing bonsai on autonomic nervous activity, prefrontal cortex activity, and subjecti...
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The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of walking in forest environments on autonomic nervous activity with special reference to its distribution characteristics. Heart rate variability (HRV) of 485 male participants while walking for ∼15 min in a forest and an urban area was analyzed. The experimental sites were 57 forests and 57 urban are...
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We clarified the physiological effects of tactile stimulation of the soles of the feet with the wood of the Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) based on measurements of prefrontal cortex and autonomic nervous activities. Nineteen female university-attending students (age: 21.2 ± 0.3 years) were included. Oxy-hemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentrations in...
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This study was aimed to clarify the physiological effects of visual stimulation using forest imagery on activity of the brain and autonomic nervous system. Seventeen female university students (mean age, 21.1 ± 1.0 years) participated in the study. As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentrations were measured in the left an...
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This study aimed to clarify the physiological effects of touching hinoki cypress (hereinafter called “hinoki”) (Chamaecyparis obtusa) wood with the palm of the right hand on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Twenty-two female university students (mean age 21.1 ± 0.2 years) participated in the study. As an indicator of brain activity, o...
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Objectives The present study aimed to clarify the effects of viewing fresh roses on prefrontal cortex activity, autonomic nervous activity and subjective assessments of psychological relaxation. Design A crossover design, in which each experimental group crosses over from one treatment to another, was used. Setting and interventions : A total of...
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The objective of this study was to compare physiological and psychological relaxation by assessing heart rate variability (HRV), prefrontal cortex activity, and subjective indexes while subjects performed a task with and without foliage plants. In a crossover experimental design, 24 university students performed a task transferring pots with and wi...
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Nature therapy has been demonstrated to induce physiological relaxation. The psychophysiological effects of nature therapy (stimulation with bonsai trees) on adult male patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) were examined. Oxyhemoglobin concentration changes in the prefrontal cortex were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy, and heart rate var...
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We examined the sustained effects of a forest therapy program on the blood pressure of office workers. Twenty-six office workers (mean age ± standard deviation, 35.7 ± 11.1 years) participated in a 1-day forest therapy program. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate were used as measurement indices. The evaluations were performed thre...
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Salivary cortisol and secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) are important biomarkers for environmental and public health research. The present study investigated the diurnal variations of these salivary biomarkers, with a focus on the change of distribution characteristics (i.e., skewness and kurtosis) of the concentrations. The participants in this s...
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a forest environment on salivary cortisol concentration, particularly on the characteristics of its distribution. The participants were 348 young male subjects. The experimental sites were 34 forests and 34 urban areas across Japan. The subjects viewed the landscape (forest or urban environmen...
Article
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This study aimed to clarify the physiological effects of touching wood with the palm, in comparison with touching other materials on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Eighteen female university students (mean age, 21.7 ± 1.6 years) participated in the study. As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentrations were...
Article
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This study examined the physiological effects of touching wood with various coating with the palm of the hand on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Participants were 18 female university students (mean age, 21.7 ± 1.6 years). As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin concentrations were measured in the left and right prefrontal c...
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It is empirically known that wood can cause a comfort enhancement effect in humans. On the other hand, not enough scientific knowledge based on evidence-based research is available on this subject. However, data using physiological indices have increasingly accumulated in recent years. This review provides an overview of the current situation for p...
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With increasing attention on the health benefits of a forest environment, evidence-based research is required. This study aims to provide scientific evidence concerning the physiological and psychological effects of exposure to the forest environment on middle-aged hypertensive men. Twenty participants (58.0 ± 10.6 years) were instructed to sit on...
Article
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The study’s objective was to investigate the effects of foliage plants on prefrontal cortex activity and subjective assessments of psychological relaxation. In a crossover experimental design, 24 male university students in their 20s observed a containerwith and without foliage plants for 3 minutes while oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) concentration in the...
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Humans have evolved into what they are today after the passage of 6-7 million years. If we define the beginning of urbanization as the rise of the industrial revolution, less than 0.01% of our species’ history has been spent in modern surroundings. Humans have spent over 99.99% of their time living in the natural environment. The gap between the na...
Chapter
There is a significant positive relationship between exposure to forest environment and physical and mental health, although individual differences exist within these responses; this phenomenon has raised questions in various fields. Here we show that the psychological effect of a forest environment can differ depending on a subject’s initial value...
Article
Full-text available
Salivary cortisol has been used in various fields of science as a non-invasive biomarker of stress levels. This study offers the normative reference values of cortisol measurement for healthy young males. Salivary cortisol levels were measured in 267 healthy young males (age: 21.7 ± 1.5 years) in the early morning on two consecutive days and were a...
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The natural environment is increasingly recognized as an effective counter to urban stress, and "Forest Therapy" has recently attracted attention as a relaxation and stress management activity with demonstrated clinical efficacy. The present study assessed the physiological and psychological effects of a forest therapy program on middle-aged female...
Article
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Background In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the physiological effects of nature-derived stimulation. The physiological relaxation effects caused by forest-derived olfactory stimuli have been demonstrated. However, there are no studies on the physiological effects of olfactory stimuli by Hinoki cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) le...
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In recent times, attention has been focused on the role of urban green spaces in promoting human health and well-being. However, there is a lack of evidence-based research on the physiological effects of walking in urban green areas. This study aimed to clarify the physiological and psychological effects of walking in urban parks during fall. Twent...
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Autonomic responses to urban and forest environments were studied in 625 young male subjects. The experimental sites were 57 forests and 57 urban areas across Japan. The subjects viewed the landscape (forest or urban environment) for a period of 15 min while sitting on a chair. During this period, heart rate variability (HRV) was monitored continuo...
Article
To examine the psychological effects of forest therapy program on workers. The subjective symptoms index, a shortened version of the profile of mood states (POMS), and a semantic differential (SD) method were used to measure the psychological effects. The evaluations were performed 3 days before, during, and 1, 3, and 5 days after the forest therap...
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The physiological and psychological relaxation effects of viewing a kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa 'Hayward') orchard landscape were investigated. Seventeen Japanese adult females (46.1 ± 8.2 years) viewed a kiwifruit orchard landscape or a building site (control) for 10 min. The heart rate variability and heart rate were determined. The modified s...
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Developments in information technology cause a great deal of stress to modern people, and controlling this stress now becomes an important issue. The aim of this study was to examine psychological and physiological benefits of interaction with indoor plants. The study subjects were 24 young male adults at the age of 24.9 ± 2.1 (mean ± SD). The cros...
Article
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There is a significant positive relationship between exposure to forest environments and physical and mental health. However, there are individual differences within these responses, and this phenomenon has posed questions in various fields. Here, we show that the physiological effect of a forest environment can differ depending on a subject's init...
Article
The aim of this study was to clarify the physiological and psychological effects of walking around and viewing a lake in a forest environment. The subjects included 11 male Japanese university students (age: 22.0?1.2 years) who were randomly assigned to visit either a forest or an urban (control) setting. They were instructed to walk a predetermine...
Article
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There has been increasing attention on the therapeutic effects of the forest environment. However, evidence-based research that clarifies the physiological effects of the forest environment on hypertensive individuals is lacking. This study provides scientific evidence suggesting that a brief forest walk affects autonomic nervous system activity in...
Article
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The relaxation effects of gardening have attracted attention; however, very few studies have researched its physiological effects on humans. This study aimed to clarify the physiological and psychological effects on high school students of viewing real and artificial pansies. Forty high school students (male: 19, female: 21) at Chiba Prefectural Ka...
Article
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Time spent walking and relaxing in a forest environment ("forest bathing" or "forest therapy") has well demonstrated anti-stress effects in healthy adults, but benefits for ill or at-risk populations have not been reported. The present study assessed the physiological and psychological effects of forest therapy (relaxation and stress management act...
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Despite an increasing attention and public preference for rural amenities, little evidence is available on the health benefits of a rural environment. In this study, we identified physiological and psychological benefits of exposure to a rural environment using multiparametric methods. Twelve young male adults participated in a 3-day field experime...
Article
Objectives People have been aware of essential oils, which are derived from plants, for a long time. Recently, we have become interested in physiological and subjective effects of daily exposure to essential oils. The primary aim of the present study was to clarify effects of olfactory stimulation with rose or orange oil on prefrontal cortex activi...
Technical Report
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This paper summarizes the discussions from the Natural Environments Initiative meeting hosted by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Center for Global Health and the Environment and the Harvard Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies in October 2013. It presents ongoing worldwide research on health benefits stemming from exposure to natural envi...
Article
This study was conducted to clarify the physiological and psychological effects of the odor of orange essential oil in humans. Thirteen healthy male university students (mean age 23.0±1.1 years) participated. The study was conducted in an artificial climate chamber with temperature 24°C, relative humidity 50%, and illumination 50 lux. The subjects...
Article
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With lifestyles in modern society becoming increasingly stressful, there is growing interest in the physiological relaxing effects of the natural environment. Particular interest has been paid to the physiological effects of indoor plants, however, no studies have revealed the effects of such visual stimulation on minors. In this study 85 (41 male...
Article
Empirical evidence suggests that three-dimensional (3D) images of nature promote physiological relaxation in humans by providing more realistic effects compared with two-dimensional (2D) images. However, no studies have evaluated the physiological relaxation effects of nature-derived 3D images on prefrontal cortex and autonomic nerve activity. The...
Article
Objective: To clarify the effect of olfactory stimulation by fresh rose flowers, which exude a strong fragrance, on heart rate variability. Settings: A chamber with an artificial climate maintained at 25°C with 50% relative humidity and 230 lux illumination at the Center for Environment, Health, and Field Sciences, Chiba University, Japan. Part...