Yogesh Chukewad

Yogesh Chukewad
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Department of Mechanical Engineering

PhD

About

13
Publications
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139
Citations

Publications

Publications (13)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To date, controlled flight of very small, insect-sized (∼100 mg) Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) has required off-board sensors and computation. Achieving autonomy in more general environments that do not have such resources available will require integrating these components. In this work we present advances toward this goal by demonstrating a new, c...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Efforts to engineer insect-sized (∼100 mg) robots are motivated by their potential advantages relative to larger robots, such as greater deployment numbers at the same cost. Previous iterations have demonstrated controlled flight, but were limited in terms of locomotion capabilities outside of flight. They also consisted of many parts, making them...
Preprint
Full-text available
Interest in flying insect-sized robots is driven by their advantages over larger robots. Their small size and low weight allow for larger deployment numbers for greater coverage at the same cost. Flapping wings represent one means for generating lift, but this requires a complex and failure-prone mechanism. A simpler alternative is electrohydrodyna...
Preprint
Aerial robots the size of a honeybee (~100 mg) have advantages over larger robots because of their small size, low mass and low materials cost. Previous iterations have demonstrated controlled flight but were difficult to fabricate because they consisted of many separate parts assembled together. They also were unable to perform locomotion modes be...
Article
Insect-sized ( $\sim$ 100 mg) aerial robots have advantages over larger robots because of their small size, low weight, and low materials cost. Previous iterations have demonstrated controlled flight but were difficult to fabricate because they consisted of many separate parts assembled together and were also unable to perform locomotion modes bes...
Article
Flapping-wing insect-scale robots ( $< $ 500 mg) rely on small changes in drive signals supplied to actuators to generate angular torques. Previous results on vehicles with passive wing hinges have demonstrated roll, pitch, and position control, but they have not yet been able to control their yaw (heading) angle while hovering. To actuate yaw, th...
Article
Full-text available
To date, insect scale robots capable of controlled flight have used flapping-wings for generating lift, but this requires a complex and failure-prone mechanism. A simpler alternative is electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thrust, which requires no moving mechanical parts. In EHD, corona discharge generates a flow of ions in an electric field between two elec...
Article
Successful demonstrations of controlled flight in flying insect-sized robots (FIRs) $< 500 \text{mg}$ have all relied on piezo-actuated flapping wings because of unfavorable downward size scaling in motor-driven propellers. In practice, the mechanical complexity of flapping wings typically results in large torque bias variability about pitch and...
Conference Paper
Many fields of active research such as biomedical engineering, electronics, and optics have need of small metallic parts less than 1mm in size, with features measured in hundreds or tens of microns, with tolerances as small as 0.1 micron. Such parts include devices for studying the processes in the human body, devices that can be implanted in the h...

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Projects (2)