Yoella Bereby-Meyer

Yoella Bereby-Meyer
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev | bgu · Department of Psychology

Ph.D.

About

67
Publications
29,483
Reads
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2,070
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
1244 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - July 2015
Harvard University
Position
  • Research Associate
October 1998 - present
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (67)
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic caused drastic social changes for many people, including separation from friends and coworkers, enforced close contact with family, and reductions in mobility. Here we assess the extent to which people's evolutionarily-relevant basic motivations and goals—fundamental social motives such as Affiliation and Kin Care—might have b...
Article
Full-text available
How does psychology vary across human societies? The fundamental social motives framework adopts an evolutionary approach to capture the broad range of human social goals within a taxonomy of ancestrally recurring threats and opportunities. These motives—self-protection, disease avoidance, affiliation, status, mate acquisition, mate retention, and...
Article
In selection decisions, decision makers often struggle to ignore irrelevant information, such as candidates' age, gender and attractiveness, which can lead to suboptimal decisions. One way to correct the effects of these irrelevant attributes is to consider them as suppressor variables, and penalize individuals who unjustifiably benefit from them....
Article
We examined the development of children's self-evaluation of their prosociality in normative social comparisons (with an average peer). Results suggest that when comparing themselves with an average other in the abstract (i.e., without reference to actual behavior), elementary school children (aged 6-12 years) demonstrated the better than average (...
Article
Full-text available
In 2020, most countries around the world adopted various measures aimed at combating the coronavirus (i.e., COVID-19), or reducing risky behavior which may spread the virus. In the current study (N = 215), we examined compliance with COVID-19 prevention guidelines using a risk-taking perspective, differentiating active from passive risk taking. In...
Article
When allocating resources, people often have to resolve a conflict between equity and efficiency concerns. That is, sometimes for everyone to receive the same amount of resources, some resources must be used suboptimally. However, it is unclear whether and how people account for the impact their allocation decisions would have on the recipients' ou...
Article
Vulnerabilities to online cyber-related crime are typically the result of poor decisions on the part of users. To date, research on risk-taking behavior applied to cyber-security situations has concentrated mainly on the risks that stem from active behavioral choices (e.g., opening an attachment from an unknown sender). However, risk may result fro...
Article
Vulnerabilities to online cyber-related crime are typically the result of poor decisions on the part of users. To date, research on risk-taking behavior applied to cyber-security situations has concentrated mainly on the risks that stem from active behavioral choices (e.g., opening an attachment from an unknown sender). However, risk may result fro...
Article
Choosing between candidates for a position can be tricky, especially when the selection test is affected by irrelevant characteristics (e.g., reading speed). One can correct for this irrelevant attribute by penalizing individuals who have unjustifiably benefited from it. Statistical models do so by including the irrelevant attribute as a suppressor...
Article
Full-text available
Is self-serving lying intuitive? Or does honesty come naturally? Many experiments have manipulated reliance on intuition in behavioral-dishonesty tasks, with mixed results. We present two meta-analyses (with evidential value) testing whether an intuitive mind-set affects the proportion of liars ( k = 73; n = 12,711) and the magnitude of lying ( k =...
Article
Theories of dishonest behavior implicitly assume language independence. Here, we investigated this assumption by comparing lying by people using a foreign language versus their native tongue. Participants rolled a die and were paid according to the outcome they reported. Because the outcome was private, they could lie to inflate their profit withou...
Article
Full-text available
Lying typically requires greater mental effort than telling the truth. Imposing cognitive load may improve lie detection by limiting the cognitive resources needed to lie effectively, thereby increasing the difference in speed between truths and lies. We test this hypothesis meta-analytically. Across 21 studies using response-time (RT) paradigms (1...
Chapter
Full-text available
Equity, or the idea that one should be compensated according to one’s respective contribution, is a fundamental principle for resource allocation. People tend to endorse equity in a wide range of contexts, from interpersonal relationships to public policy. However, at times, equity might come at the expense of efficiency. What do people do when the...
Article
Full-text available
Not getting vaccinated or not backing up computer files are examples of passive risk taking: risk brought on or magnified by inaction. We suggest the difficulty in paying attention to absences, together with the reduced agency and responsibility that is associated with passive choices, leads to the perception of passive risks as being less risky th...
Article
Full-text available
When allocating resources, equity and efficiency may conflict. When resources are scarce and cannot be distributed equally, one may choose to destroy resources and reduce societal welfare to maintain equity among its members. We examined whether people are averse to inequitable outcomes per se or to being responsible for deciding how inequity shoul...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Cross-cultural tests from 16 nations were performed to evaluate the hypothesis that the emotion of pride evolved to guide behavior to elicit valuation and respect from others. Ancestrally, enhanced evaluations would have led to increased assistance and deference from others. To incline choice, the pride system must compute for a potent...
Poster
Full-text available
Unconscious-thought-theory asserts that complex choices are better following unconscious thought. Examining the role of interest, we found that for interesting matters, people prefer to engage with conscious rather than unconscious thought (Experiment 1), and in line with this preference, the former leads to better choices (Experiments 2-3).
Article
Full-text available
Cheating for material gain is a destructive phenomenon in any society. We examine the extent to which people care about the victims of their unethical behavior—be they a group of people or an individual—and whether they are sensitive to the degree of harm or cost that they cause to these victims. The results of three studies suggest that when a gro...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we tested the proposal that the Stroop task involves two conflicts-task conflict and informational conflict. Task conflict was defined as the latency difference between color words and non-letter neutrals, and manipulated by varying the proportion of color words versus non-letter neutrals. Informational conflict was defined as the la...
Article
In social dilemmas, broad collective interests conflict with immediate self-interests. In two studies, we examine the role of pride in guiding cooperative behavior in a social dilemma. We find that the consideration of pride led to more cooperation compared to the consideration of joy or a control condition (Study 1) and compared to the considerati...
Article
Full-text available
Learning takes time, namely, one needs to be exposed to contingency relations between stimulus dimensions in order to learn, whereas intentional control can be recruited through task demands. Therefore showing that control can be recruited as a function of experimental instructions alone, that is, adapting the processing according to the instructio...
Article
Full-text available
Are people honest about the extent to which they engage in unethical behaviors? We report an experiment examining the relation between self-reported risky unethical tendencies and actual dishonest behavior. Participants' self-reported risk taking tendencies were assessed using the Domain-Specific Risk-Taking (DOSPERT) questionnaire, while actual se...
Article
The current research examines tacit coordination behavior in a lottery selection task. Two hundred participants in each of three experiments and 100 in a fourth choose to participate in one of two lotteries, where one lottery has a larger prize than the other. Independent of variations in the complexity of the mechanism of prize allocation, the pri...
Article
Standard economic models assume people exclusively pursue material self-interests in social interactions. However, people exhibit social preferences; that is, they base their choices partly on the outcomes others obtained in a social interaction. People care about fairness, and reciprocity affects behavior. This study examines the differences in ne...
Article
We conducted an experiment to obtain objective measures of responses to binary alerts and subjective reports of the effects of alerts. We focused on the effects of the diagnostic value of the alert. Alerts helped improve performance, and participants responded more strongly and faster to alerts with higher diagnostic value. However, they did not re...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of reciprocity in many areas of social life, little is known about possible factors affecting it and its interplay with the self-interest motive to maximize one's own gains. In this study, we examined the role of cognitive control in reciprocal behavior to determine whether it is a deliberate and controlled act or whether the...
Article
Full-text available
Choosing a major field of study to secure a good job after graduation is a tacit coordination problem that requires considering others' choices. We examine how feeling skillful, either induced (Experiment 1) or measured (Experiment 2), affects coordination in this type of task. In both experiments participants chose between two lotteries, one offer...
Article
Full-text available
In the ultimatum-game, as in many real-life social exchange situations, the selfish motive to maximize own gains conflicts with fairness preferences. In the present study we manipulated the availability of cognitive-control resources for ultimatum-game proposers to test whether preference for fairness is a deliberative cognitive-controlled act or a...
Article
Full-text available
While risk research focuses on actions that put people at risk, this paper introduces the concept of "passive risk"- risk brought on or magnified by inaction. We developed a scale measuring personal tendency for passive risk taking (PRT), validated it using a 150 undergraduate student sample, and obtained three factors indicating separate domains o...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research suggests that refraining from cheating in tempting situations requires self-control, which indicates that serving self-interest is an automatic tendency. However, evidence also suggests that people cheat to the extent that they can justify their unethical behavior to themselves. To merge these different lines of research, we adopted...
Article
Full-text available
In configuration problems, such as the construction of a weekly study schedule, decision makers must assemble a combination of parts under a set of constraints. Interactions may be present between the parts, and more than a single objective function may exist, such as minimizing the number of days on campus and maximizing the interest level of the...
Article
In configuration problems, such as the construction of a weekly study schedule, decision makers must assemble a combination of parts under a set of constraints. Interactions may be present between the parts, and more than a single objective function may exist, such as minimizing the number of days on campus and maximizing the interest level of the...
Article
Guala points to a discrepancy between strong negative reciprocity observed in the lab and the way cooperation is sustained "in the wild." This commentary suggests that in lab experiments, strong negative reciprocity is limited when uncertainty exists regarding the players' actions and the intentions. Thus, costly punishment is indeed a limited mech...
Article
The ultimatum game models social exchange in situations in which the rational motive to maximize gains conflicts with fairness considerations. Using two independent behavioral measurements, the authors tested two contradicting predictions: that the preference for fairness is a deliberative cognitive-controlled act or that it is an automatic act. In...
Article
The current research examines the effect of feeling skillful on tacit coordination behavior in a lottery selection task. In two experiments participants were asked to choose between one of two lotteries, where one lottery had a larger prize than the other. We manipulated the relevance of skill and examined how one’s feelings of skillfulness affect...
Article
This study examines whether cognitive-processing costs induce adaptive pre-decisional information search in children aged 7-8. Children aged 7-8 and 11-12 asked questions about objects kept in sealed boxes for the purpose of subsequent choice. Availability of a memory aid that recorded acquired information and choice set size were manipulated indep...
Article
In this study, we examine the effects of achievement motivational goals (Learning vs. Performance) and of debriefing on the ability of trainees to acquire integrative (i.e., value-creating) negotiation skills and to effectively transfer these skills across situations. Participants in four between-subject conditions: 2 motivational goal conditions (...
Article
Though negotiation scholars have generally recommended that negotiators suppress their expressions of emotion, extant research has pointed to the expression of emotions as a powerful strategy in negotiations. For example, Ho and Andrade (2010) suggest that people tend to use the expression of emotions to their advantage in one-shot games and are fu...
Article
Standard economic models assume that people exclusively pursue material self-interests in social interactions. However, fairness considerations and factors such as trust and reciprocity affect behavior. This study examined whether negative reciprocity (punishment for unfair divisions) develops during childhood. Kindergarteners (five-years old), sec...
Article
The present research adapts analogical training to teach negotiators broad concepts of creating value. Recent research has shown specific analogical training, wherein negotiators draw analogies between different cases involving the same strategy, to be effective for learning and transferring specific value-creating strategies. The current results e...
Article
The winner's curse phenomenon refers to the fact that the winner in a common value auction, in order to actually win the auction, is likely to have overestimated the item's value and consequently is likely to gain less than expected and may even lose (i.e., it is said to be “cursed”). Past research, using the “Acquiring a company” task has shown th...
Article
We set out to find ways to help decision makers overcome the “winner’s curse,” a phenomenon commonly observed in asymmetric information bargaining situations, and instead found strong support for its robustness. In a series of manipulations of the “Acquiring a Company Task,” we tried to enhance decision makers’ cognitive understanding of the task....
Article
In an experiment, players’ ability to learn to cooperate in the repeated prisoner’s dilemma was substantially diminished when the payoffs were noisy, even though players could monitor one another's past actions perfectly. In contrast, in one-time play against a succession of opponents, noisy payoffs increased cooperation, by slowing the rate at whi...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested the hypothesis that interest in a certain topic enables children to sustain their intrinsic motivation in topic-related tasks when positive feedback is absent. Ninety-one Israeli children in the seventh grade completed a questionnaire assessing their interest in the topic of logic questions. Later, in individual sessions, children...
Article
The present research deals with teaching negotiators to improve their skills for creating value. Building upon the literature in cognitive and educational psychology, we examined the effects of reflection and of achievement motivational goals (Learning versus Performance) on the transfer of integrative negotiation skills. Participants first engaged...
Article
The present research adapts analogical training to teach negotiators broad thought processes for creating value. Recently, specific analogical training, wherein negotiators draw analogies between different cases involving the same strategy, was shown to be effective for learning and transferring specific value-creating strategies. The current resul...
Article
We consider new three player games to test existing models of fairness. Our games consist of a proposer who offers an allocation of $10 between two players, either himself and the responder or the responder and a third party. In each case, the responder either accepts or rejects this allocation. In case of a rejection, the player who was not part o...
Article
In customer or labor markets raising prices or cutting wages is perceived as unfair if it results from the exploitation of shifts in demands. In a series of manipulations we show that adding an alternative to the original choice set alters the perception of fairness of the final outcome. Adding a worse alternative lowers the perception of unfairnes...
Article
This paper attacks one of the chief limitations of the field of behavioral decision research—the past inability to use this literature to improve decision making. Building on the work of Thompson, Gentner, Loewenstein and colleagues (Loewenstein, Thompson, & Gentner, 1999; Thompson, Gentner, & Loewenstein, 2000; Gentner & Markman, 1997), the curren...
Article
Full-text available
Two experiments examined the effect of age and cognitive demands on children’s choice strategies. Children aged 8–9 and 12–13 years were asked to choose among either two or four products that differed in several attributes of varying importance to them. Choice tasks were designed to differentiate between the lexicographic and the equal-weighting st...
Article
The current study deals with the ability of teams to learn and transfer complex knowledge across situations and therefore achieve better long term performance. In an experiment on integrative (value-creating) negotiations, High Learning Teams (with learning goals, high learning values, and team discussions) and Low Learning Teams (with performance...
Article
We set out to find ways to help decision makers overcome the "winner's curse," a phenomenon commonly observed in asymmetric information bargaining situations, and instead found strong support for its robustness. In a series of manipulations of the "Acquiring a Company Task," we tried to enhance decision makers' cognitive understanding of the task....
Article
This paper assesses framing effects on decision making with internal uncertainty, i.e., partial knowledge, by focusing on examinees' behavior in multiple-choice (MC) tests with different scoring rules. In two experiments participants answered a general-knowledge MC test that consisted of 34 solvable and 6 unsolvable items. Experiment 1 studied two...
Article
The guessing of answers in multiple choice tests adds random error to the variance of the test scores, lowering their reliability. Formula scoring rules that penalize for wrong guesses are frequently used to solve this problem. This paper uses prospect theory to analyze scoring rules from a decision-making perspective and focuses on the effects of...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates the distortions in the perception of artificial stereoscopic displays seen from an inappropriate distance and/or orientation. Stereoscopic displays represent 3-D information correctly, provided they are seen from the correct station point. The viewing point may differ from the correct station point in its distance or...
Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates the distortions in the perception of artificial stereoscopic displays seen from an inappropriate distance and/or orientation. Stereoscopic displays represent 3-D information correctly, provided they are seen from the correct station point. The viewing point may differ from the correct station point in its distance or...
Article
This paper examines the effect on learning in simple decision tasks of the addition of a constant to all payoffs. Experiment 1 reveals that this effect, initially observed in a probability learning task, is not limited to single person decision making under uncertainty. Experiment 2 shows that the effect is not linear. Two additional experiments sh...
Article
One of the main difficulties in the development of descriptive models of learning in repeated choice tasks involves the abstraction of the effect of losses. The present paper explains this difficulty, summarizes its common solutions, and presents an experiment that was designed to compare the descriptive power of the specific quantifications of the...
Article
Stereoscopic information is distorted when the observer is not seated at the correct station point. Given a number of people who must watch a stereoscopic display simultaneously, what is the best seating arrangement so that as few people as possible will suffer from distorted perception? This question was analysed mathematically. Regardless of the...
Article
A series of six experiments compared several approaches to displaying 3D point information on a CRT screen. The methods used included perspective, motion, stereo, and numeric information, in various combinations. Measures included error rate and reaction times on three tasks, which all involved deciding whether a given configuration of dots exhibit...
Article
Emotions can powerfully influence negotiations. In this paper, we describe how negotiators regulate their emotions. We demonstrate that individuals often perceive negotiations in competitive terms and believe that feeling angry during a negotiation confers a strategic advantage. Across four studies, we find that individuals deliberately increase or...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Archived project
This project investigates the fundamental social motives, e.g., across different cultures and contexts.
Project
We are conducting a meta-analysis on the role of intuition vs deliberation in honesty. Specifically, we are interested in experiments measuring the decision to lie or the cognitive cost of lying, and manipulating cognitive processing. If you have relevant data, please share the with us More info: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B1lEXSRpLm7la0tsdFpHTTAwTVU/view