Yingying Xie

Yingying Xie
Northern Kentucky University | NKU · Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

14
Publications
4,152
Reads
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374
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
372 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on the impacts from climate change on plant phenology and associated ecosystem processes. I use integrated approaches including field observation, remote sensing (ranging from time lapse cameras to Unmanned Aerial Vehicle systems (UAVs) and satellites) and statistical modelings to identify the mechanisms, patterns, forecasts, and consequences associated with plant phenology in temperate forest biomes.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Northwestern University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
Description
  • Teaching GIS Level 1 & 2 courses, R Data Science, Global Change Ecology, and one of core courses of the Program, Humans and the Environment.
August 2016 - July 2018
University at Buffalo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
August 2016 - July 2018
University at Buffalo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Co-developed a new course, Global Change Ecology. The course will include lectures, discussions, hands-on exercises, and a group project. I will teach the course as an instructor in spring 2018.

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Species occurrence records are essential to understanding Earth's biodiversity and addressing global environmental issues, but do not always reflect actual locations of occurrence. Certain geographical coordinates are assigned repeatedly to thousands of observation/collection records. This may result from imperfect data management and georeferencin...
Article
In steep wildfire-burned terrains, intense rainfall can produce large runoff that can trigger highly destructive debris flows. However, the ability to accurately characterize and forecast debris flow susceptibility in burned terrains using physics-based tools remains limited. Here, we augment the Weather Research and Forecasting Hydrological modeli...
Article
Plant-pollinator mutualisms rely upon the synchrony of interacting taxa. Climate change can disrupt this synchrony as phenological responses to climate vary within and across species. However, intra- and interspecific variation in phenological responses is seldom considered simultaneously, limiting our understanding of climate change impacts on int...
Preprint
Full-text available
In steep wildfire-burned terrains, intense rainfall can produce large volumes of runoff that can trigger highly destructive debris flows. The ability to accurately characterize and forecast debris-flow hazards in burned terrains, however, remains limited. Here, we augment the Weather Research and Forecasting Hydrological modeling system (WRF-Hydro)...
Article
Shifts in the timing of autumnal leaf coloration and leaf drop in temperate forests with climate change can have substantial impacts on community and ecosystem processes (e.g. altered carbon/nitrogen cycling and biotic interactions). However, the environmental control of autumn phenology remains significantly understudied in striking contrast to sp...
Article
Full-text available
Plant leaf phenology is typically observed either via ground-based visual observations on individuals or via remote sensing of land surface vegetation. To integrate phenological information from both data sources, collected at different spatial scales using different observational protocols, digital cameras were deployed spanning canopy areas with...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Invasive species are often expected to benefit from novel conditions encountered with global change. Our range models based on demography show that invasive Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) may have much lower establishment in New England under future climate, despite prolific success under current climate, whereas other invasive an...
Article
Shifts in plant phenology can have direct impacts on community and ecosystem-level processes as well as substantial economic impacts including declines in maple syrup production and changes in the timing and vividness in fall foliage as this affects ecotourism. Understanding how plant phenology mechanistically responds to environmental variation is...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Autumnal phenological shifts (leaf senescence and dormancy) because of climate change bring substantial impacts on community and ecosystem processes (e.g. altered C and N cycling and phenological mismatches) and the fall foliage ecotourism industry. However, the understanding of the environmental control of autumn phenology has changed...
Article
Full-text available
Temporal shifts in phenology are important biotic indicators of climate change. Satellite-derived Land Surface Phenology (LSP) offers data for the study of vegetation phenology at landscape to global spatial scales. However, the mechanisms of plant phenological responses to temperature are rarely considered at broad spatial scales, despite the pote...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Observed phenological changes in recent decades across temperate forest regions, such as earlier leafing in the spring or later leaf senescence in the fall, provide a dramatic indication of biological response to climate change. While mechanisms of spring phenology (bud burst, leafing out, and flowering) have been well...

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