Yimen Araya

Yimen Araya
Center for Biodiversity Dynamics (CBD)

PhD

About

46
Publications
9,040
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1,386
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (46)
Article
Full-text available
Environmental conditions during early-life development can have lasting effects shaping individual heterogeneity in fitness and fitness-related traits. The length of telomeres, the DNA sequences protecting chromosome ends, may be affected by early-life conditions, and telomere length (TL) has been associated with individual performance within some...
Article
Full-text available
An animal’s behavioral phenotype comprises several traits, which are hierarchically structured in functional units. This is manifested in measured behaviors often being correlated, partly reflecting the need of a coordinated functional response. Unfortunately, we still have limited understanding whether consistent differences in animal behaviors ar...
Article
Full-text available
Intra-specific aggressive interactions play a prominent role in the life of many animals. While studies have found evidence for repeatability in boldness, activity, and exploration in amphibians, we know relatively little about consistent among-individual variation in aggressiveness, despite its importance for male-male competition and territoriali...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Environmental conditions during early-life development can have lasting effects on individual quality and fitness. Telomere length (TL) may correlate with early-life conditions and may be an important mediator or biomarker of individual quality or pace-of-life, as periods of increased energy demands can increase telomere attrition due to oxidati...
Article
Full-text available
Generation time determines the pace of key demographic and evolutionary processes. Quantified as the weighted mean age at reproduction, it can be studied as a life‐history trait that varies within and among populations and may evolve in response to ecological conditions. We combined quantitative genetic analyses with age‐ and density‐dependent mode...
Article
Full-text available
1. The effects of spatial structure on metapopulation dynamics depend upon the interaction between local population dynamics and dispersal, and how this relationship is affected by the geographical isolation and spatial heterogeneity in habitat characteristics. 2. Our aim is to examine how emigration and immigration of house sparrows, Passer domest...
Article
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Dispersal has a crucial role determining eco‐evolutionary dynamics through both gene flow and population size regulation. However, to study dispersal and its consequences, one must distinguish immigrants from residents. Dispersers can be identified using telemetry, capture‐mark‐recapture (CMR) methods, or genetic assignment methods. All of these me...
Preprint
Full-text available
Generation time determines the pace of key demographic and evolutionary processes. Quantified as the weighted mean age at reproduction, it can be studied as a trait that varies within and among populations and may evolve in response to ecological conditions. We combined quantitative genetic analyses with age- and density-dependent models to study g...
Article
Phenological traits, such as the timing of reproduction, are often influenced by social interactions between paired individuals. Such partner effects may occur when pair members affect each other’s pre-breeding environment. Partner effects can be environmentally and/or genetically determined, and quantifying direct and indirect genetic effects is i...
Article
Animal ecologists often collect hierarchically‐structured data and analyze these with linear mixed‐effects models. Specific complications arise when the effect sizes of covariates vary on multiple levels (e.g., within vs among subjects). Mean‐centering of covariates within subjects offers a useful approach in such situations, but is not without pro...
Article
Understanding how environmental variation affects phenotypic evolution requires models based on ecologically realistic assumptions that include variation in population size and specific mechanisms by which environmental fluctuations affect selection. Here we generalize quantitative genetic theory for environmentally‐induced stochastic selection to...
Article
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In the context of social evolution, the ecological drivers of selection are the phenotypes of other individuals. The social environment can thus evolve, potentially changing the adaptive value for different social strategies. Different branches of evolutionary biology have traditionally focused on different aspects of these feedbacks. Here, we synt...
Article
Full-text available
Linear mixed‐effects models are powerful tools for analyzing complex datasets with repeated or clustered observations, a common data structure in ecology and evolution. Mixed‐effects models involve complex fitting procedures and make several assumptions, in particular about the distribution of residual and random effects. Violations to these assump...
Article
Anthropogenic noise (≤ 3 kHz) can affect key features of birds’ acoustic communication via two different processes: (1) song‐learning, because songbirds need to hear themselves and other birds to crystallize their song, and (2) avoidance of song elements that overlap with anthropogenic noise. In this study we tested whether anthropogenic noise redu...
Article
Inbreeding may increase the extinction risk of small populations. Yet, studies using modern genomic tools to investigate inbreeding depression in nature have been limited to single populations, and little is known about the dynamics of inbreeding depression in subdivided populations over time. Natural populations often experience different environm...
Article
Full-text available
To maintain group cohesion while coordinating group movements, individuals might use signals to advertise the location of a route, their intention to initiate movements, or their position at a given time. In highly mobile animals, the latter is often accomplished through contact calls that are emitted at different rates by group members. Here, we d...
Article
Full-text available
Research on ecosystem stability has had a strong focus on local systems. However, environmental change often occurs slowly at broad spatial scales, which requires regional-level assessments of long-term stability. In this study, we assess the stability of macroinvertebrate communities across 105 lakes in the Swedish "lakescape". Using a hierarchica...
Article
1.Adaptive integration of life history and behaviour is expected to result in variation in the pace‐of‐life. Previous work focused on whether “risky” phenotypes live‐fast‐but‐die‐young, but reported conflicting support. We posit that individuals exhibiting risky phenotypes may alternatively invest heavily in early‐life reproduction but consequently...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that animals often differ consistently from one another in their behaviour. Most work has focused on consistent differences in average behaviour, generally referred to as 'animal per-sonality'. However, individuals may also differ consistently from one another in how they change their behaviour over time or across environment...
Article
Full-text available
Parental provisioning behavior is a major determinant of offspring growth and survival, but high provisioning rates might come at the cost of increased predation threat. Parents should thus adjust provisioning activity according to current predation threat levels. Moreover, life-history theory predicts that response to predation threat should be co...
Article
Natural selection often favors particular combinations of functionally-related traits, resulting in adaptive phenotypic integration. Phenotypic integration has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the existence of repeatable among-individual differences in behavior (i.e., animal personality). In this study, we investigated patterns of...
Article
Body size plays a key role in the ecology and evolution of all organisms. Therefore, quantifying the sources of morphological (co)variation, dependent and independent of body size, is of key importance when trying to understand and predict responses to selection. We combine structural equation modeling with quantitative genetics analyses to study m...
Article
We present a novel perspective on life‐history evolution that combines recent theoretical advances in fluctuating density‐dependent selection with the notion of pace‐of‐life syndromes (POLSs) in behavioural ecology. These ideas posit phenotypic co‐variation in life‐history, physiological, morphological and behavioural traits as a continuum from the...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating the repeatability of trait variation between individuals, that is the amount of individual variation in relation to overall phenotypic variation, indicates an upper level of heritability and reveals whether a given trait may be subject to selection. Labile traits are characterized by high levels of flexibility and consequently low tra...
Article
Full-text available
Investigating the repeatability of trait variation between individuals, that is the amount of individual variation in relation to overall phenotypic variation, indicates an upper level of heritability and reveals whether a given trait may be subject to selection. Labile traits are characterized by high levels of flexibility and consequently low tra...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative analyses have demonstrated the existence of a ”pace-of-life” (POL) continuum of life-history strategies, from fast-reproducing short-lived species to slow-reproducing long-lived species. This idea has been extended to the concept of a ”pace-of-life syndrome” (POLS), an axis of phenotypic covariation among individuals within species, con...
Article
Non-consumptive predator effects have been shown to influence a wide range of behavioural, life history, and morphological traits. Extra-pair reproduction is widespread among socially monogamous birds and may incur predation costs. Consequently, altered rates of extra-pair reproduction are expected in circumstances characterized by increased adult...
Article
Full-text available
Parents provisioning their offspring can adopt different tactics to meet increases in offspring demand. In this study, we experimentally manipulated brood demand in free living great tits (Parus major) via brood size manipulations and compared the tactics adopted by parents in 2 successive years (2010 and 2011) with very different ecological condit...
Article
Full-text available
1. Assortative mating in wild populations is commonly reported as the correlation between males’ and females’ phenotypes across mated pairs. Theories of partner selection and quantitative genetics assume that phenotypic resemblance of partners captures associations in “intrinsically determined” trait values. However, when considering traits with a...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic variation exists in and at all levels of biological organization: variation exists among species, within-populations among-individuals, and in the case of labile traits, within-individuals. Mixed-effects models represent ideal tools to quantify multi-level measurements of traits and are being increasingly used in evolutionary ecology. 2....
Article
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Males of socially monogamous species can increase their siring success via within-pair and extra-pair fertilizations. In this study, we focused on the different sources of (co)variation between these siring routes, and asked how each contributes to total siring success. We quantified the fertilization routes to siring success, as well as behaviors...
Article
In animal contests, individuals respond plastically to the phenotypes of the opponents that they confront. These “opponent”—or “indirect”—effects are often repeatable, for example, certain opponents consistently elicit more or less aggressiveness in others. “Personality” (repeatable among-individual variation in behavior) has been proposed as an im...
Article
In socially monogamous species, male fertilization-related behaviors are expected to be tuned to the fertile cycle of their social female. How a male adjusts his fertilization-related behaviors to his social mate’s fertile period is relatively well understood. However, the influence of the social mate’s fertility stage on a male’s extrapair siring...
Article
Evolutionary ecologists increasingly study reaction norms that are expressed repeatedly within the same individual's lifetime. For example, foragers continuously alter anti-predator vigilance in response to moment-to-moment changes in predation risk. Variation in this form of plasticity occurs both among and within individuals. Among-individual var...
Article
Full-text available
A number of studies have suggested that avian brood size is individually optimized. Yet, optimal reproductive decisions likely vary owing to among-individual differences in environmental sensitivity. Specifically, 'proactive' individuals who do not track environmental changes may be less able to produce optimal brood sizes than 'reactive' individua...
Article
Behavioural ecologists increasingly study behavioural variation within and among individuals in conjunction, thereby integrating research on phenotypic plasticity and animal personality within a single adaptive framework. Interactions between individuals (cf. social environments) constitute a major causative factor of behavioural variation at both...
Article
Full-text available
Individuals often show consistent differences in risk-taking behaviours; behaviours that increase resource acquisition at the expense of an increased risk of mortality. Recently, basal metabolic rate (BMR) has been suggested as a potentially important state variable underlying adaptive individual differences in a range of behaviours, including risk...
Article
Biologists often study phenotypic evolution assuming that phenotypes consist of a set of quasi-independent units that have been shaped by selection to accomplish a particular function. In the evolutionary literature, such quasi-independent functional units are called 'evolutionary characters', and a framework based on evolutionary principles has be...
Article
Full-text available
Sampling bias is a key issue to consider when designing studies to address biological questions and its importance has been widely discussed in the literature. However, some forms of bias remain underestimated. We investigated the roosting decisions of free-living great tits utilizing nest-boxes in response to the installation of a novel object (a...
Article
Full-text available
Repeatable behavioural traits ('personality') have been shown to covary with fitness, but it remains poorly understood how such behaviour-fitness relationships come about. We applied a multivariate approach to reveal the mechanistic pathways by which variation in exploratory and aggressive behaviour is translated into variation in reproductive succ...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The general aim of this project is to advance our understanding of the ecological and evolutionary significance of telomere length in animals in the wild, and in particular, to explore the role of telomeres in mediating life-history trade-off both within and across species. This is obtained by investigating the causes and consequences of telomere length variation within populations of wild house sparrows and across species.
Project
Our group is working on the development of software SQuID to conduct research on mixed models. SQuID software has two main goals: 1) to offer an interactive interface to help people understand the principle and the behaviour of mixed models ; 2) to create a simulation software that will permit the development on new research on the behaviour of mixed models.