Yi-Chia Chen

Yi-Chia Chen
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Psychology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

9
Publications
3,256
Reads
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137
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
117 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Introduction
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - present
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2017 - December 2019
Harvard University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2012 - July 2017
Yale University
Field of study
  • Psychology
September 2008 - June 2011
National Taiwan University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
The perception of shape, it has been argued, also often entails the perception of time. A cookie missing a bite, for example, is seen as a whole cookie that was subsequently bitten. It has never been clear, however, whether such observations truly reflect visual processing. To explore this, we tested whether the perception of history in static shap...
Article
Full-text available
Aesthetic preferences are ubiquitous in visual experience. Indeed, it seems nearly impossible in many circumstances to perceive a scene without also liking or disliking it to some degree. Aesthetic factors are only occasionally studied in mainstream vision science, though, and even then they are often treated as functionally independent from other...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines whether human gaze lacking the confounding factor of eye whites can be processed unconsciously and explores the critical aspects for such process. Utilizing the continuous flash suppression paradigm, a schematic face-with direct or averted gaze, and with neutral, fearful or happy expressions-was presented to one eye while dynami...
Article
Full-text available
Aesthetic experience seems both regular and idiosyncratic. On one hand, there are powerful regularities in what we tend to find attractive versus unattractive (e.g., beaches versus mud puddles).1, 2, 3, 4 On the other hand, our tastes also vary dramatically from person to person:5, 6, 7, 8 what one of us finds beautiful, another might find distaste...
Article
Full-text available
Although most visual aesthetic preferences are likely driven by a mix of personal, historical, and cultural factors, there are exceptions: some may be driven by adaptive mechanisms of visual processing, and so may be relatively consistent across people, contexts, and time. An especially powerful example is the “inward bias”: when a framed image con...
Article
Significance We report an empirical study of gaze deflection—a common experience in which you turn to look in a different direction when someone “catches” you staring at them. We show that gaze cueing (the automatic orienting of attention to locations at which others are looking) is far weaker for such displays, even when the actual eye and head mo...
Article
Full-text available
Representing spatial information is one of our most foundational abilities. Yet in the present work we find that even the simplest possible spatial tasks reveal surprising, systematic misrepresentations of space—such as biases wherein objects are perceived and remembered as being nearer to the centers of their surrounding quadrants. We employed bot...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Dimming the backlight of a liquid crystal display (LCD) reduces the dynamic range and intensity of a displayed image and hence has a profound impact on the perceived image quality. To reflect the actual degradation of image quality perceived by human eye, we take visibility in addition to contrast into account and develop a visibility model for ima...

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