Yesi Cheng

Yesi Cheng
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Human Communication Sciences

PhD

About

4
Publications
4,781
Reads
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6
Citations
Citations since 2016
4 Research Items
6 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220123456

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
The present study employed a self-paced reading task in conjunction with concurrent acceptability judgements to examine how similar or different English natives and Chinese learners of English are when processing non-local agreement. We also tested how deter-miner-number specification modulates number agreement computation in both native and non-na...
Article
Full-text available
The present study uses event-related potentials (ERPs) to examine nonlocal agreement processing between native (L1) English speakers and Chinese–English second language (L2) learners, whose L1 lacks number agreement. We manipulated number marking with determiners ( the vs. that/these ) to see how determiner-specification influences both native and...
Article
Full-text available
Background and aim: Speech and language characteristics of connected speech provide a valuable tool for identifying, diagnosing and monitoring progression in Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Our knowledge of linguistic features of connected speech in AD is primarily derived from English speakers; very little is known regarding patterns of linguistic defic...
Article
Full-text available
Using both offline and online measures, the present study investigates attachment resolution in relative clauses in English natives (L1) and nonnatives (L2). We test how relative clause resolution interacts with linguistic factors and participant-level individual differences. Previous L1 English studies have demonstrated a low attachment preference...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi. In R l used the mixed-effects model and found a tsignificant hree-way interaction between working memory (as a continuous variable), syntactic position (subject position v.s. object position) and ambiguity type (ambiguous v.s. unambiguous). The dependent variable is reading time. Then I looked into the two way interaction between working memory and ambiguity type for each syntactic position but none of the tests reached significance. Does this mean the way I did the follow-up test was not right? Is there any other way to conduct a follow-up test for a three-way interaction in a design like this?
Thank you in advance.

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To identify clinical markers for bilingual AD.