Yeonjeong Kim

Yeonjeong Kim
Carnegie Mellon University | CMU · Tepper School of Business

About

22
Publications
18,497
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475
Citations

Publications

Publications (22)
Preprint
Full-text available
Philosophers have long debated whether, if determinism is true, we should hold people morally responsible for their actions since in a deterministic universe, people are arguably not the ultimate source of their actions nor could they have done otherwise if initial conditions and the laws of nature are held fixed. To reveal how non-philosophers ord...
Chapter
Does the Ship of Theseus present a genuine puzzle about persistence due to conflicting intuitions based on “continuity of form” and “continuity of matter” pulling in opposite directions? Philosophers are divided. Some claim that it presents a genuine puzzle but disagree over whether there is a solution. Others claim that there is no puzzle at all s...
Article
What factors promote or hinder volunteering within organizations and groups? This paper simultaneously explores the impact of individual, contextual, and sociocultural variables on decision making in a special type of social dilemma: the volunteer's dilemma game (VDG). The VDG provides a controlled experimental method for studying volunteering beha...
Preprint
In two three-month diary studies and a large cross-sectional survey, we identified distinguishing features of adults with low versus high levels of moral character. Adults with high levels of moral character tend to consider the needs and interests of others and how their actions affect other people (e.g., they have high levels of Honesty-Humility,...
Preprint
We surveyed well-acquainted dyads about two key moral character traits (Honesty-Humility, Guilt Proneness), as well as several other individual differences. We examined self-other agreement, similarity, assumed similarity, and similarity-free agreement (i.e., self-other agreement controlling for similarity and assumed similarity). Participants proj...
Article
Full-text available
Since at least Hume and Kant, philosophers working on the nature of aesthetic judgment have generally agreed that common sense does not treat aesthetic judgments in the same way as typical expressions of subjective preferences—rather, it endows them with intersubjective validity, the property of being right or wrong regardless of disagreement. More...
Article
This article examines whether people share the Gettier intuition (viz. that someone who has a true justified belief that p may nonetheless fail to know that p) in 24 sites, located in 23 countries (counting Hong Kong as a distinct country) and across 17 languages. We also consider the possible influence of gender and personality on this intuition w...
Article
Full-text available
Guilt-proneness (GP) is an individual difference characterized by a tendency to feel bad about committing transgressions. We investigated how law enforcement job candidates' guilt-proneness relates to their employment suitability, history of employment and legal problems, and counterproductive tendencies. By demonstrating relationships between GP a...
Article
Full-text available
Guilt-proneness (GP) is an individual difference characterized by a tendency to feel bad about committing transgressions. We investigated how law enforcement job candidates’ guilt-proneness relates to their employment suitability, history of employment and legal problems, and counterproductive tendencies. By demonstrating relationships between GP a...
Research
Full-text available
Cohen, T. R., Kim, Y., & Panter, A. T. (2014). The five-item guilt proneness scale (GP-5). Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses contemporary research on moral character and workplace deviance. We take a personality perspective, meaning we view moral character as composed of characteristic patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior that are associated with morality. Whereas most research uses the Big Five model as an organizing framework for understand...
Article
Full-text available
This research examines how employees’ behaviors shape their work environments and vice-versa. We identify and quantify the reciprocal relationship between three forms of workplace mistreatment (i.e., abusive supervision, ostracism, discrimination) and employees’ counterproductive work behavior (CWB) in a twelve-wave longitudinal study with a cross-...
Article
Full-text available
In two three-month diary studies and a large cross-sectional survey, we identified distinguishing features of adults with low versus high levels of moral character. Adults with high levels of moral character tend to consider the needs and interests of others and how their actions affect other people (e.g., they have high levels of Honesty-Humility,...
Article
Full-text available
We surveyed well-acquainted dyads about two key moral character traits (Honesty–Humility, Guilt Proneness), as well as several other individual differences. We examined self-other agreement, similarity, assumed similarity, and similarity-free agreement (i.e., self-other agreement controlling for similarity and assumed similarity). Participants proj...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project will conduct the largest and most systematic study of philosophical intuitions in different cultural groups ever undertaken. Collecting data in more than 15 countries around the world, we will seek to determine the extent to which various philosophical intuitions that have been previously considered universal differ cross-culturally.
Project
Cohen, T. R. & Panter, A. T. (2011-2012). The WECT Project: Workplace experiences and character traits [project information]. Available at: Open Science Framework https://osf.io/w3hgr/. The Work Experiences and Character Traits (WECT) project investigates how character, personality, emotions, and treatment by managers and co-workers affect the frequency with which workers engage in ethical and unethical behavior at their jobs. This interdisciplinary research is at the intersection of social/personality psychology and organizational behavior. In this project, U.S. adults with full-time employment participated in a three-month online diary study about “weekly experiences in the workplace.” They first provided detailed information about their jobs and completed a battery of measures assessing various dimensions of character and personality. To measure character, we assessed a variety of individual differences that have been linked to ethical and unethical choices in prior research (e.g., guilt proneness, honesty-humility, empathic concern, moral identity, cognitive moral development). Following the initial survey, participants completed an online survey once a week for 12 week in which they reported the frequency with which they performed organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB) and counterproductive work behaviors (CWB). The OCB items assessed ethical organizational behaviors (e.g., helping co-workers with work and personal responsibilities, coming in early or staying late without pay), whereas the CWB items assessed unethical organizational behaviors (e.g., verbally or physically abusing co-workers, stealing from one’s employer). The weekly surveys also asked participants about the extent to which they experienced various emotions during the previous week, and how they were treated by managers and co-workers (e.g., the frequency of interpersonal conflict, workplace ostracism, and abusive supervision). In addition to collecting self-reports of personality and behavior, we also collected observer-reports by surveying co-workers of the participants. By examining the factor structure of and longitudinal relations among character, personality, emotions, and workplace experiences, we hope to be able to determine the ways in which these individual differences and situational influences affect ethical and unethical behavior in the workplace. The WECT Project’s Principal Investigators are: Taya R. Cohen, Ph.D. (Carnegie Bosch Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior & Theory, Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University) and Abigail T. Panter, Ph.D. (Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education & Professor of Psychology, L. L. Thurstone Psychometric Laboratory, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). The WECT project was made possible through the support of Grant 15519 from The Character Project at Wake Forest University and the John Templeton Foundation to Taya R. Cohen and A. T. Panter. http://thecharacterproject.com/winners.php