Yegor Malashichev

Yegor Malashichev
Saint Petersburg State University | SPBU · Faculty of Biology

Ph.D.

About

68
Publications
15,908
Reads
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881
Citations
Introduction
Yegor Malashichev worked at the Faculty of Biology, Saint Petersburg State University. Yegor made research in Zoology, Neuroscience and Evolutionary Biology. He passed away on December, 15, 2018. Please, if you have any inquieries, address to his widow Anna Malashicheva amalashicheva@gmail.com
Additional affiliations
November 2015 - present
Institute of Experimental Medicine, Saint Petersburg
Position
  • Principal Investigator
June 2009 - present
Saint Petersburg State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
May 2009 - August 2014
Saint Petersburg State University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
Full-text available
Two brain hemispheres are unequally involved in the processing of social stimuli, as demonstrated in a wide range of vertebrates. A considerable number of studies have shown the right hemisphere advantage for social processing. At the same time, an approach–withdrawal hypothesis, mainly based on experimental evidence, proposes the involvement of bo...
Poster
Full-text available
Development and evolution of the pelvic girdle in Tetrapoda
Article
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Laterality of brain and behavior at the individual and/or group level is a characteristic of all vertebrate classes, including amphibians. It is well recognized that the right-eye/left-hemisphere system is more efficient in discrimination of edible and non-edible items. However, the ontogenesis of this or other lateralized responses has rarely been...
Article
Full-text available
Brain and behavioral asymmetries are often associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, but have yet uncovered genetic and developmental mechanisms. A recent study by Vingerhoets and colleagues (2018), published in Brain Structure and Function, examined neural structural and functional asymmetries in a cohort of patients with situs inversus totali...
Book
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The monograph provides an overview of current data on the distribution and features of manifestation of lateral functions (asymmetry of use) of extremities in vertebrates and, in particular, in mammals. The monograph focuses on a detailed description of the lateralized functions of the forelimb in quadrupedal and bipedal marsupial mammals studied i...
Article
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no abstract (Editorial)
Article
Laterality of brain and behavior at the individual and/or group level is a characteristic of all vertebrate classes. The general pattern of left-right asymmetry in vertebrates is so that left-eye/right-hemisphere system is used to detect socially important images, like conspecifics, and also recognize danger, while the right-eye/left-hemisphere sys...
Article
Full-text available
Theoretical and empirical evidence suggest that socio-biological factors determine the expression of behavioural lateralization across species. One would expect the same association at the intraspecific level, that is, that the differences in social strategies of the two sexes entail the sex differences in the lateralized social processing. This st...
Article
The manifestation of behavioural lateralization has been shown to be modified by environmental conditions, life experiences, and selective breeding. This study tests whether the lateralization recently found in feral domestic horse (Equus caballus) is evident in undomesticated horses. Mother-offspring interactions were investigated in Przewalski's...
Article
Full-text available
The right hemisphere plays a crucial role in social processing. Human mothers show a robust left cradling/holding bias providing greater right-hemispheric involvement in the exchange of social information between mother and infant. Here, we demonstrate that a similar bias is evident in face-to-face spatial interactions in marine and terrestrial non...
Poster
Full-text available
Обнаружено единообразное для детёнышей всех исследованных видов предпочтение держать мать в поле зрения левого глаза как в рутинных, так и в связанных с беспокойством типах поведения.
Article
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Neural crest (NC) is an established source for many endochondral and intramem-branous bones in the skull and postcranial skeleton in vertebrates. Neural crest cells also contribute to the trapezius/cleidohyoideus muscle attachment sites on the shoulder girdle of the mouse, where they are found in the scapula, clavicle, and sternum. In the avian sho...
Article
Full-text available
Robust lateralization in forelimb use has recently been found in bipedal, but not quadrupedal, marsupial mammals. The link between bipedality and handedness, occurring in both marsupials and primates, remains to be investigated. To shed light on the developmental origins of marsupial manual lateralization, infants of macropod marsupials were examin...
Article
Full-text available
Cilia have multiple functions in the development of the entire organism, and participate in the development and functioning of the central nervous system. In the last decade, studies have shown that they are implicated in the development of the visceral left-right asymmetry in different vertebrates. At the same time, some neuropsychiatric disorders...
Article
Full-text available
Left-cradling bias is a distinctive feature of maternal behaviour in humans and great apes, but its evolutionary origin remains unknown. In 11 species of marine and terrestrial mammal, we demonstrate consistent patterns of lateralization in mother–infant interactions, indicating right hemisphere dominance for social processing. In providing clear e...
Article
Full-text available
Asymmetrical forelimb use is characteristic of many mammalian species. However, little is known about this phenomenon in cetaceans. We examined the asymmetry in pectoral flipper use by the wild orca Orcinus orca (Linnaeus, 1758). During observations from motor boats in the Avachinskii Bay (East Kamchatka) we recorded the use of flippers in slapping...
Article
The righting responses, when the animal rights itself over one side of the body after been overturned on the back, are one of the simplest ways to test for laterality, especially in lower vertebrates. In anuran amphibians unilateral preferences in righting responses correlated to the degree of the use of alternating-limb (asynchronous) movements du...
Article
Full-text available
Externally, vertebrates are bilaterally symmetrical; however, left–right asymmetry is observed in the structure of their internal organs and systems of organs (circulatory, digestive, and respiratory). In addition to the asymmetry of internal organs (visceral), there is also functional (i.e., asymmetrical functioning of organs on the left and right...
Article
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Foraging behaviour of many cetacean species features the side biases at the population level. The origin of these behavioural lateralisations remains generally unclear. Here we explored lateralisation in aerial display of resident orcas in different behavioural contexts. Side preferences were analysed in lunging during foraging and breaching. One e...
Data
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(Table) Orcas individual lunging and breaching events in the same individuals
Article
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Recent studies have demonstrated a close resemblance between some handedness patterns in great apes and humans [1-3]. Despite this, comparative systematic investigations of manual lateralization in non-primate mammals are very limited [4, 5]. Among mammals, robust population-level handedness is still considered to be a distinctive human trait [6, 7...
Article
Keywords: Calcium phosphate coatings Copolymer of vinilidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene Pulse laser deposition Hydroxyapatite Monetite a b s t r a c t This work analyses the properties of calcium phosphate coatings obtained by pulsed laser deposition on the surface of the ferroelectric polymer material. Atomic force and scanning electron micr...
Article
Full-text available
Lateralisation in forelimb use at the population and/or individual level has been found in a wide variety of vertebrate species. However, some large taxa have not yet been investigated and that limits a proper evolutionary interpretation of forelimb preferences. Among mammals lateralised use of the forelimbs has been shown for both placentals and m...
Article
Full-text available
1 ФГБОУ ВПО «Санкт-Петербургский государственный университет», Cанкт-Петербург, Россия 2 ФГБУ «Научно-исследовательский институт экспериментальной медицины» Северо-Западного отделения Российской академии наук, Cанкт-Петербург, Россия Загривная Мария Викторовна — кандидат биологических наук, постдок (стажер-исследователь) биологиче-ского факультета...
Article
Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder, affecting ∼1% of the human population. The genetic contribution to schizophrenia is significant, but the genetics are complex and many aspects of brain functioning, from neural development to synapse structure, seem to be involved in the pathogenesis. A novel way to study the molecular causes of schiz...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperative interactions have been argued to be a powerful factor mediating the evolution of lateralization in animals. Mother−infant asymmetric spatial relationships represent a case of social coordination among organisms. Although lateralized interactions between mothers and infants have been found in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, whether...
Article
Full-text available
One of the important aspects of the animal social behavior is the laterality in perception of conspecifics. Spatial laterality in adult–infant interactions is usually revealed in primates as a cradling/holding bias in adults or nipple preference in infants. The origin and function of such biases, however, remain unclear. Here, we investigated spati...
Article
Full-text available
For the first time, behavioural lateralisation was shown in a chondrostean fish (sterlet sturgeon Acipenser ruthenus). A significant directional bias was found in young A. ruthenus swimming along a circular swimway. This laterality manifested itself as an individual preference for a certain movement direction (either clockwise or counterclockwise)...
Article
Full-text available
Acquisition of upright posture in evolution has been argued to facilitate manual laterality in primates. Owing to the high variety of postural habits marsupials can serve as a suitable model to test whether the species-typical body posture shapes forelimb preferences in non-primates or this phenomenon emerged only in the course of primate evolution...
Article
Full-text available
Cooperative interactions have been argued to be a powerful factor mediating the evolution of lateralization in animals. Mother−infant asymmetric spatial relationships represent a case of social coordination among organisms. Although lateralized interactions between mothers and infants have been found in beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, whether...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, the cartilaginous viscerocranium of vertebrates is considered as neural crest (NC)-derived. Morphological work carried out on amphibian embryos in the first half of the XX century suggested potentially mesodermal origin for some hyobranchial elements. Since then, the embryonic sources of the hyobranchial apparatus in amphibians has n...
Article
Full-text available
A major step during the evolution of tetrapods was their transition from water to land. This process involved the reduction or complete loss of the dermal bones that made up connections to the skull and a concomitant enlargement of the endochondral shoulder girdle. In the mouse the latter is derived from three separate embryonic sources: lateral pl...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Factors determining patterns of laterality manifestation in mammals remain unclear. In primates, the upright posture favours the expression of manual laterality across species, but may have little influence within a species. Whether the bipedalism acts the same in non-primate mammals is unknown. Our recent findings in bipedal and quadr...
Article
Full-text available
Visual lateralization in different aspects of social behaviour has been found for numerous species of vertebrates ranging from fish to mammals. For inspection of a shoal mate, many fishes show a left eye-right hemisphere preference. Here, we tested the hypothesis that in fish, there is a key cue in the conspecific appearance, which elicits laterali...
Article
Full-text available
In many primate species, bipedal stance is a factor increasing manual laterality. To understand this phenomenon better, there is a need to investigate forelimb preferences in nonprimate mammals with bipedal locomotion as the preferred gait, such as bipedal hopping marsupials. We studied laterality in forelimb use in 27 adult red-necked wallabies du...
Article
Full-text available
The fire-bellies are among anurans that have the minimal ratio of the number of specimens with the left epicoracoid in the top position to the number of specimens with the right epicoracoid in the top position (L.top/R.top). In Bombina there are no significant geographical and interspecies differences in L.top/R.top, whereas significant sex differe...
Article
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A review of the herpetofauna of the «Belogorye» Natural Reserve was carried out for the «Les na Vorskle » and «Ostrasyev Yar» territories. Twelve amphibian and nine reptilian species were recorded on this territory from 1927 till 2006. Extinction of two amphibian species and two reptile ones was revealed, which was supposed to be a result of climat...
Data
Mother-calf joint surface swimming. This video illustrates a typical episode of a calf swimming to the right of the mother, along with other activities of the calf, i.e., tactile contacts described in the main text. (10.04 MB AVI)
Data
Mother-at-rest and calf surface interactions. This video illustrates a typical behavior of a calf swimming along the resting and mostly motionless mother. (10.17 MB AVI)
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral laterality is known for a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Laterality in social interactions has been described for a wide range of species including humans. Although evidence and theoretical predictions indicate that in social species the degree of population level laterality is greater than in solitary ones, the origin o...
Article
Full-text available
Visual lateralization during observation of a novel object was studied in beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) under natural conditions. As a novel object we used the underwater video camera, which simultaneously recorded whale behaviour. Video camera was placed on the bottom in the area of the beluga summer mating aggregation. After appearance of...
Article
Full-text available
Visual lateralization during observation of a novel object was studied in beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) under natural conditions. As a novel object we used the underwater video camera, which simultaneously recorded whale behaviour. Video camera was placed on the bottom in the area of the beluga summer mating aggregation. After appearance of...
Article
Full-text available
Some animals, notably birds, preferentially approach and capture food items in their right visual field. However, this lateralised behaviour has not been studied extensively in anamniotes. Here we test eye preference during feeding for a fish, (Perccottus glenii; Teleostei, Perciformes), a newt, (Pleurodeles walti; Amphibia, Caudata), and a frog, (...
Article
Full-text available
The pelvic girdle is composed of three skeletal elements: ilium, pubis, and ischium. In comparison with other parts of the postcranial skeleton, its development is not well known to date. To elucidate the embryonic origin of the avian pelvic girdle and the signaling centers that control its development, we have performed extirpation and quail-to-ch...
Article
Full-text available
Cartilaginous epicoracoid plates in the arcipheral pectoral girdle of modern amphibians intersect ventrally along the body midline and overlap so that either the right or the left plate is located dorsal to the other [1, 2]. The ratio between the left and right variants in amphibian populations is species-specific; in different species, the left ep...
Article
Full-text available
Amphibians provide a unique opportunity for identifying possible links between lateralized behaviors, locomotion, and phylogeny and for addressing the origin of lateralized behaviors of higher vertebrates. Five anuran species with different locomotive habits were tested for forelimb and hind limb preferences during 2 stereotyped behavior sequences-...
Article
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2 0 0 6 C o p y r i g h t E u r e k a h / L a n d e s B i o s c i e n c e D o N o t D i s t r i b u t e CHAPTER 4 Abstract B ehavioral laterality on the basis of physiological neural asymmetries does not seem to develop under the control of the same developmental mechanisms with asymmetries of the visceral organs. Earlier, we have found little evid...
Article
Full-text available
Although limb development has been a subject of intense research over the last decades, development of the girdles has been poorly investigated. Particularly, a detailed analysis of pelvic girdle development including functional data is not available to date. Here, we describe the early steps of the formation of mesenchymal and cartilaginous anlage...
Article
Full-text available
Development of the fine structure of the anguloarticulare, retroarticulare, quadratum, urostyle, and uroneurale of five species of Notothenioidei is investigated: Lindbergichthys nudifrons, L. microps, Nototheniopsis larseni, Trematomus newnesi, and Pleuragramma antarcticum. The dual (integumentary and substituting) origin of the anguloarticulare a...
Article
The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in studies on the development, function and evolution of asymmetries in vertebrates, including amphibians. Here we discuss current knowledge of behavioral and anatomical asymmetries in amphibians. Behavioral laterality in the response of both adult and larval anurans to presumed predators and competitors...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological and behavioural asymmetries in amphibians are reviewed. Among the characteristics considered are: (1) the asymmetry of the shoulder girdle (epicoracoid overlap); (2) the distribution of the left and right variants of its structure in amphibian populations; (3) asymmetry in the position of the spiracle(s); (4) asymmetric order of forel...
Article
Full-text available
We studied left-right asymmetry in forelimb and hindlimb use in green toads (Bufo viridis) and fire-bellied toads (Bombina bombina) and investigated its possible relationship to the asymmetric structure of the shoulder girdle (epicoracoid overlap) in the latter species. To estimate forelimb use preference we used a modified ''snout-wiping test'' (B...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the "limb bud" hypothesis, which explains morphogenetic mechanisms of the formation of the sacroiliac skeletal complex in tetrapods. The hypothesis assumes that: 1) the destruction of the embryonal sacral myomeres and the appearance in their place of a sacral gap filled in with mesenchymal cells favor the development of the sacroiliac com...
Article
Full-text available
A new type of behavior in a B. variegata female (female amplexus) is described. It is similar to a kind of aggressive behavior known for Rana temporaria. Female amplexus is interpreted however as non-typical mating rather than aggressive behavior. Interactions of fire-bellied toads at presentation of food are also discussed. It is inferred from ori...

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