Ye Mu

Ye Mu
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Department of Geography

Doctor of Philosophy
PhD student

About

9
Publications
2,458
Reads
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39
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - May 2021
San Diego State University
Position
  • Graduate Assistant
Education
August 2019 - May 2021
San Diego State University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Full-text available
Amazonian tropical rainforest is being converted to other land cover types including crops and pasture. In deforested areas, secondary forest grows after pastures are abandoned, and ‘dirty pasture’ that has trees and shrubs but is actively used for grazing are also regionally important land cover types following forest conversion. This study descri...
Article
Tropical rainforests provide essential ecosystem services to agricultural areas, including moisture recycling. In the Amazon basin, drought frequency has increased in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, but the role of forests, ocean, and non‐forested areas in causing or mitigating drought has not been determined. Using a precipitationshed mois...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate long-term estimates of rainfall at fine spatial and temporal resolution are vital for hydrometeorology and climatology studies, but such data are often unavailable in remote regions. We assessed the accuracy of three satellite-based precipitation products that have data from 1981 to 2019 over the state of Rondônia in the Brazilian Amazon:...
Article
Full-text available
This collaborative article discusses the opportunities and challenges of adopting integrated, coordinated, open, and networked (ICON) principles in atmospheric sciences. From the global nature of the atmosphere, there has always been a need for atmospheric science to be an ICON science. With the help of evolving technology, it is possible to go fur...
Article
Full-text available
Rainfall in the Amazon is influenced by atmospheric circulation dynamics on multiple spatiotemporal scales. Anthropogenic influences such as deforestation, land-use changes, and global climate change are also critical factors in determining rainfall in South America. Modeling studies have projected a drier climate with the ongoing deforestation in...
Article
Full-text available
This article provides a commentary about the state of integrated, coordinated, open, and networked (ICON) principles in Earth and Planetary Surface Processes and discussion on the opportunities and challenges of adopting them. This commentary focuses on the challenges with current inclusive, equitable, and accessible science and highlights how rese...
Research
Full-text available
In Dr. Kate Swanson's Qualitative Research Methods class, we undertook an in-depth research project on how students and faculty perceive their educational experiences at SDSU. To conduct this research, we surveyed 170 students and conducted 30 student and faculty interviews across multiple colleges. In summary, while both students and faculty expre...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
This research project integrates empirical and modeling methods to investigate the trends in the spatial and temporal patterns of rainfall and the impacts of land use, atmospheric systems, and climatic modes on the meteorological droughts in the state of Rondônia in the Brazilian Amazon. The Amazon exhibits a high spatial and temporal variability of rainfall with a very pronounced seasonality. The ongoing significant deforestation in Rondônia can affect surface temperatures, evapotranspiration, and rainfall at a local scale, while large scale meteorological systems and tropical climatic modes can also explain the rainfall variability. Consequently, an urgency exists to implement and analyze local land use and large-scale climatic drivers that will explain the spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in the Amazon, including meteorological drought frequency and magnitude.