Ye Li

Ye Li
University of California, Riverside | UCR · Department of Management

PhD

About

17
Publications
32,016
Reads
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2,064
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - present
University of California, Riverside
Position
  • Assistant Professor of Management & Marketing
October 2009 - July 2012
Columbia University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2004 - September 2009
University of Chicago
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Researchers and practitioners in marketing, economics, and public policy often use preference elicitation tasks to forecast real-world behaviors. These tasks typically ask a series of similarly-structured questions. The authors posit that every time a respondent answers an additional elicitation question, two things happen: (1) they provide informa...
Article
Climate change is a complex phenomenon that the public learns about both abstractly through media and education, and concretely through personal experiences. While public beliefs about global warming may be controversial in some circles, an emerging body of research on the ‘local warming’ effect suggests that people’s judgments of climate change or...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter explores the interplay between fluid intelligence declines and higher levels of crystallized intelligence of older adults as they affect everyday decision-making ability. Specifically, we explore the hypothesis that accumulated knowledge and expertise may help compensate for age-related declines in fluid cognitive function. The complem...
Article
Full-text available
Age-related deterioration in cognitive ability may compromise the ability of older adults to make major financial decisions. We explore whether knowledge and expertise accumulated from past decisions can offset cognitive decline to maintain decision quality over the life span. Using a unique dataset that combines measures of cognitive ability (flui...
Article
Full-text available
A revolution in the science of emotion has emerged in recent decades, with the potential to create a paradigm shift in decision theories. The research reveals that emotions constitute potent, pervasive, predictable, sometimes harmful and sometimes beneficial drivers of decision making. Across different domains, important regularities appear in the...
Article
Full-text available
The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that "hot" affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision...
Data
Full-text available
The human mind tends to excessively discount the value of delayed rewards relative to immediate ones, and it is thought that “hot” affective processes drive desires for short-term gratification. Supporting this view, recent findings demonstrate that sadness exacerbates financial impatience even when the sadness is unrelated to the economic decision...
Article
Full-text available
Fluid intelligence decreases with age, yet evidence about age declines in decision-making quality is mixed: Depending on the study, older adults make worse, equally good, or even better decisions than younger adults. We propose a potential explanation for this puzzle, namely that age differences in decision performance result from the interplay bet...
Article
Full-text available
We hypothesized a phenomenon that we term myopic misery. According to our hypothesis, sadness increases impatience and creates a myopic focus on obtaining money immediately instead of later. This focus, in turn, increases intertemporal discount rates and thereby produces substantial financial costs. In three experiments, we randomly assigned partic...
Article
As organizations move towards increasingly group-based work environments, workers make more decisions on how much effort they will exert for the benefit of their coworkers. Past research on prosocial behavior has not compared people’s willingness to exert effort for others versus for themselves, a gap this research fills. In three experiments using...
Article
Full-text available
Although people are quite aware of global warming, their beliefs about it may be malleable; specifically, their beliefs may be constructed in response to questions about global warming. Beliefs may reflect irrelevant but salient information, such as the current day's temperature. This replacement of a more complex, less easily accessed judgment wit...
Article
Decision-makers often evaluate options sequentially due to constraints on attention, timing, or physical location of the options. Choosing the best option will therefore often depend on people's memories of the options. Because imperfect recall introduces uncertainty in earlier options, judgments of those options should regress toward the category...
Article
People, across a wide range of personal and professional domains, need to detect change accurately. Previous research has documented systematic shortcomings in doing so, in particular, a pattern of over- and under-reaction to indications of change, resulting from a tendency to overweight signals of change at the expense of the environment that prod...
Article
Full-text available
We study the response of populations of digital organisms that adapt to a time-varying (periodic) fitness landscape of two oscillating peaks. We corroborate in general predictions from quasi-species theory in dynamic landscapes, such as adaptation to the average fitness landscape at small periods (high frequency) and quasistatic adaptation at large...

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