Yasuhiro Daiku

Yasuhiro Daiku
Osaka University | Handai · Graduate School of Human Sciences

Ph.D. in Human Sciences
Working for a private company.

About

9
Publications
521
Reads
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33
Citations
Introduction
Yasuhiro Daiku is an invited researcher at Osaka University, Japan while working for a marketing company. His research focuses on lie /deception detection. He is also interested in solving the problem of scam. Email: mail [at mark] yasuhirodaiku.com
Additional affiliations
April 2020 - March 2021
Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2020 - present
Osaka University
Position
  • Researcher
September 2018 - February 2019
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Position
  • Visiting Scholar
Education
April 2017 - March 2021
Osaka University
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
April 2015 - March 2017
Osaka University
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
April 2011 - March 2015
Osaka University
Field of study
  • Social Psychology

Publications

Publications (9)
Article
Hundreds of experiments have examined people’s ability to distinguish truths from lies. Meta-analyses suggest that the findings from larger scale experiments converge and that findings discrepant from the meta-analytic average of 54% occur in only smaller experiments. Study size (number of data points, or total number of judgments) is a joint funct...
Article
Full-text available
Research on elderly financial exploitation has mostly focused on financial abuse that occurs in families and other types of trusted relationships. As such, little is known about financial frauds and scams perpetrated by strangers. Financial fraud and scam prevention activities for older adults must be promoted, for which the correlation between the...
Article
Full-text available
Very little research has focused on the subject of lying in everyday life, despite the benefits such study would provide. In this paper, we reanalyze the data from Murai’s work in 2000, which examined the telling of lies and the perception of being lied to in daily life by using a diary method in which participants recorded events in a diary for a...
Article
How do people “suspect” lies? We conducted a study on Japanese university students using the diary method to investigate situations in which people are deceived. We also created a taxonomy of sources of suspicion and examined whether behavioral cues or non-behavioral evidence were more frequently used to develop suspicions about being deceived. Par...
Article
Full-text available
Truth-Default Theory (TDT) predicts that across countries and cultures, a few people tell most of the lies, while a majority of people lie less frequently than average. This prediction, referred to as “a few prolific liars,” is tested in Japan. The study further investigated the extent to which the Dark Triad personality traits predict the frequenc...
Article
Corporal punishment in the setting of extracurricular school sport activities (bukatsu in Japan) has attracted public attention since 2013. Previous research studies attempted to characterize the actual conditions of corporal punishment in bukatsu. Several studies have demonstrated that direct experience with corporal punishment in bukatsu led to a...
Article
Full-text available
Financial scams have caused tremendous financial damage globally. In Japan, the police forewarn people by equipping them with scam-prevention techniques or providing awareness regarding examples of previous scams; however, this does not appear to effectively prevent the damage, as many scam victims do not remember these warnings when faced with act...
Article
Research has found discrepancies among folk beliefs about lie detection, deception cue utility, and retrospective accounts of detected lies. Elite customs agents (N = 37) were surveyed regarding their overall beliefs about how to detect lies (general strategy), their opinions about best practices (best strategy), and about a successfully detected l...
Article
In this study, we investigated whether the attribution of causes to fraud victims relates to an individual’s perception of vulnera- bility to scams. We presented a fraud case to undergraduate stu- dents and asked them to rate the victims’ responsibility for being defrauded and their own vulnerability to scams. The result showed that participants pe...

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