Yannis Chatzikonstantinou

Yannis Chatzikonstantinou
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | AUTH · History and Archaeology (Prehistoric Archaeology)

About

3
Publications
289
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0
Citations
Citations since 2016
3 Research Items
0 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
20162017201820192020202120220.00.51.01.52.02.53.0
Introduction
My research interest focuses on the deciphering of the funerary practice of cremation and the understanding of the role of the fire in the manipulation of the deceased in the prehistoric Aegean through the detailed and multidisciplinary examination of the human remains (Early Minoan tholos tomb cemetery at Koumasa, Crete). My approach combines a macroscopic recording of the heat-induced changes, a selected application of FTIR, carbon and oxygen isotope analyses and some experimental approaches.
Additional affiliations
January 2022 - July 2022
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • Applying infrared measurements (FTIR-ATR), carbon, and oxygen analyses in archaeological bones from the Early Minoan (3rd millennia BC) cemetery of Koumasa, Crete, supervised by Professor Dr. Christophe Snoeck.
November 2019 - November 2024
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Prehistoric Archaeology and Osteoarchaeology
Education
September 2017 - February 2018
The University of Sheffield
Field of study
  • Human Osteology, Funerary Archaeology, Experimental Archaeology
November 2016 - April 2019
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Field of study
  • Prehistoric Archaeology
October 2012 - August 2016
Aristotle University of Thessaloniki
Field of study
  • History, Archaeology and History of Arts

Publications

Publications (3)
Poster
Full-text available
During the Early Iron Age (11th – 7th century BC) urn cremations in central Macedonia have been revealed in a few cemeteries (e.g., Polichni, Axioupolis, Nikiti/Ai Giannis, Koukos, Makrygialos, Nea Efkarpia, Nea Philadelphia, Torone, Ierissos), and often they co-occur with inhumations. Polichni is located in the west suburbs of Thessaloniki, Greece...
Poster
Full-text available
The proposed poster summarizes the preliminary results of the macroscopic examination carried out in selected cremations from Iron Age Central Macedonia. The discrete regional variability expressed in the mortuary picture of the Late Bronze Age would acquire a more standardized form in Iron Age Macedonia, in which, from the 11th c. onwards, a range...
Chapter
Full-text available
Burnt human remains are often discovered in archaeological funerary contexts. Burnt bones should be recorded and analyzed systematically despite their moderate preservation and intense heat-induced changes. A multidisciplinary approach, including archaeological and experimental data, can lead to fruitful interpretation emphasizing the complexity of...

Network

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
TEFRA research program aims to approach the practice of burning the human body in a chronological horizon which extends from the Neolithic (7th mill. BCE) to the Early Iron Age (11th-9th c. BC), according to two dimensions: the technology of the use of fire and the bio-anthropology that is the demographic synthesis and the biological attributes of the people whose bodies were subjected to burning. The project is funded by: H.F.R.I. (Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation) in the framework of the 2nd Call for H.F.R.I.’s Research Projects to Support Faculty Members & Researchers (A.U.Th. Research Committee Project No: 73268), under the supervision of the Principal Investigator Assistant Professor, Dr. Sevasti Triantaphyllou.
Project
The cemetery of Koumasa, Crete was first excavated by Xanthoudides in 1904 while a renewed excavation project has been undertaken since 2012 under the direction of Professor Diamantis Panagiotopoulos from the University of Heidelberg, Germany. The cemetery is located on the northern fringes of the Asterousia Mountains on a steep slope overlooking the Messara Plain and consists of three tholoi (A, B, and E) and one rectangular tomb (tomb Γ) and is dated from Early Minoan IIA to Middle Minoan I (early 3rd millennia B.C.) based on ceramic typology. The systematic study and macroscopic recording of the human remains found in tholos B are completed, and the results will be published in my PhD, supervised by Assistant Professor Sevasti Triantaphyllou from the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.