Yangyang Zhao

Yangyang Zhao
Xiamen University | XMU · State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science

Doctor of Philosophy
Looking for a postdoc position on deoxygenation and ocean acidification responding to global climate change

About

20
Publications
8,884
Reads
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153
Citations
Introduction
Yangyang Zhao currently studies at the State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science (MEL), Xiamen University. His research interests are interactive deoxygenation and ocean acidification responding to global climate change using big data analysis, data assimilation and numerical models. His PhD project is on the hypoxia and its coupling to ocean acidification and carbon/nitrogen cycles in large estuary-shelf systems.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - September 2021
ETH Zurich
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • As a visiting student in the Environmental Physics group of Prof. Nicolas Gruber, working on the modulation of seawater N:P ratios from the Amazon River to the Western Tropical Atlantic using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model (ROMS-BEC)
December 2015 - May 2016
Nanjing University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2012 - June 2015
Nanjing University
Field of study
  • Marine Geology
September 2008 - June 2012
Nanjing University
Field of study
  • Oceanography

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
The region consisting of the Bohai, Yellow and East China seas represents a typical wide continental shelf environment with abundant terrestrial sediment supply. Here a variety of sedimentary systems have been formed during the Holocene period. These systems have unique characteristics in terms of spatial distribution, material composition, deposit...
Article
The artificial introduction and rapid expansion of Spartina alterniflora Loisel (S. alterniflora) have greatly changed the natural evolution of tidal flats, especially along the Jiangsu coast, China. The occurrence of an elevation gap at the seaward marsh margin (marsh-edge cliffs) manifests that tidal flats have experienced severe regional erosion...
Article
Full-text available
Global coastal oceans as a whole represent an important carbon sink, but due to high spatial-temporal variability, a mechanistic conceptualization of the coastal carbon cycle is still under development, hindering the modelling and inclusion of coastal carbon in Earth System Models. Although temperature is considered an important control of sea surf...
Article
We examined the dynamics of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and pH in the Pearl River Estuary (PRE) and the adjacent northern South China Sea (NSCS) shelf in summer, aiming for a better understanding of the interaction between eutrophication, hypoxia and ocean acidification. Using a semi-analytical diagnostic approach based on validated multiple-e...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the evolution of intermittent hypoxia off the Pearl River estuary based on three cruise legs conducted in July 2018: one during severe hypoxic conditions before the passage of a typhoon and two post-typhoon legs showing destruction of the hypoxia and its reinstatement. The lowest ever recorded regional dissolved oxygen (DO) concentratio...
Article
This review examines the current understanding of the global coastal ocean carbon cycle and provides a new quantitative synthesis of air-sea CO2 exchange. This reanalysis yields an estimate for the globally integrated coastal ocean CO2 flux of −0.25 ± 0.05 Pg C year−1, with polar and subpolar regions accounting for most of the CO2 removal (>90%). A...
Article
The saltmarsh plant Spartina alterniflora was introduced to the Jiangsu coasts, China and serves as an ecological engineer to reduce near-bed shear stress, trap fine-grained sediments and protect the coast from wave-induced erosion. The saltmarshes thus could record the Spartina colonization-driven changes within the sedimentary layers. Based on th...
Preprint
Full-text available
We examined the evolution of intermittent hypoxia off the Pearl River Estuary during three cruise legs conducted 15 in July 2018: one during severe hypoxic conditions before the passage of a typhoon and two post-typhoon legs showing destruction of the hypoxia and its reinstatement. The lowest ever regional dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of 3.5...
Article
Full-text available
To better understand the sources and recycling of labile organic matter in coastal water, we studied the carbon isotope signature of particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate amino acids, a major group of labile organic compounds, on the shelf of the northern South China Sea. In addition, we were able to compare effects of hypoxia on labile...
Article
Coastal lagoons with small catchment basins are highly sensitive to natural processes and anthropogenic activities. To figure out the environmental changes of a coastal lagoon and its contribution to carbon burial, two sediment cores were collected in Xincun Lagoon, southeastern Hainan Island and ²¹⁰Pb activities, grain size parameters, total organ...
Article
Coastal lagoon deposits provide evidence for the magnitude and frequency of past tropical cyclones prior to instrumental records and historical documentation. In the present study, we attempt to analyze the sedimentary records containing typhoon information for the northern South China Sea region. For this purpose, sediment cores were collected fro...
Article
Full-text available
In order to understand the Holocene coastal environmental evolution in southeast Hainan Island, we carried out shallow seismic survey over the Xincun and Li-An lagoons. The four seismic profiles obtained reveal an average thickness of 30 m for the Holocene sequences. Based on these seismic profiles, we identified two seismic units with thicknesses...
Article
On the Holocene temporal scale, the formation of sedimentary records are controlled mainly by sedi- ment supply, transport and accumulation processes. Analysis of the sedimentary record of the abandoned Yel- low River can reflect the sediment source to sink characteristics during the historical periods when the Yellow River shifted its course to th...
Article
Full-text available
Marsh-edge cliffs represent a unique geomorphological unit at the border of marsh vegetation and the intertidal mud flat. Research on the processes and mechanisms for the formation of salt-marsh marginal cliffs will improve our understanding of the influence of salt marshes on tidal flat growth and stability. Based on the results obtained from the...
Article
Since Spartina alterniflora was transplanted on the Jiangsu coast in 1979, its rapid expansion has a great impact on the native coastal ecosystem. In Rudong, Fistulobalanus albicostatus provides a typical example of the influence by the expansion of Spartina alterniflora. In the present study, 28 quadrates along 5 tidal creks were sampled during Oc...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Assumed that the bedload sediment transport on the cross-shore tidal flat in the model, the depth-averaged tidal current velocity decreases as the distance from the open boundary (such as the spring low water) increases. However, since U100 (current velocity 1 m above the bottom bed) is negatively correlated to the water depth, the bedload sediment transport rate, which is proportional to the cubic of U100, increases as the distance from the open boundary decreases. Hence, the calculated variation of bed elevation caused by bedload transport is negative during the flood, in other words, the bed is scoured when the water level rises. This is obviously contrast to the field observation, demonstrated by many papers, that sediment transport landward during the flood. Then my question is that what has gone wrong in the process of bedload sediment transport on cross-shore tidal flats during the flood in the model?
Question
Now I only have the discrete wave parameters, such as wave height, wave period and wave direction. How can I use these parameters to calculate the sediment transport rate caused by wave actions on the tidal flats, an extreme-shallow water boundary with small bed elevation gradient and large width of tidal flats ? If I do not consider the wave breaking, is there any simplified formula or model can be used to calculate the sediment transport rate ?
Question
I have kept attention on the quantification of the contribution of each organic matter source to the coastal salt marshes. In general, carbon and nitrogen radioactive isotopes are used in the mixing model to calculate these contributions. However, these two indexes are not enough to solve the model when the number of the organic matter sources is larger than three, which might include autochthonous source like plant debris, and allochthonous sources as fluvial sediment, off-shore planktons, benthic algae, etc. In that way, C/N ratio can be an index used in mixing model for source partition and contribution calculation ?

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