Yang Li

Yang Li
Nagoya University | Meidai · School of Informatics and Sciences

PhD

About

42
Publications
17,777
Reads
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971
Citations
Citations since 2016
34 Research Items
846 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
2016201720182019202020212022050100150
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - February 2021
Nagoya University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
September 2016 - December 2019
University of Melbourne
Position
  • PostDoc Position
April 2014 - August 2016
Tamagawa University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Trust attitude is a social personality trait linked with the estimation of others’ trustworthiness. Trusting others, however, can have substantial negative effects on mental health, such as the development of depression. Despite significant progress in understanding the neurobiology of trust, whether the neuroanatomy of trust is linked with depress...
Preprint
The evolution of human altruism toward strangers remains a puzzle. While a possible explanation may exist in the concept of punishment for non-cooperators, its own evolution depends on how others evaluate punishment. In general, punishment is assessed differently based on the context, with negative evaluations in the public goods game with punishme...
Article
Full-text available
Nielsen et al. (1) argue that Van Doesum et al. (2) need to consider three points for their interpretation of a positive association between individual-level social mindfulness (SoMi) and environmental performance (EPI) at the country level (3). The association is weaker when 1) it is controlled for GDP and 2) when the data of three countries are r...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are social animals, but not everyone will be mindful of others to the same extent. Individual differences have been found, but would social mindfulness also be shaped by one’s location in the world? Expecting cross-national differences to exist, we examined if and how social mindfulness differs across countries. At little to no material cost...
Article
Despite the universality of cultural worldviews and self-esteem in providing people with general protection against death anxiety, recent empirical and anecdotal evidence suggests that death anxiety is more pronounced in East-Asian collectivist cultures than in Western individualist cultures. We propose that collectivists are encumbered by the addi...
Article
Full-text available
Norm enforcement may be important for resolving conflicts and promoting cooperation. However, little is known about how preferred responses to norm violations vary across cultures and across domains. In a preregistered study of 57 countries (using convenience samples of 22,863 students and non-students), we measured perceptions of the appropriatene...
Article
Full-text available
In the era when human activities can fundamentally alter the planetary climate system, a stable climate is a global commons. However, the need to develop the economy to sustain the growing human population poses the Climate Commons Dilemma. Although citizens may need to support policies that forgo their country's economic growth, they may instead b...
Article
Full-text available
Social and behavioral scientists have long investigated the relationship between interpersonal trust and features of the environment. However, it remains unclear how the micro-environment of relational distance (i.e., social proximity between two persons) interacts with the macro-environment of human ecology (i.e., social and natural environments)...
Article
Full-text available
Although punishment can promote cooperative behavior, the evolution of punishment requires benefits which override the cost. One possible source of the benefit of punishing uncooperative behavior is obtaining a positive evaluation. This study compares evaluations of punishers and non-punishers. Two hundred and thirty-four undergraduate students par...
Article
General trust, or trust in people with unknown personal backgrounds and with whom there is no interpersonal relationship, is key for the formation of an effective society. The Trust Game has long been a popular behavioral measurement of general trust; however, other measurements, such as the Faith Game, are increasingly attracting attention. Nevert...
Article
Full-text available
Norm talk is verbal communication that explicitly states or implicitly implies a social norm. To investigate its ability to shape cultural dynamics, 2 types of norm talk were examined: injunction, which explicitly states what should be done, and gossip, which implies a norm by stating an action approved or disapproved of by the communicator. In 2 e...
Article
Full-text available
Altruistic punishment following social norm violations promotes human cooperation. However, experimental evidence indicates that some forms of punishment are spiteful rather than altruistic. Using two types of punishment games and seven non-strategic games, we identified strong behavioural differences between altruistic and spiteful punishers. Altr...
Article
Full-text available
Why do great powers with benign intentions end up fighting each other in wars they do not seek? We utilize an incentivized, two-person “Preemptive Strike Game” (PSG) to explore how the subjective perception of great power interdependence shapes defensive aggression against persons from rival great powers. In Study 1, college students from the US (N...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Prosocial and proself predispositions dictate economic game players’ fast decisions but exert limited influence when game players take a longer time in making decisions. Prosocially predisposed individuals use the extended time to contemplate the risk of being exploited. Selfishly predisposed individuals are suggested to behave accordi...
Article
Full-text available
Ontogenic studies of human prosociality generally agree on that human prosociality increases from early childhood through early adulthood; however, it has not been established if prosociality increases beyond early adulthood. We examined a sample of 408 non-student residents from Tokyo, Japan, who were evenly distributed across age (20–59) and sex....
Data
Dataset including all variables used for analysis. (XLSX)
Data
Supplementary methods and tables. (PDF)
Data
Correlations between all variables used for analysis. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Despite the repeatedly raised criticism that findings in economic games are specific to situations involving trivial incentives, most studies that have examined the stake-size effect have failed to find a strong effect. Using three prisoner’s dilemma experiments, involving 479 non-student residents of suburban Tokyo and 162 students, we show here t...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Is human prosociality a consequence of cognitive control of selfish impulses? Alternatively, is it a default option that most people use unless they are cognitively persuaded that a given situation does not require them to behave prosocially? Our results support the latter argument. Participants with weaker cognitive control fairly sha...
Article
Full-text available
Social value orientations (SVOs) are economic preferences for the distribution of resources - prosocial individuals are more cooperative and egalitarian than are proselfs. Despite the social and economic implications of SVOs, no systematic studies have examined their neural correlates. We investigated the amygdala and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex...
Article
Full-text available
General trust constitutes a critical aspect of social capital that facilitates democratic governance and economic prosperity of a society. Despite its theoretical importance, attitudinal measures of general trust often fail to predict actual trusting behavior in laboratory testing. We suspected that the failure of currently available measures of tr...
Article
Full-text available
Homo economicus, a model for humans in neoclassical economics, is a rational maximizer of self-interest. However, many social scientists regard such a person as a mere imaginary creature. We found that 31 of 446 residents of relatively wealthy Tokyo suburbs met the behavioral definition of Homo economicus. In several rounds of economic games, parti...
Article
The strong reciprocity model of human cooperation (SRM) argues that strong reciprocators, who cooperate with others and punish non-cooperators, sustain within-group cooperation. However, the assumption that altruism and punishment are products of the same psychological mechanism of strong reciprocity has not been fully verified. Second-party punish...
Article
Full-text available
The strong reciprocity model of the evolution of human cooperation has gained some acceptance, partly on the basis of support from experimental findings. The observation that unfair offers in the ultimatum game are frequently rejected constitutes an important piece of the experimental evidence for strong reciprocity. In the present study, we have c...
Article
Full-text available
Japanese participants in Study 1 exhibited a self‐effacing tendency when no reason for their self‐evaluation was provided. However, they exhibited a self‐enhancing tendency when they were offered a monetary reward for the correct evaluation. In Study 2, Americans, especially American men, exhibited a self‐enhancing tendency whereas Japanese exhibit...
Article
Full-text available
This study tested the "city air" hypothesis, which posits that the social constraints prevalent in rural life are weaker in metropolitan areas, freeing metropolitan residents from pressure to suppress their pursuit of individual goals. To do so, we replicated Yamagishi et al.'s vignette study of pen choice. In the first study using a web-based surv...
Article
Two laboratory experiments demonstrated that Japanese participants did not conform to the majority unless negative social implications of not conforming were clear. When their behaviour had no implications for others, they rather exhibited preference for uniqueness. Results of Study 2 further demonstrated that participants' conformity to the majori...

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Projects (2)