Xueying Zhang

Xueying Zhang
Chinese Academy of Sciences | CAS · Institute of Zoology

About

42
Publications
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606
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Regulating sodium and water balances is crucial for survival of small, desert mammals. Studies demonstrate that the gut microbiota and their metabolites are involved in host energy homeostasis, but little is known on the interactions among salt loading, gut microbiota, and osmoregulation. The aim of this study was to fill this gap. Mongolian gerbil...
Article
Full-text available
Endothermic mammals have a high energy cost to maintain a stable and high body temperature (Tb , around 37°C). Thyroid hormones are a major regulator for energy metabolism and Tb . The gut microbiota is involved in modulating host energy metabolism. However, whether the interaction between the gut microbiota and thyroid hormones is involved in meta...
Article
Full-text available
Whether gut microbiota play a role in regulating host phenotypic plasticity in small mammals living in seasonal environments has rarely been examined. The present study, through an intermittent temperature acclimation model, indicates that both gut microbiota and their host were more adaptive after repeated acclimations. It also demonstrates that d...
Article
Full-text available
Desert rodents are faced with many challenges such as high dietary salt in their natural habitats and they have evolved abilities to conserve water and tolerate salt. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in water and salt balances in desert rodents are unknown. We hypothesized that desert rodents regulated water and salt bal...
Article
Full-text available
Many small mammals engage in coprophagy, or the behavior of consuming feces, as a means to meet nutritional requirements when feeding on low-quality foods. In addition to nutritional benefits, coprophagy may also help herbivores retain necessary gut microbial diversity and function, which may have downstream physiological effects, such as maintaini...
Preprint
Background In the long process of adaptive evolution, many small mammals engage in coprophagy, or the behavior of consuming feces, as a means to meet nutritional requirements when feeding on low-quality foods. In addition to nutritional benefits, coprophagy may also help herbivores retain necessary gut microbial diversity and function, which may ha...
Article
Full-text available
Gut microbiota play a critical role in orchestrating metabolic homeostasis of the host. However, the crosstalk between host and microbial symbionts in small mammals are rarely illustrated. We used male Brandt’s voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) to test the hypothesis that gut microbiota and host neurotransmitters, such as norepinephrine (NE), interact...
Article
Seasonal brain plasticity contributes to a variety of physiological and behavioral processes. We hypothesized that variations in GnRH expression and cell proliferation facilitated seasonal breeding and food hoarding. Here, we reported seasonal changes in sexual and social behavior, GnRH expression and brain cell proliferation, and the role of photo...
Article
Full-text available
Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported an error in the caption of Fig. 4.
Article
Full-text available
Background: Huddling is highly evolved as a cooperative behavioral strategy for social mammals to maximize their fitness in harsh environments. Huddling behavior can change psychological and physiological responses. The coevolution of mammals with their microbial communities confers fitness benefits to both partners. The gut microbiome is a key re...
Article
Full-text available
Huddling as social thermoregulatory behavior is commonly used by small mammals to reduce heat loss and energy expenditure in the cold. Our study aimed to determine the effect of huddling behavior on energy conservation, thermogenesis, core body temperature (Tb) regulation and body composition in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii). Adult captive...
Article
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Changes in environmental temperature affect the morphology and function of digestive tract in wild rodents. The small intestine is the main absorptive organ for nutrients, and its structure and function are plastic. To understand the response mechanisms of the structure and function of small intestinal mucosa to environmental temperature, we invest...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: The objective of the present study was to examine whether wild rodents exhibit diverse obesity susceptibility and what factors predispose subjects to this divergence in response to a high-fat diet (HFD). Methods: Sixty male and female Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) were fed an HFD for 8 weeks, and the upper (obesity prone [OP]...
Article
The metabolic thermogenesis plays important roles in thermoregulation, and it may be also involved in body fat regulation. The thermogenesis of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is largely affected by ambient temperature, but it is unclear if the roles in body fat regulation are dependent on the temperature. In the present study, uncoupling protein 1 (ucp...
Article
Full-text available
The maternal or paternal dietary composition can have important effects on various aspects of their offspring’s physiology. Studies from animal models and humans showed that a maternal high-fiber diet protected offspring against fat accumulation. However, little is known about how a maternal low-fiber diet modifies the metabolism of offspring in he...
Article
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Low insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is associated with improved longevity, but is paradoxically linked with several age-related diseases in humans. Insulin-like growth factor-1 has proven to be particularly beneficial to the brain, where it confers protection against features of neuronal and cognitive decline. While aging is characte...
Article
The perinatal period is critical for phenotypic plasticity in animals. Numerous physiological and environmental factors could chronically modify animals' growth and metabolic phenotype. Parental effects are a major driver of phenotypic plasticity. The present study was designed to explore the effects of parental body-mass on offspring growth, body-...
Article
Food quality can affect many physiological characteristics in small mammals. Reproduction is a highly energy-demanding period especially for the females to produce and feed their offspring. We hypothesized that energy intake was constrained at different levels in nonreproductive and reproductive females and thus they adopted diverse energy strategi...
Article
Body mass can affect almost all biological variables of animals. Parents with high body mass usually have large litter sizes. As a costly physiological process, reproduction is often accompanied by oxidative damage. The present study was designed to explore the effects of parental body mass on life history characteristics, reproductive output and o...
Article
Desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii) are the least known species in the genus Phodopus in ecology and physiology, and deserve scientific attention since they have the smallest body size but inhabit desert environments. Here, the responses in energy metabolism and reproductive function to short photoperiod in desert hamsters were investigated. Mal...
Article
Cold commonly affects growth and reproductive development in small mammals. Here, we test the hypothesis that low ambient temperature will affect growth and puberty onset, associated with altered hypothalamic Kiss-1 gene expression and serum leptin concentration in wild rodents. Male Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) were exposed to cold (4 ±...
Article
Full-text available
The present study was designed to explore the effects of high protein diet and reproduction on food intake and thermogenesis in Brandt's voles(Lasiopodomys brandtii). The adult female Brandt's voles were divided into four groups, non-reproduction and control diet (NCon, 17.7% of protein), non-reproduction and high protein diet (NHP, 36.6% of protei...
Article
Full-text available
To determine whether visceral fat (VF), independent of other confounders, is causally linked to intestinal tumorigenesis, we surgically removed visceral fat in Apc mice. At 15 weeks of age, male and female Apc mice were randomized to one of three groups: ad libitum, visceral fat removal (VF-) and ad libitum fed, or caloric restriction, and were stu...
Chapter
Limitation of food availability caused by seasonal reduction in vegetation or other food resources is a commonly encountered environmental threat for seasonal small mammals in the wild. In response to this adversity, small mammals inhabiting temperate regions and higher latitudes exhibit seasonal fluctuations in physiology, behavior, and morphology...
Article
Full-text available
Small mammals usually face energetic challenges, such as food shortage, in the field. They have thus evolved species-specific adaptive strategies for survival and reproductive success. In the present study, we examined male Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) for their physiological, behavioral, and neuronal responses to food deprivation (FD) an...
Article
Full-text available
Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment...
Article
Evidence has shown that postnatal undernutrition, overnutrition and cold stress are associated with imbalanced metabolic regulation as rodents achieve adulthood. In this study, we used a breeding colony of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii), a wild rodent species from the Inner Mongolia grasslands in China, to examine the effects of pre- and po...
Article
Full-text available
In most mammals, maternal body mass and fat mass increase during pregnancy due to hyperphagia. These physiological changes provide the fetus with energy and nutrients and prepare the mother for the high energetic demands of lactation. In the present study, metabolic changes in response to cold and pregnancy were examined in female Brandt's voles (L...
Article
Lactation is the most energetically demanding period in the female mammal's life. We measured maternal energy intake, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) content in brown adipose tissue (BAT), serum-leptin concentration, and litter growth in lactating Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) with different litter sizes. Litter mass was positively related to...
Article
Reproduction, especially lactation, is associated with major metabolic adaptive changes. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes and the roles of leptin during different periods of reproduction in primiparous Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii). Energy intake, thermogenic capacity and serum leptin levels were examined in non-reprodu...
Article
Lactation is the most energetically expensive period for mammals and is associated with increased metabolism and energy intake, but decreased thermogenic capacity. It is well known that small mammals increase both food intake and thermogenesis in the cold. The present study aimed to examine whether Brandt's voles Lasiopodomys brandtii could adjust...
Article
Environmental cues play important roles in the regulation of an animal's physiology and behavior. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that ambient temperature was a cue to induce adjustments in body mass, energy intake and thermogenic capacity, associated with changes in serum leptin levels in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys br...

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