Xuan Li

Xuan Li
New York University Shanghai · Applied Psychology

PhD

About

35
Publications
36,554
Reads
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294
Citations
Introduction
Xuan Li is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYU Shanghai and is an affiliated member of NYU-ECNU Institute for Social Development, and Department of Applied Psychology, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Her research focuses on fatherhood, parent-child interactions and relationships, and children and adolescents’ socioemotional development in contemporary Chinese societies. She is also interested in general issues pertaining to human development, family research, and gender studies. Xuan Li holds a Ph.D. and an MPhil in Social and Developmental Psychology from the University of Cambridge, and undergraduate degrees in Germanistik and Psychology from Peking University.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - present
New York University Shanghai
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
February 2015 - December 2015
German Youth Institute
Position
  • Research Associate
October 2010 - January 2015
University of Cambridge
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Full-text available
Chinese fathers, who have been understudied, traditionally were expected to act as emotionally distant educators and disciplinarians of their children as well as heads of the household. Their dual roles as parents and as men evolved during modern social transformations following divergent paths, with their parental role departing from the Confucian...
Article
Organized extracurricular activities (EAs) are prevalent among Chinese preschoolers, yet their role in children’s development is poorly understood. This study investigated the relations between EA participation and Chinese preschoolers’ school readiness (N = 343; Mage = 55.14 months) among a predominantly middle‐class sample. EA breadth had positiv...
Article
Full-text available
Fathers and fatherhood are increasingly visible in social science scholarship and public discourse, although the father’s different roles are yet to be integrated. Moreover, most existing studies on fathers and fatherhood focus on either European or North American fathers, or contemporary non-Western fathers; little is known about the historical ch...
Article
Full-text available
Parental emotion socialization is a dynamic process encompassing moment‐to‐moment fluctuations in parents’ emotional displays and responsiveness. This study attempted to examine the within‐ and between‐individual variation in fathers’ emotional expressivity during a real‐time father‐child interaction in Chinese families. Eighty‐five children (Mage...
Article
Previous research indicates that parental emotion socialization (ES) practices play important roles in adolescents’ social and emotional development. However, longitudinal studies testing bidirectional effects are relatively scarce. Additionally, most studies have focused on people from Western societies. In the current three-year, multi-informant,...
Article
Child participation in organized extracurricular activities (EAs) has attracted increasing scholarly attention. This study examined how child temperament and school readiness predicted EA participation trajectories among 345 Chinese preschoolers (MeanAge = 55.87 months at T1). On average, children showed linear increases in their overall EA partici...
Chapter
Full-text available
To gain greater insights into contemporary Chinese immigrant families in North America, it is imperative to understand the history of Chinese societies. This chapter provides an overview of the immigration history of Chinese families to Canada and the United States and the intracultural diversity in major Chinese societies (Mainland China, Taiwan,...
Chapter
Full-text available
Immigrant Chinese fathers remain severely under-researched despite their sizable and growing presence in host countries around the world and the recent progress in research on immigrant and ethnic minority fathers. In this chapter, we review the major themes and methods used in existing studies involving immigrant Chinese fathers and explore reason...
Article
Full-text available
Nationality constitutes a salient part of social categorization. However, little research has examined how people form nationality concepts and how it may be shaped by culture and experience. The current study aims to investigate essentialist beliefs about nationality in participants from two cultural origins: the United States and China. In both s...
Article
Full-text available
The fatherhood scholarship has made much theoretical progress over the past decades, yet existing models and concepts continue to draw primarily on WEIRD (western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic societies)-centric assumptions. This review uses demographically sizeable, culturally significant, yet understudied and under-theorized Chi...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Chinese ethnic group is the largest ethnic group in the world, and the Chinese people have been living and migrating to various countries globally. Although there has been research advancement on Chinese families, very limited attention has explored the nuances within this ethnic group. Based on Bronfenbrenner’s (1977; 1995) theoretical framewo...
Article
Co-parenting quality has frequently been linked to young children’s social–emotional functioning, but limited research has focused on the relationship between co-parenting and children’s early academic skills, or the underlying mechanisms through which co-parenting influences children’s development. Using data collected from urban China, the presen...
Article
How children spend time outside of school has consequences for their learning and development. Research on extracurricular participation has focused primarily on school-aged children and youth in Western societies. Yet, extracurricular activities are a common but understudied context of early development in Mainland China. In the present study, we...
Article
Given the importance of coparenting in children’s development, examining antecedents of coparenting quality is imperative. However, existing research has primarily focused on Western contexts. Using data collected from 714 Chinese families with preschool-aged children, the current study examined the associations between child temperament and copare...
Article
Full-text available
Comparisons of children’s perceptions of lesbian mothers to children’s perceptions of heterosexual parents are limited. To investigate whether children’s descriptions of their parents vary by family type (lesbian versus heterosexual) and biological relatedness, we interviewed 29 Finnish children raised by lesbian mothers or heterosexual parents. Pa...
Article
Full-text available
This study assesses interpersonal acceptance-rejection theory’s (IPARTheory’s) prediction that adults’ (both men’s and women’s) remembrances of parental (both maternal and paternal) rejection in childhood are likely to be associated with adults’ fear of intimacy, as mediated by adults’ psychological maladjustment and relationship anxiety. The study...
Article
This study explores the effects of romantic involvement and dating behaviors on adolescent academic and psychosocial functioning in Chinese societies, where adolescent dating is generally discouraged and believed to bear adverse outcomes. Adolescents (male = 48.6%; MeanAge = 15.20 years) from Taiwan (N = 1,081) and Mainland China (N = 684) were rec...
Preprint
Full-text available
Comparisons of children’s perceptions of lesbian mothers to children’s perceptions of heterosexual parents are limited. To investigate whether children’s descriptions of their parents vary by family type (lesbian versus heterosexual) and biological relatedness, we interviewed 29 Finnish children raised by lesbian mothers or heterosexual parents. Pa...
Preprint
Comparisons of children’s perceptions of lesbian mothers to children’s perceptions of heterosexual parents are limited. To investigate whether children’s descriptions of their parents vary by family type (lesbian versus heterosexual) and biological relatedness, we interviewed 29 Finnish children raised by lesbian mothers or heterosexual parents. Pa...
Article
Full-text available
Research on child development increasingly includes data on both parents and from different cultures. However, the relative importance of fathers versus mothers for child adjustment is still under debate. The present review compares the contributions of perceived paternal and maternal acceptance to various child adjustment indicators among samples...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract “New” or “active” fatherhood is increasingly discussed in the family research literature, yet it is unclear what these terms entail, and which factors associate with the practice of such “active fatherhood”. With the “AID:A II” survey (Growing Up in Germany: Everyday Life, Wave 2) the present paper uses the most up-to-date data that chart...
Chapter
Full-text available
In this chapter the authors focus on the way in which contemporary Chinese men (re)negotiate the meanings and emergent norms that apply to being a good parent. On the basis of the wen-wu conceptualization of Chinese masculinity and of the recent history of Chinese fatherhood, as well as empirical data from multiple regions of reform-era China, it i...
Article
Full-text available
http://intersections.anu.edu.au/issue39/li.html
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: Existing literature on adolescent dating behavior and its correlates rely primarily on samples from Euro-American societies, where adolescent dating is normative. So far, little attention has been given to the romantic relationships among adolescents in Chinese societies, although evidence has suggested that the social realities and cul...
Article
Full-text available
Sandy To’s China’s Leftover Women zooms in on a particular subgroup of Chinese women who, on the surface, are the beneficiaries of China’s booming, globalizing economy and the socialist gender equality policies. To’s female informants are all young, cosmopolitan, well-educated, and exceedingly achieved: One could easily imagine them being heralded...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the moderating influence of parental power and prestige on the relationship between parental acceptance and the psychological adjustment of Chinese adolescents. Data were collected from 335 urban Chinese adolescents (45% boys) ages 11 through 16 (M = 13.57 years). The adolescents responded to questionnaires measuring their perce...
Article
Full-text available
Our study is the first study to explore the transformation of Chinese gender stereotypes over a thirty-year period. Based on the field research conducted in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China, and supplemental data in Shanghai, Beijing, and Nanjing, we examine the way men and women's supposed "essence" has been objectified in folk i...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Understanding parenting and child development in the rapidly changing Chinese contexts.
Project
Another part of our current work focuses on how people organize their conceptual knowledge about social groups, and how that influences the assumptions we make about individuals. Categories allow us to organize knowledge and generalize from limited experience, thus simplifying the bewildering array of information available to us. Essentialist thinking has been proposed as a pervasive conceptual bias resulting in a default assumption that members of a category share an underlying, invisible principle, property or nature that determines category membership and causes category members to exhibit a range of both observable and nonobvious shared properties. Social essentialism is the tendency to make essentialist assumptions about social groups (e.g., Black people, Catholics, Red Sox fans). We are particularly interested in the circumstances under which these essentialist beliefs develop or change, as well as their meaning and consequences in our social lives.