Wolfgang Neubauer

Wolfgang Neubauer
Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology

PD Professor Mag. Dr.

About

312
Publications
86,879
Reads
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1,991
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2015 - present
VIAS - Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science
Position
  • Vice Director
April 2010 - present
January 2004 - November 2015
University of Vienna
Position
  • Senior Researcher
Education
January 1994 - January 2000
University of Vienna, Austria
Field of study
  • Prehistoric Archaeology, Archaeometry and Mathematics
October 1985 - February 1993
TU Wien
Field of study
  • Mathematics and Computer Science
October 1984 - February 1993
University of Vienna
Field of study
  • Prehistoric Archaeology

Publications

Publications (312)
Article
Full-text available
Middle Neolithic circular enclosures, known as Kreisgrabenanlage (KGA), are the oldest known monumental sites in Central Europe, dating roughly to 4850-4600/4500 BC. These large prehistoric monuments are mainly discovered by aerial archaeology and have been investigated by geophysical prospection and archaeological excavations since the 1960s. The...
Article
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The non-invasive detection and digital documentation of buried archaeological heritage by means of geophysical prospection is increasingly gaining importance in modern field archaeology and archaeological heritage management. It frequently provides the detailed information required for heritage protection or targeted further archaeological research...
Article
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The Roman site of Carnuntum was once a flourishing center on the frontiers of the Roman Empire. In its heyday as the capital of the province of Pannonia superior, Carnuntum probably covered an area of almost 9 km². The whole site was divided into a military settlement (castra and canabae legionis) and a civil town (municipium/colonia). Through a la...
Article
– Usually only GPR reflection amplitudes are imaged, while GPR data contain far more information. – Multi-trace GPR coherency visualisations offer new insights into structures otherwise hardly visible. – Image fusing permits the combined display of different GPR data attributes (amplitude and coherency).
Article
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In the framework of an archaeological prospection case study conducted at the Swedish Iron Age site of Uppåkra near Lund, a large number of anomalies caused by buried archaeological remains were detected using extensive magnetic surveys. Written sources report that the Swedish army under Field marshal Gustav Horn had established a camp near the vil...
Article
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The Benedictine Convent of Saint John at Müstair is a UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the eastern part of Switzerland close to South Tyrol’s border (Italy). Known as a well-preserved Carolingian building complex housing Carolingian and Romanesque frescoes, the convent has received much academic attention. However, all research activities so f...
Article
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Large parts of the urban layout of the abandoned Roman town of Bassianae (in present-day Serbia) are still discernible on the surface today due to the deliberate and targeted quarrying of the Roman foundations. In 2014, all of the town's intramural (and some extramural) areas were surveyed using aerial photography, ground-penetrating radar, and mag...
Article
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The Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science (VIAS) was founded within the University of Vienna in 1992 as a forward-looking transdisciplinary institution. VIAS aims to develop and integrate methods from the natural sciences in a dynamic relationship with the culture-oriented investigative frameworks of archaeology, and to provide support, knowl...
Article
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The potential of large-scale, non-invasive prospection methods has been widely recognized in archaeology in recent years. Their outstanding possibilities for the exploration of urban centres have been realised early on and applied at selected sites. The ‘ArchPro Carnuntum’ project stands out for its extensive investigation of a Roman provincial cap...
Article
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Schönwerth Castle. Archaeological Re-prospection of a Deserted Medieval Lowland Castle in Volders, Tyrol Schönwerth Castle, a deserted late medieval castle in Volders, Tyrol, has completely disappeared today and is only known from some early modern maps and illustrations. As long ago as 1997, however, it was possible to document its remains by mean...
Data
This is not the final version of the supplementary data files. Copy editing was undertaken on the digital files. To access the final supplementary files visit - https://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue55/4/supp-text.html
Article
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A series of massive geophysical anomalies, located south of the Durrington Walls henge monument, were identified during fluxgate gradiometer survey undertaken by the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project (SHLP). Initially interpreted as dewponds, these data have been re-evaluated, along with information on similar features revealed by archaeological...
Article
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Borre in Norway is famous for its Late Nordic Iron and Viking Age (AD 400–1050) monumental burial mounds. Recently, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have revealed three large structures close to the mound cemetery. Their unusual layout and size, and location within such a prominent burial site, suggest that they were halls—high-status buildin...
Chapter
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Archaeological research is dealing with the documentation and analysis of archaeological entities in space and time. During this process information is linked with a specific location and a time stamp. An archaeological Information System (AIS) organizes archaeological entities and associated information according to their specific location using a...
Article
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Between 2016 and 2018, two large-scale geophysical survey campaigns were conducted at Pliska, the first Early Medieval capital of Bulgaria (7th – 11th century AD). The aim was to document yet unknown archaeological remains, mainly in the central Inner City of Pliska, to achieve a better understanding of the urban layout and the successive construct...
Article
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The technical advancements of the past decade have rendered motorised, high-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigations increasingly popular for archaeological research and cultural heritage management in Norway. However, the agricultural use of most survey areas limits the time available for fieldwork in spring and autumn and thus red...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Neubauer, W., Bornik, A., Wallner, M. and Verhoeven, G.J.J. (2019), “Novel volume visualisation of GPR data inspired by medical applications”, in Bonsall, J. (Ed.), New global perspectives on archaeological prospection: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Archaeological Prospection, 28 August – 1 September 2019, Sligo - Ireland, Arc...
Article
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p>This paper describes developments in virtual archaeology that started in a research project about the possible astronomical entrance orientation of Neolithic circular ditch systems (German Kreisgrabenanlagen, KGA) of Lower Austria. Starting from data analysis in a Geographical Information System (GIS), we will cover a simple way of modelling, and...
Article
Survey and sampling at the classic single-entranced henge monument at Castle Dykes, in North Yorkshire, has revealed traces of circular timber structures, interpreted as later prehistoric roundhouses, in the immediate vicinity and within the henge. Coring of the waterlogged silts of the internal ditch has produced considerable environmental data: p...
Chapter
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In the last few years, the open-source desktop planetarium program Stellarium has become ever more popular for research and dissemination of results in Cultural Astronomy. In this time we (LBI ArchPro and TU Wien) have added significant capabilities for applications in Cultural Astronomy to the program, in particular a way to allow virtual 3D explo...
Chapter
Over the course of four years (2012–2015) the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archeology (LBI ArchPro), in collaboration with the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) and on behalf of the provincial government of Lower Austria, has conducted the comprehensive, non-invasive archaeological pro...
Conference Paper
The Harris Matrix (HM) is the fundamental diagrammatic representation of relative time for an archaeological site and the de facto standard for the representation of a stratigraphic sequence-the backbone for archaeological stratigraphy. It displays all uniquely identified units of stratification in a sequential diagram representing their relative t...
Conference Paper
The non-invasive prospection of our archaeological heritage is one of the main tasks of modern archaeology and often provides the necessary bases for further activities, such as special protection or intensified research. Geophysical prospections using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) are an invaluable tool for the non-destructive exploration of arch...
Article
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Since 2010 the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project (SHLP) has undertaken extensive archaeological prospection across much of the landscape surrounding Stonehenge. These remote sensing and geophysical surveys have revealed a significant number of new sites and landscape features whilst providing new information on many previously known monuments. T...
Article
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full-text view: http://rdcu.be/sYVT The complementary use of various archaeological prospection data sets offers a series of new possibilities for the investigation of prehistoric settlements. In addition to the separate interpretations of the single methods, the implementation of image fusion provides an additional tool to obtain an even higher d...
Article
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Traditionally, ground‐penetrating radar (GPR) measurements for near‐surface geophysical archaeological prospection are conducted with single‐channel systems using GPR antennae mounted in a cart similar to a pushchair, or towed like a sledge behind the operator. The spatial data sampling of such GPR devices for the non‐invasive detection and investi...
Article
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In September 2010, an exceptionally large cooking-pit site was discovered by means of geophysical prospection at Lunde in Vestfold County, Norway. The site contains in excess of 1000 cooking-pits and is, to date, one of the largest of its kind discovered in Scandinavia. Features known as cooking-pits are ubiquitous on Northern European archaeologic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
A geophysical survey done by ground penetrating radar (GPR) of a middle-Neolithic triple ditch circular enclosure (German: "Kreisgrabenanlage") and its environs showed high reflections at 1.3 to 1 .7-meter depth, which could not be explained by geophysical methods alone. These reflections especially occur at the locations of the posts belonging to...
Article
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Thirty years ago the integrated archaeological survey of Roman sites was unusual. The villa rustica at Halbturn was the first Roman site in Austria to be extensively surveyed. After three decades of methodological and technical advances, archaeologists are now able to apply non-invasive archaeological survey techniques on a landscape scale. Since 2...
Article
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Are they all stray finds? Metal detector finds and the potential for preserved contexts below the plough soil In Vestfold County we have since 2013 seen a marked rise in metal detecting finds being delivered to the county archaeologists by amateur detectorists. These finds are a source of both joy and grief for archaeologists all over Norway. Shou...
Article
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Large-scale, high-resolution geophysical data sets offer new possibilities for the comprehensive study of archaeological landscapes. In addition to the mere archaeological component, these data sets carry palaeoenvironmental information about the study area. Such information was known but rarely used in conventional geophysical surveys, which is ma...
Article
Following magnetometry and ground penetrating radar surveys, a geoarchaeological field evaluation was carried out at the Iron Age burial mound of Rom in Slagendalen, Vestfold County, Norway, in order to assess the accuracy of the geophysical data interpretation and to investigate specific questions that have arisen during data interpretation. The e...
Article
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In 2014, a team of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology, in collaboration with Holstebro Museum, conducted a geophysical archaeological prospection pilot study at several Viking Age and medieval sites in West Jutland, Denmark; sites that had been discovered earlier by aerial archaeology. The high-res...
Article
Landscape geophysical survey around the small upland ‘henge’ at Yarnbury, Grassington, North Yorkshire revealed few anthropogenic features around the enclosure but did identify a small rectangular structure in the same field. Sample trenching of this feature, radiocarbon and archaeomagnetic dating proved it to be an earlier Neolithic post and wattl...
Chapter
Neubauer, W., 2017. Kreisgrabenanlagen (4850/4750 – 4650/4500 BC), in: Lenneis, E. (Ed.), Erste Bauerndörfer – älteste Kultbauten. Die frühe und mittlere Jungsteinzeit in Niederösterreich. Archäologie Niederösterreichs 1. Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien, 276-296.
Chapter
Full-text available
The title of this paper refers, obliquely, to Robin Osborne’s (1987) influential book on the Greek city and its countryside “Classical Landscape with Figures”. ' We start with this reference, in part because much of the content of this paper will refer to issues relating to the interpretation of archaeological land/cityscapes, but also because Osbo...
Conference Paper
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Abstract—The first recorded crowdsourcing activity was in 1714 [1], with intermittent public event occurrences up until the millennium when such activities become widespread, spanning multiple domains. Crowdsourcing, however, is relatively novel as a methodology within virtual environment studies, in archaeology, and within the heritage domains whe...