Wilson Milton Were

Wilson Milton Were
World Health Organization WHO | who · Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health and ageing(MCA)

MB.Ch B, M. Med. Paediatrics and Child Health

About

36
Publications
10,657
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1,767
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Introduction
Wilson Milton Were currently works as a Medical Officer, Child Health Services at the Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health (MCA), World Health Organization WHO. Wilson is responsible for child health policy, guidance and quality of care and does research in Policy, Health Systems, Epidemiology, International Health and Infectious Diseases. Their most recent publication is 'Leadership, action, learning and accountability to deliver quality care for women, newborns and children'.
Additional affiliations
September 2008 - present
World Health Organization WHO
Position
  • Medical Officer, Child Healath Services

Publications

Publications (36)
Preprint
Full-text available
Background There are currently no global recommendations on a parsimonious and robust set of indicators that can be measured routinely or periodically to monitor quality of hospital care for children and young adolescents. We describe a systematic methodology used to prioritize and define a core set of such indicators and their metadata for progres...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Assessing quality of healthcare is integral in determining progress towards equitable health outcomes worldwide. Using the WHO ‘Standards for improving quality of care for children and young adolescents in health facilities’ as a reference standard, we aimed to evaluate existing tools that assess quality of care for children. Methods...
Article
Full-text available
Recognizing the need for action, the national governments of Bangladesh, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, India, Malawi, Nigeria, Uganda and United Republic of Tanzania, together with WHO, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), implementation partners and other stakeholders, have established the Netw...
Article
The Pediatric Task Force reviewed all questions submitted by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) member councils in 2010, reviewed all council training materials and resuscitation guidelines and algorithms, and conferred on recent areas of interest and controversy. We identified a few areas where there were key differences...
Article
Full-text available
Wilson Were and colleagues explain why the global community should continue to invest in children’s health, to complete the unfinished child survival agenda and tackle the emerging child health priorities Globally, deaths in children aged under 5 years declined by approximately 50% from 12.7 million in 1990 to 6.3 million in 2013, but progress has...
Article
Full-text available
In 2015, as we review progress towards Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), despite significant progress in reduction of mortality, we still have unacceptably high numbers of maternal and newborn deaths globally. Efforts over the past decade to reduce adverse outcomes for pregnant women and newborns have been directed at increasing skilled birth at...
Article
Full-text available
Studies in the last decade have identified major deficiencies in the care of seriously ill children in hospitals in developing countries. Effective implementation of clinical guidelines is an important strategy for improving quality of care. In 2005 the World Health Organization produced the Pocket Book of Hospital Care for Children - Guidelines fo...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxaemia is commonly associated with mortality in developing countries, yet feasible and cost-effective ways to address hypoxaemia receive little or no attention in current global health strategies. Oxygen treatment has been used in medicine for almost 100 years, but in developing countries most seriously ill newborns, children and adults do not...
Article
Full-text available
HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria are 3 major global public health threats and cause substantial morbidity, mortality, negative socioeconomic impact, and human suffering. Despite the significant increase in financial support and recent progress in addressing these 3 diseases, important obstacles and unmet priorities remain. Disease-specific inter...
Article
Full-text available
An increasing number of malaria-endemic African countries are rapidly scaling up malaria prevention and treatment. To have an initial estimate of the impact of these efforts, time trends in health facility records were evaluated in selected districts in Ethiopia and Rwanda, where long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) and artemisinin-based combinati...
Article
In the January issue of TM & IH D’Alessandro et al. (2005) recommend to reconsider the use of ACTs under the home-based management of malaria (HBM) approach as the potential benefits might be outweighed by negative consequences. There is always a balance that has to be struck in public health about weighing up the benefit and risk of moving forward...
Article
Referral of severely ill children to hospital is key in the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI). In rural Uganda, we documented the caretakers' ability to complete referral to hospital from 12 health facilities. Of 227 children, only 63 (28%) had completed referral after 2 weeks, at a median cost of 8.85 US dollars (range 0.40-89.00)....
Article
Full-text available
To quantify the main reasons for referral of infants and children from first-level health facilities to referral hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa and to determine what further supplies, equipment, and legal empowerment might be needed to manage such children when referral is difficult. In an observational study at first-level health facilities in Ug...
Article
Chloroquine (CQ) resistance was first documented in Uganda in 1988. Subsequent surveillance of antimalarial drug resistance, conducted by the Ugandan Ministry of Health and several research organizations, suggests that resistance to CQ is now widespread, reaching critical levels in many areas of the country. In June 2000, the Ministry of Health hel...
Article
Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy, pharmacokinetic profiles and nephrotoxicity of once daily versus thrice daily doses of intramuscular gentamicin in infants and children. Design: A randomized trial. Subjects: Patients between ages of one month and eight years with clinically suspected or proven severe bacterial infection with no prior...

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