William Daniel Snyder

William Daniel Snyder
University of Tuebingen | EKU Tübingen · Institute for Prehistory and Early History and Medieval Archaeology

Master of Science
PhD student in prehistoric archaeology and anthropology, studying humanity's cultural and biological origins.

About

13
Publications
1,021
Reads
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12
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
12 Citations
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Introduction
Evolution of human culture and cognition, part of ERC Starting Grant STONECULT Project under supervision by Dr. Claudio Tennie
Education
October 2015 - May 2018
University of Tuebingen
Field of study
  • Scientific Archaeology
August 2011 - May 2015
Emory University
Field of study
  • Anthropology and Human Biology

Publications

Publications (13)
Preprint
This preprint is a proceedings paper invited by the Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte (EN. The Berlin Society for Anthropology, Ethnology, and Prehistory) and has been submitted to the publication Mitteilungen der Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte.
Poster
Full-text available
Cumulative culture of know-how is a phenomenon unique – among living primates – to modern humans and has been fundamental in the survival and success of Homo sapiens (e.g., [1]). Cumulative culture is based on the social transmission of know-how information [2] across individuals, typically via mechanisms like copying, teaching, and language. Over...
Presentation
One of the key endeavors in prehistoric archaeology is the reconstruction of past behavior. In reconstructing the past behavior (such as stone toolmaking) of extinct hominin species and early modern humans, it is also theoretically possible to gain insights into the cognitive underpinnings (e.g., particular neurocognitive mechanisms, intentions and...
Article
Full-text available
Early stone tool production, or knapping, techniques are claimed to be the earliest evidence for cultural transmission in the human lineage. Previous experimental studies have trained human participants to knap in conditions involving opportunities for cultural transmission. Subsequent knapping was then interpreted as evidence for a necessity of th...
Article
Full-text available
Overview Video games are unparalleled as an interactive medium and can serve as potential educational tools through intelligent game design and the players’ immersion in the game world (e.g., Mayo 2009; Rassalle 2021; Rubio-Campillo 2020; Winter 2021). At the same time, video games, like any media, might also misinform (e.g., Aron 2020; Dennis 2019...
Preprint
Full-text available
Early stone tools are claimed to be the earliest evidence for the cultural transmission of toolmaking techniques, and with it, cumulative culture. This claim has ostensibly been supported by experimental studies wherein modern humans learned stone tool production (knapping) in conditions that provided opportunities for cultural transmission. Howeve...
Article
Full-text available
The critical examination of current hypotheses is one of the key ways in which scientific fields develop and grow. Therefore, any critique, including Haidle and Schlaudt’s article, “Where Does Cumulative Culture Begin? A Plea for a Sociologically Informed Perspective,” represents a welcome addition to the literature. However, critiques must also be...
Presentation
Stone tools are a pervasive element of the archaeological record of the human lineage from at least 2.6 Ma until modern times. The replication of prehistoric stone tools in an experimental setting is an important method for gaining insight into the manufacture of the tools themselves and the culture and behavior of their hominin manufacturers. Raw...
Poster
Hypothesis testing in experimental archaeology is a valuable tool for improving our understanding of the evolution of human behaviors and culture. By replicating the end-products of hominin behaviors (here, stone tools), we can fine-tune our hypotheses about the processes – biological, neurological, cultural, or otherwise - that led to their manufa...
Preprint
Full-text available
While culture is widespread in the animal kingdom, human culture has been claimed to be special due to being cumulative. It is currently debated which cognitive abilities support cumulative culture, but behavior copying is one of the main abilities proposed. One important source of contention is the presence or absence of behavior copying in our cl...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The aim of this project is to study toolmaking behaviors and artefactual outcomes of totally naive humans - i.e., in the total absence of copying social learning opportunities.