William Magee

William Magee
University of Toronto | U of T · Department of Sociology

PhD

About

24
Publications
2,930
Reads
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Introduction
William Magee is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, University of Toronto. His research tends to focus on social psychological processes related to health and emotions, broadly defined.

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests that the way individuals are oriented towards the future is deeply embedded in their psychology, shaping how they perceive and react to opportunities and threats, even at unconscious levels. We argue that exposures to opportunities and threats over the life course can shape future orientation at a deep level, and that word-valence...
Article
Background: People who smoke tend to report higher levels of psychological distress than those who do not smoke. However, studies suggest that smoking reduces many sub-dimensions of distress, including depressive symptoms. A negative (i.e. depression reducing) effect of smoking on depressive symptoms might be observed in survey panel data only afte...
Article
American men tend to score slightly higher on measures of self-esteem than American women. We ask whether this is because of gender differences in responsiveness to the positive and negative phrasing of self-related survey statements used to assess self-esteem. We argue that self-enhancing and self-derogatory tendencies can be in- ferred from wordi...
Article
Although sociologists have long been interested in the stratification of emotions, the occupational stratification of anger has been investigated in only a few general population studies. Through analyses of data representative of workers in Toronto we evaluate the hypothesis that workplace hierarchical position, defined by supervisory level, has a...
Article
Studies have found blacks in the USA report lower levels of anger-out and higher levels of anger-in than whites. However, most of the research on anger expression has been based on data from limited samples. The current study investigates the black–white difference in anger-in and anger-out in a sample representative of Americans aged 40 and older....
Chapter
PurposeThe malicious impulse is a phenomenon that lies in the theoretical and ontological space between emotion and action. In this chapter, we probe this space. In the empirical part of this work, we evaluate the hypothesis that middle-level supervisors will be more likely than non-supervisory workers and top-level supervisors to report an impulse...
Article
Job pride can be elicited by successful praiseworthy action, such as working to overcome obstacles to reach a desired work-related outcome. In contrast, job satisfaction may be elicited by receipt of job-related resources even in the absence of effort. Thus one difference between job pride and job satisfaction is that pride is likely to reflect wel...
Article
The tendency for women in Canada and the United States to report being more satisfied than men with their jobs is considered paradoxical because women, on average, receive fewer job-related resources than men. Theory and research suggest that the magnitude of the gender difference that underlies that paradox may increase as levels of negative affec...
Article
Research on subjective wellbeing includes studies of both domain-related and global distress. The mental health literature, though, focuses almost exclusively on global distress. This seems to be partly due to a common belief that psychological distress, and the moods that comprise distress, necessarily lack referential content. However, if that we...
Article
Full-text available
Studies have found anger at others at home (AOH) to be associated with job-related stress, and work-to-home interference (WHI). These findings suggest that WHI may mediate the translation of stress about work into AOH. This study investigates the associations of work-related worries, and anger about work, with worries about home and AOH. WHI is inv...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the large number of immigrants in Canada’s labor force, studies of immigrants to Canada have devoted insufficient attention to how country of birth and race are related to job satisfaction. Using data from a general population telephone survey of English-speaking workers in Toronto (n = 659), we investigate job satisfaction differences betw...
Article
Full-text available
We investigate the association between the residential concentration of Chinese in Toronto and discrimination as experienced and perceived by Chinese immigrant residents. A unique aspect of this study is our focus on perceived employment discrimination. We find that Chinese immigrants living in neighbourhoods with a high concentration of other Chin...
Article
Social autonomy is the tendency to assert one’s opinion in the face of opposition. This paper investigates the social roots of that tendency by focusing on the long-term effects of childhood family background on midlife social autonomy. The effects of two aspects of family background are investigated—socioeconomic background and childhood household...
Article
Effects of illness and disability on job separation result from both voluntary and involuntary processes. Voluntary processes range from the reasoned actions of workers who weigh illness and disability in their decision-making, to reactive stress-avoidance responses. Involuntary processes include employer discrimination against ill or disabled work...
Article
Conditioning theories, stress theories and social psychological theories each suggest that negative life experiences should influence phobia onset, though the patterns of effects suggested by each type of theory are different. Few previous studies have estimated the effects of a broad enough range of life experiences on onset of multiple types of p...
Article
Data on eight specific fears representing DSM-III-R simple phobia were analysed to evaluate: (a) their prevalence and (b) the validity of subtypes of specific phobia defined by DSM-IV. A modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered to a probability sample of 8098 community respondents. Correlates of response...
Article
We present a strategy for using longitudinal survey data to identify life history pathways linked with mental health outcomes. The central aim is to begin with richly detailed descriptions of individual lives and, from them, to discern generalizable features of aggregates of multiple lives. Conceptual principles guiding the organization and interpr...
Article
Data are presented on the general population prevalences, correlates, comorbidities, and impairments associated with DSM-III-R phobias. Analysis is based on the National Comorbidity Survey. Phobias were assessed with a revised version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Lifetime (and 30-day) prevalence estimates are 6.7% (and 2.3%)...
Article
The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of DSM-III-R panic disorder and to describe its correlates. The study was part of the National Comorbidity Survey, the first psychiatric epidemiologic survey of the entire U.S. population and the first to use DSM-III-R criteria for diagnosis. The 8,098 survey respondents, aged 15-54 years, were...
Article
Although previous research has shown that childhood adversity has long-term effects on adult depression, little is known about the causal pathways involved in these effects. In this report data from a two-wave longitudinal survey of the U.S. household population are used to study these pathways as they affect the association between childhood famil...
Chapter
The investigation of stress and stress-buffering effects has been central to research on psychosocial determinants of mental illness since at least the early 1960s. Most of the early work in this tradition focused on the gross effects of life events (Dohrenwend & Dohrenwend, 1974). There was little interest in stress-buffering effects, although som...
Article
Synopsis The long-term relationships between various forms of childhood adversity and adult episodes of major depression are explored in a representative household survey of the United States adult (age 25 +) population. Seven of the eight childhood adversities considered are significantly associated with recent (12-month) episodes of depression. T...