William Macey

William Macey
Culturefactors · NA

About

28
Publications
108,131
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
5,761
Citations

Publications

Publications (28)
Chapter
This chapter serves as an introduction to the book and more specifically to introduce several key themes that characterize the shift from the decades-old traditions in conducting employee surveys to a more inclusive perspective on how organizations listen and more broadly sense employee perceptions regarding employee well-being and engagement—with...
Article
In contrast to the view that survey key driver analysis (SKDA) is a misused and blind empirical process, we suggest it is a reasonable, hypothesis-driven approach that builds on cumulative knowledge drawn from both the literature and practice, and requires reasoned judgment about the relationships of individual items to the constructs they represen...
Article
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to argue in support of a model that shows how four key HRM practices focused on engagement influence organizational climate, job demands and job resources, the psychological experiences of safety, meaningfulness and availability at work, employee engagement, and individual, group and organizational performance...
Book
The fields of organizational climate and organizational culture have co-existed for several decades with very little integration between the two. In Organizational Climate and Culture: An Introduction to Theory, Research, and Practice, Mark G. Ehrhart, Benjamin Schneider, and William H. Macey break down the barriers between these fields to encourag...
Article
We develop a framework in which internal employees’ diagnoses of their firm’s service climate determine their role behavior towards customers and, ultimately, customer satisfaction, loyalty, retention and shareholder value. Elements of the framework include: (1) foundation issues (fundamental human behavior issues like the presence of necessary res...
Article
Full-text available
Organizational climate and organizational culture theory and research are reviewed. The article is first framed with definitions of the constructs, and preliminary thoughts on their interrelationships are noted. Organizational climate is briefly defined as the meanings people attach to interrelated bundles of experiences they have at work. Organiza...
Chapter
Business leaders can face unique challenges in attracting, retaining, and developing an engaged workforce in today's global organizations. However, insights can be provided by examining a firm's Employee Value Proposition (EVP) as seen by employees, as well as carefully exploring drivers of employee engagement to equip executives and managers to ov...
Chapter
Organizational climate research: Achievements and the road ahead The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to the topic of organizational climate, setting the stage for more specific discussions of climate and culture in the remainder of the Handbook . This introduction covers two general topics: (1) major achievements in research o...
Chapter
Providing both practical advice, tools, and case examples, Employee Engagement translates best practices, ideas, and concepts into concrete and practical steps that will change the level of engagement in any organization. Explores the meaning of engagement and how engagement differs significantly from other important yet related concepts like satis...
Chapter
talking points - rethinking engagement in organizations;overt displays of energy - persistence, adaptability, proactivity and role expansion;people's urge to being competent and successful;employee engagement principles;engagement requiring supportive and fair work environment;engagement occurs - people use their important skills in a way aligned w...
Chapter
How Engagement Makes a Difference and WhatEngagement IsHow an Engaged Workforce Creates Positive Financial Consequences for OrganizationsOn High Performance Work Environments: Four Principles for Creating an Engaged WorkforceThe Remainder of the Book
Chapter
Disengagement: Early Unmet Expectations at WorkThe Nature and Trajectory of BurnoutEffective Coping With BurnoutAdditional Stress Factors and DisengagementRemedies and InterventionsResistance to Change and Engagement: Another Dark Side of EngagementHow Should Engagement Initiatives be Communicated?Conclusion
Chapter
What is Organizational Culture?Creating a Culture for Engagement: How People are Valued in OrganizationsThe Role of Culture in Creating Strategic Employee EngagementSummary
Chapter
Survey Results InterpretationSurvey Results FeedbackPreparing the Organization for Taking ActionHow Much Measurable Change is Possible?Actual Changes That Build and Maintain EngagementSummary
Article
Full-text available
The climate for service is conceptualized and studied as a correlate of customer satisfaction and corporate financial and market performance, with customer satisfaction as a mediator of the climate-performance relationship. Brief reviews of relevant literatures yield three hypotheses: (1) customer satisfaction will be a significant correlate of org...
Article
We emphasize that science and practice issues are equally salient when pursuing thinking and research on employee engagement. We agree with much of what the commentaries have to say, especially that organizational competitive advantage is the relevant focus of engagement research and practice and that engagement is not a new construct but one that...
Article
Full-text available
The meaning of employee engagement is ambiguous among both academic researchers and among practitioners who use it in conversations with clients. We show that the term is used at different times to refer to psychological states, traits, and behaviors as well as their antecedents and outcomes. Drawing on diverse relevant literatures, we offer a seri...
Article
Full-text available
M M J u l y / A u g u s t 2 0 0 7 R 29 C orporate service intelligence (CSI) is the degree to which a company is organized to provide extraordinary levels of service quality to its customers. Service quality is most visible at the front lines— where the company meets the customer—but the essence of CSI is in an organization's design, communications...
Article
We develop a framework in which internal employees' diagnoses of their firm's service climate determine their role behavior towards customers and, ultimately, customer satisfaction, loyalty, retention and shareholder value. Elements of the framework include: (1) foun dation issues (fundamental human behavior issues like the presence of necessary re...
Article
80 undergraduates were asked to provide frequency judgments for words that appeared in 1 or both of 2 successive lists. Modality (auditory or visual) of items common to both lists was the same or different between the 2 lists. Lists were separated by either 0 or 7 min. As expected by the multiple-trace hypothesis of frequency estimation, frequency...
Article
Established bigram versatility (BV) as measured by the number of different words in which a bigram appeared. Anagram solution as a function of BV and bigram frequency was tested using 24 undergraduates as Ss. An inverse relationship between BV and anagram solution time was found. Results are discussed within the context of a reduced search area for...

Network

Cited By