William Gough

William Gough
University of Hawaii · Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

20
Publications
6,341
Reads
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281
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
277 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
Although gigantic body size and obligate filter feeding mechanisms have evolved in multiple vertebrate lineages (mammals and fishes), intermittent ram (lunge) filter feeding is unique to a specific family of baleen whales: rorquals. Lunge feeding is a high cost, high benefit feeding mechanism that requires the integration of unsteady locomotion (i....
Article
Full-text available
Recent changes in the South African marine ecosystem and the introduction of an experimental octopus fishery have resulted in an unsustainably high rate of fatal Bryde's whale entanglements. Using suction-cup attached bio-loggers, we identified a previously undescribed feeding behavior used by Bryde's whales to catch prey, and this behavior may mak...
Article
Recent changes in the South African marine ecosystem and the introduction of an experimental octopus fishery have resulted in an unsustainably high rate of fatal Bryde's whale entanglements. Using suction-cup attached bio-loggers, we identified a previously undescribed feeding behavior used by Bryde's whales to catch prey, and this behavior may mak...
Article
Full-text available
Despite their enormous size, whales make their living as voracious predators. To catch their much smaller, more maneuverable prey, they have developed several unique locomotor strategies that require high energetic input, high mechanical power output and a surprising degree of agility. To better understand how body size affects maneuverability at t...
Article
Full-text available
Baleen whales influence their ecosystems through immense prey consumption and nutrient recycling1–3. It is difficult to accurately gauge the magnitude of their current or historic ecosystem role without measuring feeding rates and prey consumed. To date, prey consumption of the largest species has been estimated using metabolic models3–9 based on e...
Article
Full-text available
Background Despite exhibiting one of the longest migrations in the world, half of the humpback whale migratory cycle has remained unexamined. Until now, no study has provided a continuous description of humpback whale migratory behavior from a feeding ground to a calving ground. We present new information on satellite-derived offshore migratory mov...
Article
Full-text available
Bio-logging devices equipped with inertial measurement units—particularly accelerometers, magnetometers, and pressure sensors—have revolutionized our ability to study animals as necessary electronics have gotten smaller and more affordable over the last two decades. These animal-attached tags allow for fine scale determination of behavior in the ab...
Article
Full-text available
High efficiency lunate-tail swimming with high-aspect-ratio lifting surfaces has evolved in many vertebrate lineages, from fish to cetaceans. Baleen whales (Mysticeti) are the largest swimming animals that exhibit this locomotor strategy and present an ideal study system to examine how morphology and the kinematics of swimming scale to the largest...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise is a pervasive and increasing source of disturbance to wildlife. Marine mammals exhibit behavioural and physiological responses to naval sonar and other sound sources. The lost foraging opportunities and elevated locomotor effort associated with sonar disturbance likely carry energetic costs, which may lead to population‐level c...
Preprint
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Background: Despite exhibiting one of the longest migrations in the world, half of the humpback whale migratory cycle has remained unexamined; until this point, no study has provided a continuous description of humpback whale migratory behavior from a feeding ground to a breeding ground. We present new information on the satellite derived offshore...
Article
Dogs have been bred for different sizes and functions, which can affect their locomotor biomechanics. As quadrupeds, dogs must distribute their mass between fore and hindlegs when standing. The mass distribution in dogs was studied to determine if the proportion of supported mass on each limb couplet is dependent on body size. A total of 552 dogs f...
Article
Full-text available
The considerable power needed for large whales to leap out of the water may represent the single most expensive burst maneuver found in nature. However, the mechanics and energetic costs associated with the breaching behaviors of large whales remain poorly understood. In this study we deployed whale-borne tags to measure the kinematics of breaching...
Article
Full-text available
It's the prey that matters Although many people think of dinosaurs as being the largest creatures to have lived on Earth, the true largest known animal is still here today—the blue whale. How whales were able to become so large has long been of interest. Goldbogen et al. used field-collected data on feeding and diving events across different types...
Article
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The biology of the blue whale has long fascinated physiologists because of the animal’s extreme size. Despite high energetic demands from a large body, low mass-specific metabolic rates are likely powered by low heart rates. Diving bradycardia should slow blood oxygen depletion and enhance dive time available for foraging at depth. However, blue wh...
Article
Full-text available
The scale-dependence of locomotor factors have long been studied in comparative biomechanics, but remain poorly understood for animals at the upper extremes of body size. Rorqual baleen whales include the largest animals, but we lack basic kinematic data about their movements and behavior below the ocean surface. Here we combined morphometrics from...
Article
Full-text available
The cetacean tail fluke blades are not supported by any vertebral elements. Instead, the majority of the blades are composed of a densely packed collagenous fiber matrix known as the core layer. Fluke blades from six species of odontocete cetaceans were examined to compare the morphology and orientation of fibers at different locations along the sp...
Article
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Motor laterality is the preferential use of structures on one side of the body. Although domestic dogs are commonly used in laterality research, few studies have examined hindlimb motor tasks, and no study, to our knowledge, has examined the effects of body size on measures of laterality. First, we observed 659 dogs during walks at 2 animal shelter...
Article
Full-text available
Motor laterality is the preference shown for using one limb or lateral half of the body over the other. In domestic dogs, most laterality studies have examined forelimb preferences during staged tasks. We focused instead on hindlimb preferences during urination when males use the raised-leg posture and females the squat-raise. We observed individua...
Article
Full-text available
Common eiders (Somateria mollissima) are heavy sea-ducks that spend a large portion of their time swimming at the water surface. Surface swimming generates a bow and hull wave that can constructively interfere and produce wave drag. The speed at which the wavelengths of these waves equal the waterline length of the swimming animal is the hull speed...

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