William H. Blades

William H. Blades
Arizona State University | ASU · Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering

Doctor of Philosophy in Materials Science and Engineering --- Masters in Physics and Applied Physics

About

10
Publications
2,827
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138
Citations
Introduction
Through a synergetic experimental and theoretical approach, I am currently studying the reactivity and corrosion of Nickel-Chromium based alloys. Our goal is to better understand the surface interaction of these alloys with oxygen and various aqueous solvents. I am also examining how oxides interact with graphene and the manner in which defects change its chemical profile and local bonding environment. I study these systems by employing STM, STS, DFT, XPS, AFM, and SEM.
Additional affiliations
June 2016 - May 2020
University of Virginia
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
Quantum confinement in small metal clusters leads to a bunching of states into electronic shells reminiscent of shells in atoms, enabling the classification of clusters as superatoms. The addition of ligands tunes the valence electron count of metal clusters and appears to serve as protecting groups preventing the etching of the metallic cores. Thr...
Article
Full-text available
The atomic structures, bonding characteristics, spin magnetic moments, and stability of VCux(+), VAgx(+), and VAux(+) (x = 3 - 14) clusters have been examined using density functional theory. Our studies indicate that the effective valence of vanadium is size-dependent and at small sizes some of the valence electrons of vanadium are localized on va...
Article
The interaction of oxygen with Ni-Cr(100) alloy surfaces is studied using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and Spectroscopy (STS) to observe the initial steps of oxidation and formation of the alloy-oxide interface. The progression of oxidation was observed for Ni(100) and Ni-Cr(100) thin films including Ni-8wt.%Cr(100) and Ni-12wt.%Cr(100), whi...
Article
Nucleation and growth of metastable oxides on polycrystalline, solid solution Ni-22 wt% Cr alloy was studied in slightly acidic chloride solution and compared to sulfate solutions at the same pH. A combination of AC and DC electrochemical methods, photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy was utilized to characterize the passivation a...
Article
The 2D nature of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) makes their electronic and optical performance highly susceptible to the presence of defects. At elevated temperatures, which can be reached during growth or in operation, additional defects can be introduced and lead to further material degradation. Therefore, by studying the impact of tempe...
Article
The high-temperature oxidation of alloys is most often considered within the continuum framework developed by C. Wagner. We argue that in order to make progress in understanding exclusive scale formation, one needs to examine the atomic-scale kinetic processes that today are amenable to a variety of experimental, computational, and theoretical appr...
Article
Full-text available
To understand the atomistic phenomenon behind initial oxidation processes, we have studied the nanoscale evolution of oxide growth prior to the formation of a complete layer on a Ni–15 wt%Cr(100) alloy surface using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). At the onset of oxidation, a NiO superlattice forms oxide wedges across the step...
Article
Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys owe their superior corrosion resistance to the surface enrichment of passivating Cr-rich oxides or hydroxides and the synergistic effect of Mo in the film 1–3 . However, the specific role of alloying elements such as Mo are not well-understood, especially with respect to their position relative to the oxide/metal interface...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Through a focused computational and experimental effort, the effect of defects and alloy composition on the local binding environment of pristine and defective graphene is being examined. Our goal is to better understand the manner in which various polar solvents and molecular oxygen interact with the graphene-metal interface via changes in its electronic profile. The manner in which molecules intercalate under a graphene-metal interface is not well understood, so by modulating the local chemical environment and considering an array of different molecules we hope to successfully probe this question.
Project
Our specific target is to understand in detail the early-stage oxidation and aqueous corrosion in three selected model systems. We believe that a comprehensive experimental and theoretical attack on the details will enable us to understand what matters, what does not, and lay the basis for a paradigm shift in improvements of corrosion-resistant materials.
Archived project
To understand localized magnetic spin moments of vanadium doped copper, silver, and gold clusters.