William N. S. Arlidge

William N. S. Arlidge
Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries | IGB · Department of Fish Biology, Fisheries and Aquaculture

PhD Zoology
Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow

About

26
Publications
8,602
Reads
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334
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2013 - September 2015
New Zealand Department of Conservation
Position
  • Technical Adviser
June 2005 - January 2012
Victoria University of Wellington
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
January 2016 - March 2020
University of Oxford
Field of study
  • Zoology (Conservation science)

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Efforts to conserve biodiversity comprise a patchwork of international goals, national-level plans, and local interventions that, overall, are failing. We discuss the potential utility of applying the mitigation hierarchy, widely used during economic development activities, to all negative human impacts on biodiversity. Evaluating all biodiversity...
Article
Full-text available
We compare judgments of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) captures elicited from local gillnet skippers and not‐for‐profit conservation organization employees operating in a small‐scale fishery in Peru, to capture rates calculated from a voluntary at‐sea observer program operating out of the same fishery. To reduce cognitive biases and more accurately...
Article
Full-text available
Economic activities in the ocean (that is, the ‘blue economy’) provide value to society, yet also jeopardize marine ecosystems. For example, fisheries are an essential source of income and food security for billions of people, yet bycatch poses a major threat to marine biodiversity, creating trade-offs between economic growth and biodiversity conse...
Article
Rules form an important part of our everyday lives. Here we explore the role of social influence in rule-breaking. In particular, we identify some of the cognitive mechanisms underlying rule-breaking and propose approaches for how they can be scaled up to the level of groups or crowds to better understand the emergence of collective rule-breaking....
Article
Full-text available
The effectiveness of behavioural interventions in conservation often depends on local resource users' underlying social interactions. However, it remains unclear to what extent differences in related topics of information shared between resource users can alter network structure—holding implications for information flows and the spread of behaviour...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biodiversity conservation work can be challenging but rewarding, with potential consequences for conservationists’ mental health. Yet, little is known about patterns of mental health among conservationists and its associated protective and risk factors. A better understanding may help improve working conditions, supporting conservationists’ job sat...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of unprecedented biodiversity loss, the belief that conservation goals can be met could play an important role in ensuring they are fulfilled. We asked conservationists how optimistic they felt about key biodiversity outcomes over the next 10 years; 2341 people familiar with conservation in 144 countries responded. Respondents expressed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Biodiversity conservation work can be challenging but rewarding, with potential consequences for conservationists’ mental health. Yet, little is known about patterns of mental health among conservationists and its associated protective and risk factors. A better understanding can help improve working conditions, supporting conservationists’ job sat...
Article
Goals play important roles in people's lives by focusing attention, mobilizing effort, and sustaining motivation. Understanding conservationists’ satisfaction with goal progress may provide insights into real‐world environmental trends and flag risks to their well‐being and motivation. We asked 2694 conservationists working globally how satisfied t...
Article
Full-text available
Global commitments prioritize protection of wildlife and improvements to human wellbeing. Local disconnects in these commitments are rarely acknowledged—or their implications assessed—preventing the development of effective solutions. National and international efforts to protect marine mammals along South America's west coast have contributed to s...
Article
Full-text available
The new global biodiversity framework (GBF) being developed under the Convention on Biological Diversity must drive action to reverse the ongoing decline of the Earth's biodiversity. Explicit, measurable goals that specify the outcomes we want to achieve are needed to set the course for this action. However, the current draft goals and targets fail...
Article
Full-text available
The upcoming Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) meeting, and adoption of the new Global Biodiversity Framework, represent an opportunity to transform humanity's relationship with nature. Restoring nature while meeting human needs requires a bold vision, including mainstreaming biodiversity conservation in society. We present a framework that...
Preprint
Full-text available
The effectiveness of biodiversity conservation interventions is often dependent on local resource users' underlying social interactions. However, it remains unclear how fine-scale differences in information shared between resource users can influence network structure and the success of behavior-change interventions. Using network null models that...
Preprint
Full-text available
The effectiveness of biodiversity conservation interventions is often dependent on local resource users' underlying social interactions. However, it remains unclear how fine-scale differences in information shared between resource users can influence network structure and the success of behaviour-change interventions. We investigate this knowledge...
Article
Full-text available
It is nearly three decades since the world recognized the need for a global multilateral treaty aiming to address accelerating biodiversity loss. However, biodiversity continues to decline at a concerning rate. Drawing on lessons from the implementation of the current strategic plan of the Convention on Biological Diversity and the 2010 Aichi Targe...
Article
Full-text available
Bycatch poses a significant threat to marine megafauna, such as elasmobranchs. India has one of the highest elasmobranch landings globally, through both targeted catch and bycatch. As elasmobranchs contribute to food and livelihood security, there is a need for holistic approaches to bycatch mitigation. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach to cri...
Preprint
The upcoming meeting of the Convention on Biological Diversity aims to agree a Global Biodiversity Framework, representing an opportunity to transform humanity's relationship with nature. Restoring nature while meeting human needs requires a bold vision, but this will only succeed if biodiversity conservation can be mainstreamed throughout society....
Article
Full-text available
The mitigation hierarchy has been proposed as an overarching framework for managing fisheries and reducing marine megafauna bycatch, but requires empirical application to show its practical utility. Focusing on a small-scale fishing community in Peru as a case study system, we test how the mitigation hierarchy can support efforts to reduce captures...
Thesis
The most widely applied decision-making process for balancing the trade-offs between conservation and development activities is the biodiversity mitigation process, implemented using environmental impact assessment supported by a conceptual ‘mitigation hierarchy’ framework. Yet to date, the exploration of the biodiversity mitigation process to the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Globally, the populations of many marine mammals remain of critical concern after centuries of exploitation and hunting. However, some marine mammal populations (e.g. pinnipeds) have largely recovered from exploitation, and interactions between these species and fisheries - particularly small-scale fisheries - is once again of concern globally. The...
Article
Full-text available
Much research and policy effort is being expended on ways to conserve living nature while enabling the economic and social development needed to increase equity and end poverty. We propose this will only be possible if policy shifts away from conservation targets that focus on avoiding losses towards processes that consider net outcomes for biodive...
Preprint
Full-text available
This document presents the results of an expert knowledge elicitation workshop which identifies policy mechanisms of relevance to the issue of mosquito net fishing across the relevant sectors of public health, fisheries management, development and conservation. A synthesis of current policy and future recommendations is contextualised within the re...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between business and conservation is growing increasingly closer, with the recognition that collaboration can lead to better outcomes for biodiversity. Bennun et al. (2017) introduce the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (the Red List) to inform businesses' mitigation of biodiversity impacts; and subsequently how it can be improv...
Article
Full-text available
In terrestrial and coastal systems, the mitigation hierarchy is widely and increasingly used to guide actions to ensure that no net loss of biodiversity ensues from development. We develop a conceptual model which applies this approach to the mitigation of marine megafauna by-catch in fisheries, going from defining an overarching goal with an assoc...
Article
Coral-associated viruses are a component of the coral holobiont that have received attention only relatively recently. Given the global increase in the prevalence of coral disease, and the lack of positively identified etiological agents for many diseases, these virus consortia require increased investigation. Little is known about the viruses that...
Thesis
Full-text available
Viruses are a ubiquitous component of coral reef ecosystems, with several viral types, from at least seven prokaryotic and 20 eukaryotic virus families currently characterised from the surface mucopolysaccharide layer (SML), coral tissue and the water column. However, little is known about the ecology and function of these viruses. For example, wha...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Explore information diffusion and the transmission of behaviours following interventions for sustaining nature.
Project
The conceptual and empirical application of the mitigation and conservation hierarchy framework.