Will E. Hinckley

Will E. Hinckley
New York University | NYU · Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) Biology

Bachelor of Science

About

4
Publications
384
Reads
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25
Citations
Introduction
I am a PhD student studying transcriptional regulation in plants under the mentorship of Dr. Carol Huang and Dr. Gloria Coruzzi in the NYU GSAS Biology program. I previously conducted research under the mentorship of Dr. Judy Brusslan at CSULB. With funding from NIH RISE, I studied leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. I also interned with Dr. Alison DeLong at Brown University to study how protein phosphatases regulate Arabidopsis plant size.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - December 2019
California State University, Long Beach
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Students enrolled in this and met with me in a classroom setting twice a week to work on class material. I created an interactive learning environment to promote collaborative learning that empowered students to develop life-long study skills.
June 2019 - August 2019
Leadership Alliance Summer Internship at Brown University
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • I interned in Dr. Alison DeLongs Plant Biology lab. I studied the affect that a particular protein phosphatase has on plant growth. I learned how to grow plants in sterile media and expose them to varying doses of pharmacological treatments. I learned how to stain and visualize different cell types under a microscope. I learned how to measure certain plant tissues using ImageJ. I also interrogated online datasets for publicly available gene expression data.
January 2019 - December 2019
California State University, Long Beach
Position
  • Genetics TA
Description
  • I participated in the Biol 495 TA experience for the Genetics lab for the 2019 Fall and Spring semesters.
Education
August 2020 - December 2025
New York University
Field of study
  • Molecular Plant Biology in the GSAS Biology Department
August 2015 - December 2019
California State University, Long Beach
Field of study
  • Cellular/Molecular Biology

Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Full-text available
Nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence nourishes the growing plant. Understanding the regulation of this process is essential for reducing our dependence on nitrogen fertilizers and increasing agricultural sustainability. Our laboratory is interested in chromatin changes that accompany the transition to leaf senescence. Previously, darker g...
Article
Full-text available
In plants, the vegetative to reproductive phase transition (termed bolting in Arabidopsis) generally precedes age-dependent leaf senescence (LS). Many studies describe a temporal link between bolting time and LS, as plants that bolt early, senesce early, and plants that bolt late, senesce late. The molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship...
Preprint
Full-text available
Statement of contributions to field: While it is widely accepted that early bolting generally confers early leaf senescence, the molecular basis of this temporal relationship has not been explored. Arabidopsis shows leaf senescence related gene expression changes in older rosette leaves associated with the transition to bolting at the shoot apical...
Preprint
Full-text available
Nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence nourishes the growing plant. Understanding the regulation of this process is essential for reducing our dependence on nitrogen fertilizers and increasing agricultural sustainability. Our lab is interested in chromatin changes that accompany the transition to leaf senescence. Previously, darker green le...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
In plants, the vegetative to reproductive growth phase transition (bolting) precedes age-dependent leaf senescence (LS). During LS, nitrogen and other macromolecules are recycled from dying leaves and relocated to reproductive organs (fruits/seeds), which in many species are then harvested for human consumption. Many studies describe a temporal link between bolting time and LS, as plants that bolt early, senescence early, and plants that bolt late, senesce late. Understanding the timing of bolting and its molecular connection to LS is agriculturally important, as understanding the molecular causes of coupling may allow for the development of crops that can overcome stress-related early LS caused by early bolting. Homozygous Arabidopsis trithorax (ATX) triple T-DNA insertion mutants (atx1 atx3 atx4) display significantly early bolting coupled to significantly early LS, thus we used this line as a model to study the coupling of these developmental stages. We completed an RNA-seq time-course experiment that revealed 121 genes with differential expression (DEGs) in early bolting atx triple mutants relative to vegetative wildtype plants of the same age. We hypothesize that some of these DEGs, which change expression during bolting, are signaling the onset of LS. If a gene is responsible for coupling, then a plant carrying a null mutant copy of that gene should display an uncoupled phenotype. Twenty genes from this list contain predicted regulatory domains, likely having a role in some type of signaling. To test our hypothesis, T-DNA insertion mutants for 17 of the 20 potential regulatory genes were isolated to screen for mutations that uncouple bolting and LS. Preliminary data from the candidate screen show four mutants that display uncoupled bolting and LS phenotypes. Currently, data support the hypothesis that there are bolting-time specific expression changes of senescence-regulating genes. Further study of the four regulatory gene candidate mutants may elucidate the molecular connection between bolting and age-dependent leaf senescence.