Wesley Malcorps

Wesley Malcorps
University of Stirling · Institute of Aquaculture

Master of Science
Aquaculture🐟 | Aquatic Life🤿 | Sustainability🌏

About

13
Publications
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126
Citations
Introduction
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Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Full-text available
Aquaculture is central in meeting expanding global demands for shrimp consumption. Consequently, increasing feed use is mainly responsible for the overall environmental impact of aquaculture production. Significant amounts of fishmeal are included in shrimp diets, causing dependency on finite marine resources. Driven by economic incentives, terrest...
Article
Full-text available
Efficiency assessments of marine ingredient use in aquaculture are required to fully understand their contribution to global seafood supply and their impacts on all UN Sustainable Development Goals. Fish In: Fish Out (FIFO) ratios have become the principal metric used to ensure aquaculture does not negatively impact wild fish stocks. However, sever...
Article
Full-text available
Sustainability analyses of aquaculture typically ignore the fate and value of processing by-products. The aim of this study was to characterise the nutritional content of the common processing by-products (heads, frames, trimmings, skin, and viscera) of five important finfish species farmed in Europe; Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), European seabass...
Article
Full-text available
Seafood supply chains are complex, not least in the diverse origins of capture fisheries and through aquaculture production being increasingly shared across nations. The business-to-business (B2B) seafood trade is supported by seafood shows that facilitate networking and act as fora for signaling of perceptions and values. In the Global North, sust...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic animals are diverse in terms of species, but also in terms of production, the people involved, and the benefits achieved. In this concept piece, we draw on literature to outline how the diversity of aquatic animals, their production, and their consumption all influence their impact within the food system. Built on evidence from an array of...
Article
Efficiency assessments of marine ingredient use in aquaculture are required to fully understand their con- tribution to global seafood supply and their impacts on all UN Sustainable Development Goals. Fish In: Fish Out (FIFO) ratios have become the principal metric used to ensure aquaculture does not negatively impact wild fish stocks. However, sev...
Data
Seafood supply chains are complex, not least in the diverse origins of capture fisheries and through aquaculture production being increasingly shared across nations. The business-to-business (B2B) seafood trade is supported by seafood shows that facilitate networking and act as fora for signaling of perceptions and values. In the Global North, sust...
Data
Sustainability analyses of aquaculture typically ignore the fate and value of processing by-products. The aim of this study was to characterise the nutritional content of the common processing by-products (heads, frames, trimmings, skin, and viscera) of five important finfish species farmed in Europe; Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), European seabass...
Article
Full-text available
Capture fisheries and aquaculture are important contributors to fulfill the growing global demand for seafood. However, both industries are made up of complex global supply chains and are subjected to social and environmental challenges. Increasing consumer awareness, environmental concerns and food safety requires increasing traceability and trans...
Article
Full-text available
Iran’s geography, size, diversity of water bodies and climate shows great potential for capture fisheries and aquaculture production. Over the past two decades fisheries and aquaculture combined grew about 11.5 percent annually since 2004, reaching a production of approximately 947,000 metric tonnes (MT) in 2014 and over one million MT in 2016. Cap...
Data
We modeled the natural resource demands of a transition to plant-based ingredients in shrimp feed formulations. In this study, feed formulation algorithms were used to create unique feed formulations per shrimp species, with intermediate declining steps of 20% fishmeal substitution by plant ingredients while accounting for the dietary requirements...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Aquaculture is central in meeting expanding global demands for fish and seafood consumption. Consequently, increasing feed use is mainly responsible for the overall environmental impact of aquaculture production. This project provides insight in the resource trade-offs of different aquafeed compositions, driven by aquaculture species, economic and sustainability incentives and trends.
Project
GAIN Green Aquaculture Intensification in Europe (GAIN) is designed to support the ecological intensification of aquaculture in the European Union (EU) and the European Economic Area (EEA), with the dual objectives of increasing production and competitiveness of the industry, while ensuring sustainability and compliance with EU regulations on food safety and environment. Eco-intensification of European aquaculture is a transdisciplinary challenge that requires the integration of scientific and technical innovations, new policies and economic instruments, as well as the mitigation of social constraints. Successful eco-intensification of aquaculture will provide more and better aquatic products, more jobs, and improve trade balance by reducing imports. GAIN, besides looking at innovative ways of integrating cultured species, will seek integration with other sectors, in order to promote the implementation of the principles of circular economy in aquaculture. The GAIN Consortium includes a wide range of complementary expertise and a well-blended mix of research institutes and industrial partners, which will ensure the achievement of the following specific objectives: Develop and optimize sustainable feeds, without increasing the pressure on land and fish stocks; Add value to cultivation, by means of innovative processes, which turn both by-products and side-streams into valuable secondary materials, thus increasing profits and minimizing the environmental footprint; Improve the management of finfish and shellfish farms, in terms of FCR, fish welfare and reduction of wastes, through the use of sensors, biomarkers, Big Data, IoT (Internet of Things) and predictive mathematical models; Support integrated policies and address current barriers to the implementation of the principles of circular economy in aquatic production.