Wendel Walter Raymond

Wendel Walter Raymond
University of Washington Seattle | UW · Friday Harbor Laboratories

Doctor of Philosophy
Nearshore ecology research scientist working on kelp, bivalves, and watersheds

About

16
Publications
5,471
Reads
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244
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
231 Citations
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Introduction
I am broadly interesting in the biological and physical drivers that affect marine communities, food webs, and their interactions. I strive to combine multiple techniques and data sources including observational, experimental, biomarkers, data mining etc. to address such research questions. While my PhD research largely focused on eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems my interests span all marine ecosystems and species. See more at www.wendelraymond.com
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - May 2019
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • Adjunct Instrcutor
Description
  • Instructor for FISH 414: Field Methods in Marine Ecology and Fisheries (3crd) during "Maymester". Class focused on application of various field methods involved in nearshore ecology and fisheries.
May 2015 - May 2015
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • TA for FISH 414-Field Methods in Marine Ecology and Fisheries (3crd) during "Maymester". Class focused on application of various field methods involved in nearshore ecology and fisheries. Taught by Dr. G. Eckert.
July 2014 - August 2020
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
August 2014 - August 2020
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Field of study
  • Fisheries
August 2008 - June 2012
Oregon State University
Field of study
  • Biology, Marine Biology, Chemistry

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
The presence and strength of trophic cascades can be a function of the local abiotic environment and relative abundance of key species. The reintroduction and expansion of sea otters Enhydra lutris, a known keystone species in kelp ecosystems, in southeast Alaska provides a rare natural experiment to test the generality of a apex-predator-seagrass...
Article
Full-text available
To better understand the spatial context of population dynamics of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in Southeast Alaska (SEAK), we investigated the spatial and temporal patterns of subsistence sea otter harvest and assessed the effect of harvest on population growth. U.S. federal law permits subsistence harvest of sea otters and sale of clothing and han...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research in southeast Alaska on the effects of sea otters Enhydra lutris in seagrass Zostera marina communities identified many but not all of the trophic relationships that were predicted by a sea otter-mediated trophic cascade. To further resolve these trophic connections, we compared biomass, carbon (δ ¹³ C) and nitrogen (δ ¹⁵ N) stable...
Article
Full-text available
The global distribution of primary production and consumption by humans (fisheries) is well-documented, but we have no map linking the central ecological process of consumption within food webs to temperature and other ecological drivers. Using standardized assays that span 105° of latitude on four continents, we show that rates of bait consumption...
Article
Full-text available
There is increasing urgency to implement climate change mitigation strategies that enhance greenhouse gas removal from the atmosphere and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Recently, coastal “blue carbon” habitats⁠—mangroves, salt marshes, and seagrass meadows—have received attention for their ability to capture CO2 and store organic carbon (OC...
Article
Full-text available
Sea otter populations in Southeast Alaska, USA, have increased dramatically from just over 400 translocated animals in the late 1960s to >8,000 by 2003. The recovery of sea otters to ecosystems from which they had been absent has affected coastal food webs, including commercially important fisheries, and thus information on expected growth and equi...
Article
Full-text available
The complex coastline that stretches from Southeast Alaska to the Salish Sea hosts an expansive and verdant bathtub ring of seagrasses. Their presence is facilitated by the geographic complexity of the region, which promotes a variety of suitable substrates that are appropriate for seagrass recruitment (mud to sands to rock within small spatial sca...
Article
Full-text available
Kelps in temperate marine ecosystems produce substantial detrital biomass that provides a carbon subsidy to consumers in neighboring habitats. After detachment, detrital kelp degrades and potentially changes in nutritional quality. Red sea urchins, Mesocentrotus franciscanus, are an abundant consumer of drift algae from the shallow subtidal to >100...
Article
Full-text available
The invasive Pacific red lionfish (Pterois volitans) poses a threat to western Atlantic and Carib-bean coral reef systems. Lionfish are small-bodied pred-ators that can reduce the abundance and diversity of native fishes via predation. Additionally, native preda-tors or competitors appear to have a negligible effect on similarly sized lionfish. Nas...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Kelp dominated ecosystems are found throughout cold-water coastal environments. Sea urchins are a common character in these ecosystems and play important roles in structuring benthic communities. This work focuses on drift algae and sea urchins, including: drift algae availability and dynamics, drift-mediated urchin behavior, trophic relationships of urchins and surrounding benthic communities.
Project
Investigate and identify trophic linkages in eelgrass ecosystems in Southeast Alaska. This project will study the interplay among eelgrass, sea otters, grazers, fishes, and carbon.
Project
Scientists are studying the harvest of sea otters in Southeast Alaska through an analysis of US Fish and Wildlife Service harvest data and collection of local and traditional ecological knowledge. This interdisciplinary project brings together ecology and anthropology experts to identify pathways and outcomes for sea otter management, including co-management by tribal groups. Researchers will investigate how sea otter harvests have changed in space and time, how they affect the sea otter population, and other details. Recent increases in the number of sea otters harvested and underlying factors contributing to those increases will be investigated. Local communities, Alaska Native groups, fishermen’s groups, and government agencies are concerned about the growing sea otter population and their impact on resources to coastal communities, including important shellfish species for commercial, sport, and subsistence harvest. This project addresses impacts by sea otters on coastal ecosystems in Southeast Alaska and will inform residents and stakeholders from coastal communities about strategies for adapting to this change.