Wen Bo Liao

Wen Bo Liao
China West Normal University · College of Life Science

PhD degree

About

139
Publications
39,469
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2,622
Citations
Citations since 2016
79 Research Items
2032 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
Introduction
Wen Bo Liao currently works at the College of Life Science, China West Normal University. Wen Bo does research in Biology, Ecology and Zoology. Their current project is 'EVolution of brain size within anurans'.
Additional affiliations
July 2009 - present
China West Normal University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
Description
  • I am interested in studying evolutionary ecology of frogs in Hengduan Mountians in China. I have published some papers in Oecologia, BMC Evolutionary Biology, Evolutionary Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Frontiers in Zoology and Jounral of Zoology London.

Publications

Publications (139)
Article
Full-text available
Reproductive investments influenced by environmental conditions vary extensively among geographically distinct populations. However, investigations of patterns of intraspecific variation in male reproductive investments and the mechanisms shaping this variation in anurans remain scarce. Here, we focused on the variation in testis size in 14 populat...
Article
Full-text available
While crypsis is a prominent antipredator adaptation, the role of the brain in predator-driven evolution remains controversial. Resolving this controversy requires contextualizing the brain with established antipredator traits and predation pressure. We hypothesize that the reduced predation risk through crypsis relaxes predation-driven selection o...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual dimorphism is regarded as the consequence of differential responses by males and females to selection pressures. Limb muscle play a very important role during amplexus, which is likely to be under both natural and sexual selection in anurans. Here, we studied the effects of natural and sexual selection on limb muscle mass in males and female...
Article
Full-text available
Eye position varies significantly among taxonomic levels, and this variation is often shaped by ecological and behavioral factors. Eye position is often positively associated with interorbital distance where species with broad visual fields possess a large distance between the left and right eye. Selective pressures underlying the evolution of the...
Article
Full-text available
Significance To adapt to arboreal lifestyles, treefrogs have evolved a suite of complex traits that support vertical movement and gliding, thus presenting a unique case for studying the genetic basis for traits causally linked to vertical niche expansion. Here, based on two de novo-assembled Asian treefrog genomes, we determined that genes involved...
Article
Full-text available
Extra‐pair paternity (EPP) benefits to improve the reproductive success via extra‐pair fertilizations without the costs of parental care in males and through improved offspring quality with additional food and parental care in females among species of birds. Variations in the EPP appear to link to behavioral and ecological factors and sexual select...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Amphibians require both terrestrial and aquatic environments to complete their life cycles. Thus, they are subject to complex selection pressures stemming from different environments, and these selection pressures are likely to vary geographically with variation in temperature and precipitation. Studies of genetic differentiation along geograph...
Article
Full-text available
Eye size varies markedly among taxonomic levels, and this variation is often related to the patterns shaped by phylogeny and ecological and behavioral factors. The selective pressures underlying eye size evolution are especially studied in fishes, anurans, birds, and mammals. However, selective pressures underlying the eye size evolution in anurans...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in age structure and body size benefits are identified to understand the evolution of life history. Here, we estimated the age structure and body size of two species of odorous frogs (Odorrana margaretae and Odorrana grahami) by using skeletochronology. The ages at sexual maturity of O. grahami and O. margaretae in both sexes were 1an...
Article
Full-text available
Genome size changes significantly among taxonomic levels, and this variation is often related to the patterns shaped by the phylogeny, life histories and ecological factors. However, there are mixed evidences on the main factors affecting molecular evolution in animals. In this study, we used phylogenetic comparative analysis to investigate the evo...
Article
Full-text available
Social group is associated with life-history traits and can predict brain size variation in cooperative primates and some other mammal groups, but such explicit relationships remain enigmatic in cooperatively breeding birds. Indeed, some compositions of social group in cooperative species (e.g., helper number and group size) would affect the fitnes...
Article
Full-text available
Brain size exhibits significant changes within and between species. Evolution of large brains can be explained by the need to improve cognitive ability for processing more information in changing environments. However, brains are among the most energetically expensive organs. Enlarged brains can impose energetic demands that limit brain size evolut...
Article
Full-text available
Organisms adapt to environmental fluctuations by varying their morphology and structural, physiological, and biochemical characteristics. Gut microbiome, varying rapidly in response to environmental shifts, has been proposed as a strategy for adapting to the fluctuating environment (e.g., new dietary niches). Here, we explored the adaptive mechanis...
Article
We present a high‐quality genome assembly for the Asiatic toad (Bufo gargarizans) and explore the evolution of several large gene families in amphibians. With a large genome assembly size of 4.55 Gb, the chromosome‐scale assembly includes 747 scaffolds with an N50 of 539.8 Mb and 1.79% gaps. Long terminal repeats (LTRs) constitute a high proportion...
Article
Full-text available
Species in transformed habitats, frequently labeled as environmental generalists, tend to show broader niches than species in natural habitats. However, how population niche expansion translates into changes in the niches of individual organisms remains unclear, particularly in the context of habitat transformation. Niche expansion could be a produ...
Article
Full-text available
The compensation hypothesis predicts that if the left testis is defective e.g. due to developmental stress, the increased right testis serves a compensatory role, and thereby displaying testes asymmetry which can be a reliable indicator of male body condition. Here, to test the prediction of the compensation hypothesis, we analyzed difference in si...
Article
Full-text available
Species can evolve diverse strategies to survive periods of uncertainty. Animals may either invest in energy storage, allowing them to decrease foraging costs, such as locomotion or risk of predation, or they may invest in better cognitive abilities helping them to flexibly adapt their behaviour to meet novel challenges. Here we test this idea of a...
Article
Competition over mates is a powerful force shaping trait evolution. For instance, better cognitive abilities may be beneficial in male-male competition and thus be selected for by intrasexual selection. Alternatively, investment in physical attributes favoring male performance in competition for mates may lower the resources available for brain dev...
Article
Full-text available
Sperm competition is often considered the primary selective force underlying the rapid and diversifying evolution of ejaculate traits. Yet, several recent studies have drawn attention to other forms of selection with the potential of exceeding the effects of sperm competition. Since ejaculates are complex, multivariate traits, it seems plausible th...
Article
Genome size markedly displays variation across taxa. Genome size variation is affected by two principally different mechanisms (such as whole‐genome duplication events (polyploidization) and accumulation of noncoding elements). In addition, genome size variation is also affected by the phylogenetic signal, life‐history traits and environmental fact...
Article
Full-text available
Changes of environmental conditions can shape organs size evolution in animal kingdoms. In particular, environmental changes lead to difference in food resources between different habitats, thereby affecting individual’s energy intake and allocation. The digestive theory states that animals consuming food with low contents of digestible material...
Article
Full-text available
Variation in organ structure likely provides important clues on local adaptation and reflects the pressure target of nature selection. As one of the important organs, the skin plays a key role in adapting to complex environments by reducing water loss or increasing water absorption. Nevertheless, variation in the skin structure across different pop...
Article
Full-text available
The understanding of the intrinsic and extrinsic causes of longevity variation has deservedly received much attention in evolutionary ecologist. Here we tested the association between longevity and spawning-site groups across 38 species of Chinese anurans. As indicators of group-spawning we used spawning-site group size and spawning-site density, w...
Article
Full-text available
Vertebrate eye size typically scales hypoallemetrically with body size—as animals grow larger their eyes get relatively smaller. Additionally, eye size is highly variable across species, and such variability often reflects functional adaptations to differences in behavior and/or ecology. The selective pressures underlying the evolution of eye size...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic flexibility of morphological and physiological traits within species is a common phenomenon across animal taxa. Hesse's rule predicts that the size of an organ should exhibit an increase with increasing altitude along environmental gradients due to changes in oxygen supply and energy demands. Here, we test the prediction of Hesse's rule...
Article
Full-text available
Selection pressure is an important force in shaping the evolution of vertebrate brain size among populations within species and between species. The evolution of brain size is tightly linked to natural and sexual selection, and life-history traits. In particular, increased environmental stress, intensity of sexual selection, and slower life history...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual selection theory states that the premating (ornaments and armaments) sexual traits should trade off with the postmating (testes and ejaculates) sexual traits, assuming that growing and maintaining these traits is expensive and that total reproductive investments are limited. Male-male competition and sperm competition are predicted to affect...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental variation can promote differentiation in life-history traits in species of anurans. Increased environmental stress usually results in larger age at sexual maturity, older mean age, longer longevity, slower growth, larger body size, and a shift in reproductive allocation from offspring quantity to quality, and a stronger trade-off betw...
Article
Full-text available
Hibernation is an effective energy conservation strategy that has been widely adopted by animals to cope with unpredictable environmental conditions. The liver, in particular, plays an important role in adaptive metabolic adjustment during hibernation. Mammalian studies have revealed that many genes involved in metabolism are differentially express...
Article
Full-text available
The gut microbiota is integral to an organism's digestive structure and has been shown to play an important role in producing substrates for gluconeogenesis and energy production, vasodilator, and gut motility. Numerous studies have demonstrated that variation in diet types is associated with the abundance and diversity of the gut microbiota, a rel...
Article
Full-text available
The 'cognitive buffer' hypothesis predicts that the costs of relatively large brains are compensated for later in life by the increased benefits of large brains providing a higher chance of survival under changing environments through flexible behaviors in the animal kingdom. Thus, animals that live in a larger range (with a higher probability of e...
Article
Because the brain is one of the energetically most expensive organs of animals, trade-offs have been hypothesized to exert constraints on brain size evolution. The expensive-tissue hypothesis predicts that the cost of a large brain should be compensated by decreasing size of other metabolically costly tissues, such as the gut. Here, we analyzed the...
Article
Full-text available
Bergmann's rule states that within a species of endotherms smaller individuals are found in warmer conditions, which is consistent for nearly all endotherms, while in ectotherms body size patterns are less consistent. As ectothermic vertebrates, the morphology of amphibians is likely impacted by climatic conditions. Here, we examined latitudinal va...
Article
Full-text available
Brain sizes vary substantially across vertebrate taxa yet the evolution of brain size appears tightly linked to the evolution of life histories. For example, larger‐brained species generally live longer than smaller‐brained species. A larger brain requires more time to grow and develop at a cost of exceeded gestation period and delayed weaning age....
Article
Full-text available
The competition for fertilization among sperms from different males can drive variation in male reproductive investments. However, the mechanisms shaping reproductive allocation resulting from the effect of variation in reproductive investments relative to environmental variables on resource availability and male-male competition in frogs remains p...
Article
Full-text available
While much research has focused on the rapid divergent evolution of genital shape across animals, the evolutionary factors driving this variation require investigation. Orbach et al. (2017b) used 2-D geometric morphometric analyses to study the effects of ontogeny, allometry, phylogeny, sexual selection, and natural selection on the diversity of va...
Article
Full-text available
The challenges of seasonal environments are thought to contribute to brain evolution, but in which way is debated. According to the Cognitive Buffer Hypothesis (CBH) brain size should increase with seasonality, as the cognitive benefits of a larger brain should help overcoming periods of food scarcity via, for instance, increased behavioral flexibi...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of sperm quality and quantity is shaped by various selective processes, with sperm competition generally considered the primary selective agent. Particularly in external fertilizers, however, sperm limitation through gamete dispersal can also influence gamete investments, but empirical data examining this effect are limited. Here, we...
Article
Full-text available
Body size variation across environmental gradients has received considerable attention in evolutionary ecology in recent years. In this study, we investigated body sizes and age structure using skeletochronology in male Polypedates megacephalus from five sites with the attitude ranging from 449 to 1300 m. The results showed age at sexual maturity i...
Article
Full-text available
Brain size varies dramatically between vertebrate species. Two prominent adaptive hypotheses – the Cognitive Buffer Hypothesis (CBH) and the Expensive Brain Hypothesis (EBH) – have been proposed to explain brain size evolution. The CBH assumes that brain size should increase with seasonality, as the cognitive benefits of a larger brain should help...
Article
Full-text available
The compensation hypothesis predicts that one testis may grow more for compensating for a reduced function in the other testis, thus exhibiting a directional asymmetry in testis size. In this study, we tested the prediction of the compensation hypothesis in the Chinese endemic Tree Frog Hyla gongshanensis jingdongensis in a population in Kegong Res...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual selection theory predicts a trade-off between premating (ornaments and armaments) and postmating (testes and ejaculates) sexual traits, assuming that growing and maintaining these traits is costly and that total reproductive investments are limited. The number of males in competition, the reproductive gains from investing in premating sexual...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic flexibility of morphological characters is widespread in the animal kingdom. In the present paper, we investigated altitudinal variation in organ size (heart, lungs, livers, kidneys and digestive tract) in the spot-legged treefrog (Polypedates megacephalus) across three populations along an altitudinal gradient in southwestern China. Bot...
Article
Muscles are vital for the process of movement, mating and escape of predators in amphibians. During evolution, the morphological and genetic characteristics as well as the size of muscles in species will change to adapt different environments. Theory predicts that low male-male competition in high-altitude/latitude selects for small limb muscles. H...