Weida Gong

Weida Gong
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of Marine Sciences

About

6
Publications
990
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162
Citations
Introduction
Weida Gong currently works at the Department of Marine Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Weida does research in Oceanography, Microbiology and Marine Biology.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
To assess the comparability between taxonomic identification methods for phytoplankton, multiple approaches were used to characterize phytoplankton community composition within the Neuse River Estuary (NRE), North Carolina. Small subunit 18S rRNA gene (18S) sequencing and accessory pigment analysis displayed similar trends, indicating chlorophytes...
Article
Full-text available
The polar diatom Fragilariopsis kerguelensis is ubiquitous in Southern Ocean waters and is a major responder to iron fertilization, encountering large gradients in iron concentrations and light availability. We performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of F. kerguelensis grown under varying iron and light conditions in order to investigate th...
Article
Full-text available
The small subunit 18S rRNA (18S) gene is the most commonly used marker for taxonomic identification in eukaryotes. However, protists may harbor substantial variation in their 18S gene copy number, which can lead to a rapid decline in concordance between 18S gene sequences and actual organismal abundances. Here we used a computational method to esti...
Article
Diatoms are a highly successful group of photosynthetic protists that often thrive under adverse environmental conditions. Members of the genus Pseudo‐nitzschia are ecologically important diatoms which are able to subsist during long periods of chronic iron limitation and form dense blooms following iron fertilization events. The cellular strategie...
Article
In coastal waters worldwide, an increase in frequency and intensity of algal blooms has been attributed to eutrophication, with further increases predicted because of climate change. Yet, the cellular-level changes that occur in blooming algae remain largely unknown. Comparative metatranscriptomics was used to investigate the underlying molecular m...

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