Wei-Fen Chen

Wei-Fen Chen
University of Leicester | LE · School of Business

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
1,744
Reads
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26
Citations
Citations since 2016
10 Research Items
24 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
Introduction
My research focuses on the consumer behavior of individuals experiencing broadly-defined social mobility, as well as its impact on personal well-being and on a sustainable consumption-scape in global cities. I tend to take a broad range of methods to characterize consumers who are “on the move” either in social stratification or in transnational relocation.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
This study examines the shopping preferences of “new poor” consumers who have incongruent capital: lower economic capital and higher noneconomic capital. The new poor exemplify consumers with ambiguous and fragmented identity; thus, they do not fit marketers’ static categorization of consumer segments. In the marketplace, these consumers must compr...
Article
Purpose This study aims to explore the consumption practices of globally-mobile, young consumers from China who experience both upward social mobility and geographically outbound mobility by studying abroad, echoing emerging scholarship of “moving consumption”. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 27 f...
Article
The present research explored whether and how consumers with high levels of perceived social mobility (PSM) would endorse materialism, an under-researched effect that is not contingent on either their current socioeconomic status (SES) or anticipated social mobility trajectories. Four mixed-methods studies, comprising two large-scale surveys and tw...
Chapter
This chapter examines the emergence of urban contention against inbound tourist shoppers in the Chinese global city of Hong Kong. Drawing on netnography of citizens’ digitally enabled activities and qualitative analysis of news coverage, this chapter discusses how the local residents self-mobilised on the internet and engaged in a series of content...
Article
New middle class tourists, especially those consumption-driven, urban dwellers from emerging economies, have acquired a taste for shopping tourism and quickly become the majority of the inbound visitors who bring business niches to the post-industrial, host societies. In this trend, scant scholarly attention has been paid to the corresponding react...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore some specific, current social phenomena in China that may influence consumers’ ethical beliefs and practices, focusing on how some top-down, social and political changes could shape consumer behavior that needs to be understood in the Chinese context. Design/methodology/approach Extensive literatur...
Conference Paper
This article maintains that new middle class tourists (especially those consumption-driven, urban dwellers from emerging economies) have acquired a taste for shopping tourism and quickly become the majority of the inbound visitors who bring business niches to the post-industrial, host societies. It is argued that under this trend, scant scholarly a...
Conference Paper
This study explores the transitional identity of the youngsters who experience dual mobility—the horizontal mobility (geographic relocation) and the potential, upward mobility—in the process of pursuing higher education overseas. While individuals’ identity dynamics have been examined in multiple mobility forms such as migration, nomadism, and shor...
Conference Paper
The macro-societal changes such as the economic recession in recent years are moving many people in the younger generation from the middle class to the working poor or the new poor class, which echoes the worldwide scholarly discussions of the “dwindling middle class” or the “M-shaped society.” Taking a consumer culture theory (CCT) approach, this...
Article
This performance-based autoethnographic work is inspired by the epiphanic moment in the author's life. By depicting a woman struggling between families' expectations to her and her own dream, the author demonstrates the complicated nature of the structure-agency interaction and sympathizes with those obedient daughters who inherit the family tradit...

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