Wei-Chun Wang

Wei-Chun Wang
Stars Behavioral Health Group

PhD

About

25
Publications
11,952
Reads
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998
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
659 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
October 2013 - present
Duke University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2008 - September 2013
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2006 - June 2008
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 2008 - September 2013
University of California, Davis
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
August 2004 - May 2008

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Considerable neuropsychological and neuroimaging work indicates that the medial temporal lobes are critical for both item and relational memory retrieval. However, there remain outstanding issues in the literature, namely the extent to which medial temporal lobe regions are differentially recruited during incidental and intentional retrieval of ite...
Article
The "illusory truth" effect refers to the phenomenon whereby repetition of a statement increases its likelihood of being judged true. This phenomenon has important implications for how we come to believe oft-repeated information that may be misleading or unknown. Behavioral evidence indicates that fluency or the subjective ease experienced while pr...
Article
It is generally assumed that the encoding of a single event generates multiple memory representations, which contribute differently to subsequent episodic memory. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and representational similarity analysis to examine how visual and semantic representations predicted subsequent memory for single ite...
Preprint
It is generally assumed that the encoding of a single event generates multiple memory representations, which contribute differently to subsequent episodic memory. We used fMRI and representational similarity analysis (RSA) to examine how visual and semantic representations predicted subsequent memory for single item encoding (e.g., seeing an orange...
Article
The declarative memory system allows us to accurately recognize a countless number of items and events, particularly those strengthened by repeated exposure. However, increased familiarity due to repetition can also lead to false recognition of related but new items, particularly when mechanisms supporting fine-grain mnemonic discrimination fail. T...
Article
Bastin and colleagues present an integrative model of how recollection- and familiarity-based memories are represented in the brain. While they emphasize the role of attribution mechanisms in shaping memory retrieval, prior work examining implicit memory suggests that memory deficits may be better understood by separating attributional biases from...
Article
Full-text available
Depending on a person's goals, different aspects of stored knowledge are accessed. Decades of behavioral work document the flexible use of knowledge, but little neuroimaging work speaks to these questions. We used representational similarity analysis to investigate whether the relationship between brain activity and semantic structure of statements...
Article
Full-text available
Brain stimulation technologies have seen increasing application in basic science investigations, specifically toward the goal of improving memory function. However, proposals concerning the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive enhancement often rely on simplified notions of excitation. As a result, most applications examining the effects of trans...
Preprint
Brain stimulation technologies have seen increasing application in basic science investigations, specifically towards the goal of improving memory functioning. However, proposals concerning the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive enhancement often rely on simplified notions of excitation and, most applications examining the effects of transcrani...
Chapter
Full-text available
One of the cognitive functions most affected by the aging process is our memory for personally experienced past events or episodic memory (EM). The advent of functional neuroimaging has greatly advanced our knowledge of the neural basis of EM and its decline with age. The current chapter reviews prominent hypotheses of EM decline in healthy aging a...
Chapter
Full-text available
Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The fifth edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions in the study of the biological underpinnings of complex cognition -- the relationship between the structural and physiological mechanisms of the ner...
Article
A prominent finding in recognition memory is that studied items are associated with more variability in memory strength than new items. Here, we test 3 competing theories for why this occurs-the encoding variability, attention failure, and recollection accounts. Distinguishing among these theories is critical because each provides a fundamentally d...
Article
Abstract Voss, Lucas, and Paller point out that explicit recognition tests can be supported by implicit processes, and that conceptual implicit memory may be reflected in ERP correlates of familiarity-based recognition. Here, we argue that an examination of individual differences indicates that familiarity is coupled with conceptual implicit memory...
Article
Explicit memory is thought to be distinct from implicit memory. However, growing evidence has indicated that explicit familiarity-based recognition memory judgments rely on the same process that supports conceptual implicit memory. We tested this hypothesis by examining individual differences using a paradigm wherein we measured both familiarity an...
Article
The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is generally thought to be critical for explicit, but not implicit, memory. Here, we demonstrate that the perirhinal cortex (PRc), within the MTL, plays a role in conceptually-driven implicit memory. Amnesic patients with MTL lesions that converged on the left PRc exhibited deficits on two conceptual implicit tasks (i...
Article
It is well accepted that recognition memory reflects the contribution of two separable memory retrieval processes, namely recollection and familiarity. However, fundamental questions remain regarding the functional nature and neural substrates of these processes. In this article, we describe a simple quantitative model of recognition memory (i.e.,...
Article
Older adults typically perform worse than younger adults on tasks of associative, relative to item, memory. One account of this deficit is that older adults have fewer attentional resources to encode associative information. Previous researchers investigating this issue have divided attention at encoding and then have examined whether associative a...

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