Watcharapong Hongjamrassilp

Watcharapong Hongjamrassilp
Chulalongkorn University · Department of Marine Science

Ph.D. in Biology

About

8
Publications
2,407
Reads
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47
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - May 2021
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • EEB187 Field Behavioral Ecology & Conservation Biology; EEB140 Biology of Marine Mammals; EEB109 Introduction to Marine Science; EEB109L Introduction to Marine Science Laboratory; EEB142 Aquatic Communities; PSYCH118 Comparative Psychobiology/ Animal behavior; EEB115 Mammology; EEB129 Animal Behavior
January 2017 - April 2017
University of California, San Diego
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • SIO188 Biology of Fishes
September 2014 - August 2016
University of California, San Diego
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Heterochrony and evolution of an aggressive behavior in the Sarcastic Fringehead (Neoclinus blanchardi)
Education
September 2017 - August 2021
University of California, Los Angeles
Field of study
  • Animal Behavior, Behavioral Ecology, Ecotourism

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
An increase in ecotourism adversely impacts many animals and contributes to biodiversity loss. To mitigate these impacts, we illustrate the application of a conservation behavior framework towards the development of a sustainable ecotourism management plan. In Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand, thousands of tourists annually come to see a unique mass migr...
Article
Full-text available
Interest in wildlife ecotourism is increasing but many studies have identified detrimental effects making it unsustainable in the long run. We discuss a relatively new wildlife ecotourism event where tourists visit Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand to witness a mass migration of freshwater shrimp that emerge from the water and move across land known as “s...
Article
An understanding of the mechanisms and functions of animal migratory behaviour may provide insights into its evolution. Furthermore, knowledge about migration may be important for conservation of rare species and may help to manage species in a rapidly changing world. Upstream migration is common in riverine animals, but little is known about proxi...
Article
Full-text available
Several temperate marine taxa of the northern hemisphere follow a trans-Pacific biogeographic track with representatives on either side of the intervening boreal waters. Shelter-dwelling blenniiform fishes of the genus Neoclinus exhibit this trans-Pacific distribution pattern with three species in the eastern North Pacific and eight species in the...
Article
The Sarcastic Fringehead (Neoclinus blanchardi, Teleostei) exhibits an extreme version of a common aggressive display, the “gaping display,” in which an open mouth is presented toward an opponent. Males of this species have extremely long jaws that extend posteriorly well past the posterior margin of the head and are flared laterally during the gap...
Article
Statement of significance: Batoid fishes have very light cartilaginous skeletons that facilitate their elegant swimming by applying their enlarged wing-like pectoral fins. Previous studies have shown structural features and mechanical properties of the mineralized cartilage skeleton in various batoid fishes. However, the details of the pectoral fi...
Article
Full-text available
The biological study of wild non-Apis bees can provide useful information that may help with the pollination of food crops and native plants in areas where the keeping of honey bee colonies is restricted or affected by CCD. Here, we describe the nesting biology of the Oriental large carpenter bee, Xylocopa (Biluna) nasalis Westwood, 1838. An aggreg...

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