Wanda Zinger

Wanda Zinger
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle · Homme et Environnement

About

6
Publications
817
Reads
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37
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - October 2020
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2017 - October 2020
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
The archipelago of Vanuatu has been at the crossroads of human population movements in the Pacific for the past three millennia. To help address several open questions regarding the history of these movements, we generated genome-wide data for 11 ancient individuals from the island of Efate dating from its earliest settlement to the recent past, in...
Article
South Vanuatu was an important hub of settlement and interaction in the tropical southwestern Pacific. A recent field project, the South Vanuatu Archaeological Survey, has begun carrying out field research, focusing initially on the islands of Futuna, Aniwa, and Tanna. This work builds upon pioneering research carried out in the 1960s, which in the...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
My ongoing southern Vanuatu research is supported by a major grant from the Australian Research Council (DP160103578), with my colleagues Dr. Stuart Bedford (ANU) and Dr. Frédérique Valentin (CNRS). This project will expand on recent collaborative research involving Pacific Islander communities to explore '3000 years of settlement and interaction in southern Vanuatu': 'One of archaeology's most significant contributions is providing models for the emergence of cultural diversity through time. Vanuatu is one of the most diverse regions on Earth. The southern islands were an important hub in early settlement and long-term inter-island interactions of Island Melanesia. Yet little is known about the origins of cultural contacts and diversity in the area. A major archaeological survey of the Polynesian outliers Futuna and Aniwa and neighbouring islands Tanna and Aneityum would greatly improve our knowledge of settlement patterns, long-distance exchange, and cross-cultural interaction in the region, from initial Lapita settlement 3000 years ago through to the arrival of Christian missionaries in the 1860s.'