Walton O Schalick

Walton O Schalick
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation

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31
Publications
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107
Citations

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Background Federal exception from informed consent (EFIC) procedures allow studies to enroll patients with time-sensitive, life-threatening conditions when written consent is not feasible. Our objective was to compare enrollment rates with and without EFIC in a trial of tranexamic acid (TXA) for children with hemorrhagic injuries. Methods We condu...
Article
Full-text available
Background Trauma is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children in the United States. The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid (TXA) improves survival in adults with traumatic hemorrhage, however, the drug has not been evaluated in a clinical trial in severely injured children. We designed the Traumatic Injury Clinical Trial Evaluati...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The antifibrinolytic drug tranexamic acid (TXA) improves survival in adults with traumatic hemorrhage; however, the drug has not been evaluated in a trial in injured children. We evaluated the feasibility of a large-scale trial evaluating the effects of TXA in children with severe hemorrhagic injuries. Methods: Severely injured child...
Article
Objective: Children with minor head trauma frequently present to emergency departments (EDs). Identifying those with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be difficult, and it is unknown whether clinical prediction rules outperform clinician suspicion. Our primary objective was to compare the test characteristics of the Pediatric Emergency Care Appl...
Article
Governmental agencies serve individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and Psychiatric Disabilities (PD) and must consequently communicate with these individuals at multiple points, from interviews with claims representatives to written notices sent to applicants and beneficiaries about highly complex material. We review the social scientific,...
Article
America in the 1930s was Dickensian. Ushered in with the Great Depression and shepherded out with the ravening maw of global war, the 1930s was a time of great fear. Yet the 1939 New York World's Fair heralded the hope of social and technological innovations, which would help transform postwar America. The 1930s were the best of times, they were th...
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Medicine and neurology in the Middle Ages were different from what they are today. Traditionally, medicine in the Middle Ages has been described as intellectually stagnant and practically chaotic. This chapter presents a summary of the development of medicine as it relates to neurological conditions from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissa...
Article
Full-text available
Pediatric Rehabilitation is starting a new section in the journal. 'Voices from the Past' will combine two forms of articles. The first will be reviews of, and where possible, republication of the 'classic' articles in the field of paediatric rehabilitation. Summaries and discussions of these seminal contributions will at least be presented. The se...
Article
According to legend, Canute the Great, the 11th century king of England, Norway, and Denmark, ordered his throne brought to the seashore at low tide. Ruler of an extensive realm, he commanded the incoming tide not wet the hem of his gown. The tide paid no attention. The moistened Canute reputedly chastened his followers, how empty is the authority...
Article
A sage observed that a true scholar is someone who if placed on a desert island devoid of books or other scholarly materials could still advance our understanding of the world. Jerome Joseph Bylebyl was just such a scholar, whose mind could thrive in a material vacuum. The son of Laura and Dr. Harry J. Bylebyl, Jerry grew up in western New York (no...
Article
Marc-Hector Landouzy (1812-1864) was one of the first to describe facial paralysis in newborn, through a series of case studies. By examining these four cases in the context of Landouzy's life, publications and professional circumstances, this study shows how case studies were an important part of the scientific revolution within medicine in the 19...
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An educational program was developed incorporating people with disabilities (PWDs) as "consumer-trainers" who educate physical medicine and rehabilitation residents about challenges in everyday living and their solutions to these. During the residency postgraduate years 2 and 4, pairs of residents visited trainers in their homes and at their jobs t...
Article
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The introduction is the most thorough and thoughtful survey of the textual category; previous work is appropriately described as "d'una manera fragmentària" (p. 17). Gil-Sotres, with input from Paniagua and García-Ballester, elucidates the classical and Arabic roots of the Regimen as we...
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Bulletin of the History of Medicine 73.4 (1999) 694-696 Those who work with sick children have often wished for miracles; some have seen them. Rescue of the Innocents is a history based on such events, from the Middle Ages. The work is part of the burgeoning field of studies on medieval childhood, germinated by the expansive seed of Philippe Ariès'...
Article
In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Bulletin of the History of Medicine 73.1 (1999) 145-146 Book Review Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Copies of the "Ars Medicine": A Checklist and Contents Descriptions of the Manuscripts The "Articella" in the Early Press, c. 1476-1534 Papers of the Articella Project Meeting, Cambr...
Article
Critical care medicine is a relatively recent development in the history of medical care. Intervention in the ICUs has significantly improved patient survival and defined a new level of quality of care to support organ system failure. Rehabilitation medicine is a form of health care with longer roots than intensive care. It focuses its efforts on e...
Article
Bulletin of the History of Medicine 71.2 (1997) 305-315 On a fine day in May 1933, Henry Sigerist set out on a quest. In his words, "there was no escape from the early Middle Ages for me, and . . . I would have to stick to the job, until the whole period was elucidated." During that summer, he began to create a catalog of all extant medical texts f...
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Bulletin of the History of Medicine 71.1 (1997) 144-146 Margaret R. Schleissner, ed. Manuscript Sources of Medieval Medicine: A Book of Essays. Garland Medieval Casebooks. New York: Garland Publishing, 1995. xii + 212 pp. $34.00. "To a medieval reader, books were not just texts; they were texts incarnated in unique, particular sequences and shapes"...
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Bulletin of the History of Medicine 71.1 (1997) 142-144 M. L. Cameron.Anglo-Saxon Medicine. Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England, no. 7. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. xii + 211 pp. $59.95. "Ringe man ir gebe on re man rincan ille nygan rian ond pater noster nigan fian." Anglo-Saxon medicine has been plagued by the impression left...
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Bulletin of the History of Medicine 70.1 (1996) 129 Agostino Paravicini Bagliani. Medicina e scienze della natura alla corte dei papi nel duecento. Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino, Biblioteca di Medioevo Latino, no. 4. Spoleto: Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1991. xvii + 488 pp. L 70,000 (paperbound). While tr...
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Bulletin of the History of Medicine 70.1 (1996) 127-128 Arnald of Villanova. Commentum in quasdam parabolas et alias aphorismorum series: Aphorismi particulares, aphorismi de memoria, aphorismi extravagantes. Edited with introductions by Juan A. Paniagua and Pedro Gil-Sotres and additions by L. García-Ballester and Eduard Feliu. Seminarium Historia...

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