Vonne van Polanen

Vonne van Polanen
KU Leuven | ku leuven · Department of Movement Sciences

PhD

About

48
Publications
3,241
Reads
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344
Citations
Citations since 2017
36 Research Items
261 Citations
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Introduction
In my research I am interested in the interaction between action and perception, especially in the context of hand movements and object manipulation. To do this, I use behavioural tasks such as grasping and lifting objects and psychophysics as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate which brain areas are involved in these processes.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - present
KU Leuven
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - present
KU Leuven
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2012 - June 2014
Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Full-text available
When lifting an object sequentially with the two hands, information about object weight can be transferred from one hand to the other. This information can be used to predictively scale fingertip forces and to form a perceptual estimation about the object’s weight. This study investigated how weight information can be transferred between the two ha...
Article
Fingertip force scaling during hand-object interactions typically relies on visual information about the object and sensorimotor memories from previous object interactions. Here, we investigated whether contextual information, that is not explicitly linked to the intrinsic object properties (e.g., size or weight) but is informative for motor contro...
Article
Full-text available
Sensory information about object properties, such as size or material, can be used to make an estimate of object weight and to generate an accurate motor plan to lift the object. When object properties change, the motor plan needs to be corrected based on the new information. The current study investigated whether such corrections could be made qui...
Preprint
Full-text available
When lifting an object sequentially with the two hands, information about object weight can be transferred from one hand to the other. This information can be used to predictively scale fingertip forces and to form a perceptual estimation about the object’s weight. This study investigated how weight information can be transferred between the two ha...
Preprint
Full-text available
During skilled hand-object interactions, the human sensorimotor system generates predictive motor commands based on visual information and sensorimotor memories established from previous experience. Here we investigated whether predictive force scaling could be adapted to context-dependent information that is not always explicitly available. We pro...
Article
Full-text available
When lifting an object skillfully, fingertip forces need to be carefully scaled to the object's weight, which can be inferred from its apparent size and material. This anticipatory force scaling ensures smooth and efficient lifting movements. However, even with accurate motor plans, weight perception can still be biased. In the size-weight illusion...
Preprint
Full-text available
Sensory information about object properties, such as size or material, can be used to make an estimate of object weight and to generate an accurate motor plan to lift the object. When object properties change, the motor plan needs to be corrected based on the new information. The current study investigated whether such corrections could be made qui...
Article
Full-text available
When grasping an object, the opening between the fingertips (grip aperture) scales with the size of the object. If an object changes in size, the grip aperture has to be corrected. In this study, it was investigated whether such corrections would influence the perceived size of objects. The grasping plan was manipulated with a preview of the object...
Article
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies showed that corticospinal excitability (CSE) is modulated during observation of object lifting, an effect termed ‘motor resonance’. Specifically, motor resonance is driven by movement features indicating object weight, such as object size or observed movement kinematics. We investigated in 16 humans (...
Preprint
Full-text available
When grasping an object, the opening between the fingertips (grip aperture) scales with the size of the object. If an object changes in size, the grip aperture has to be corrected. In this study, it was investigated whether such corrections would influence the perceived size of objects. The grasping plan was manipulated with a preview of the object...
Article
Observation of object lifting allows updating of internal object representations for object weight, in turn enabling accurate scaling of fingertip forces when lifting the same object. Here, we investigated whether lift observation also enables updating of internal representations for an object's weight distribution. We asked participants to lift an...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies showed that corticospinal excitability (CSE) is modulated during observation of object lifting, an effect termed ‘motor resonance’. Specifically, motor resonance is driven by movement features indicating object weight, such as object size or observed movement kinematics. We investigated in 16 humans (...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
When judging the heaviness of objects, the perceptual estimate can be influenced by the object’s density next to its mass. In the present study, we investigated whether density estimates might be similarly affected by object mass. Participants lifted objects of different sizes and masses in a virtual reality environment and estimated the density. W...
Article
Full-text available
Skillful object lifting relies on scaling fingertip forces according to the object's weight. When no visual cues about weight are available, force planning relies on recent lifting experience. Recently, we showed that previously lifted objects also affect weight estimation, as objects are perceived to be lighter when lifted after heavy objects comp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Observation of object lifting allows updating of internal object representations for object weight, in turn enabling accurate scaling of fingertip forces when lifting the same object. Here, we investigated whether lift observation also enables updating of internal representations for an object’s weight distribution. We asked participants to lift an...
Preprint
Full-text available
In skilled object lifting, fingertip forces need to be carefully scaled to object weight, which can be inferred from object properties, such as size or material. This anticipatory force scaling ensures smooth and efficient lifting movements. However, even with accurate motor plans, weight perception can still be biased. In the size-weight illusion,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Skillful object lifting relies on scaling fingertip forces according to the object’s weight. When no visual cues about weight are available, force planning relies on recent lifting experience. Recently, we showed that previously lifted objects also affect weight estimation, as objects are perceived to be lighter when lifted after heavy objects comp...
Article
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have highlighted that corticospinal excitability (CSE) is increased during observation of object lifting, an effect termed 'motor resonance'. This facilitation is driven by movement features indicative of object weight, such as object size or observed movement kinematics. Here, we investigated in 35 h...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have highlighted that corticospinal excitability (CSE) is increased during observation of object lifting, an effect termed ‘motor resonance’. This facilitation is driven by movement features indicative of object weight, such as object size or observed movement kinematics. Here, we investigated in 35 h...
Article
Full-text available
In the size-weight illusion, the smaller object from two equally weighted objects is typically judged as being heavier. One explanation is that the mismatch between the weight expectation based on object size and actual sensory feedback influences heaviness perception. In most studies, the size of an object is perceived before its weight. We invest...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the size-weight illusion, the smaller object from two equally weighted objects is typically perceived as being heavier. One explanation is that the mismatch between the weight expectation based on object size and actual sensory feedback influences heaviness perception. In most studies, the size of an object is perceived before its weight. We inv...
Article
To allow skilled object manipulation, the brain must generate a motor command specifically tailored to the object properties. For instance, in object lifting, the forces applied by the fingertips must be scaled to the object's weight. When lifting a series of objects, forces are usually scaled according to recent experience from previously lifted o...
Article
Full-text available
Lifting an object requires precise scaling of fingertip forces based on a prediction of object weight. At object contact, a series of tactile and visual events arise that need to be rapidly processed online to fine-tune the planned motor commands for lifting the object. The brain mechanisms underlying multisensory integration serially at transient...
Preprint
Full-text available
Lifting an object requires precise scaling of fingertip forces based on a prediction of object weight. At object contact, a series of tactile and visual events arise that need to be rapidly processed online to fine-tune the planned motor commands for lifting the object. The brain mechanisms underlying multisensory integration serially at transient...
Preprint
Full-text available
To allow skilled object manipulation, the brain must generate a motor command specifically tailored to the object properties. For instance, in object lifting, the forces applied by the fingertips must be scaled to the object’s weight. When lifting a series of objects, forces are usually scaled according to recent experience from previously lifted o...
Article
Full-text available
Affordances represent features of an object that trigger specific actions. Here we tested whether the presence and orientation of a handle on a cup could bias grasping movements towards it in conditions where subjects were explicitly told to ignore the handle. We quantified the grip aperture profile of twelve healthy participants instructed to gras...
Article
Full-text available
We can efficiently detect whether there is a rough object among a set of smooth objects using our sense of touch. We can also quickly determine the number of rough objects in our hand. In this study, we investigated whether the perceptual processing of rough and smooth objects is influenced if these objects are connected. In Experiment 1, participa...
Chapter
When hand motions in haptic exploration are investigated, the measurement methods used might actually restrict the movements or the perception. The perception might be reduced because the skin is covered, e.g. with a data glove. Also, the range of possible motions might be limited, e.g. by wired sensors. Here, a model of the hand is proposed that i...
Article
Full-text available
When lifting an object, the brain uses visual cues and an internal object representation to predict its weight and scale fingertip forces accordingly. Once available, tactile information is rapidly integrated to update the weight prediction and refine the internal object representation. If visual cues cannot be used to predict weight, force plannin...
Article
Full-text available
The two visual systems hypothesis suggests processing of visual information into two distinct routes in the brain: a dorsal stream for the control of actions and a ventral stream for the identification of objects. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that the dorsal and ventral streams are not strictly independent, but do interact with each othe...
Article
Full-text available
In a haptic search task, one has to detect the presence of a target among distractors using the sense of touch. A salient target can be detected faster than a non-salient target. However, little is known about the exploration strategies that are used, especially in 3D search tasks where items are held in the hand. In this study, we investigated whi...
Conference Paper
In this study, we have investigated which strategies were optimal in different haptic search tasks, where items were held in the hand. Blindfolded participants had to detect the presence of a target among distractors while using predetermined strategies. The optimal strategy was determined by considering reaction time and error data. In the search...
Article
Full-text available
In a haptic search task, one has to determine the presence of a target among distractors. It has been shown that if the target differs from the distractors in two properties, shape and texture, performance is better than in both single-property conditions (Van Polanen, Bergmann Tiest, & Kappers, 2013). The search for a smooth sphere among rough cub...
Article
Full-text available
In a search task, where one has to search for the presence of a target among distractors, the target is sometimes easily found, whereas in other searches it is much harder to find. The performance in a search task is influenced by the identity of the target, the identity of the distractors and the differences between the two. In this study, these f...
Article
Full-text available
In this study the saliency of hardness and softness were investigated in an active haptic search task. Two experiments were performed to explore these properties in different contexts. In Experiment 1, blindfolded participants had to grasp a bundle of spheres and determine the presence of a hard target among soft distractors or vice versa. If the d...
Presentation
Presentation at ECVP 2012. Abstract published in Perception (41), p. 66. Full paper available as: van Polanen, Vonne, Wouter M. Bergmann Tiest, and Astrid ML Kappers. ”Haptic search for hard and soft spheres.” PloS one 7.10 (2012): e45298. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0045298
Article
Full-text available
When, in visual and haptic search, a target is easily found among distractors, this is called a pop-out effect. The target feature is then believed to be salient, and the search is performed in a parallel way. We investigated this effect with movable stimuli in a haptic search task. The task was to find a movable ball among anchored distractors or...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined the effect of timing constraints and advance knowledge on eye-hand coordination strategy in a sequential pointing task. Participants were required to point at two successively appearing targets on a screen while the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) and the trial order were manipulated, such that timing constraints were high...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Movement strategies were investigated in a haptic search task where participants indicated whether a target was present among a varying number of items. Hand movements were classified according to two criteria into three movement types. Results indicated that an easy search was performed with a parallel strategy, while in a more difficult search a...

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