Vladimir Titorenko

Vladimir Titorenko
Concordia University Montreal · Department of Biology

Ph.D. (Genetics)

About

233
Publications
83,139
Reads
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10,335
Citations
Citations since 2016
58 Research Items
6828 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
201620172018201920202021202202004006008001,0001,200
Additional affiliations
October 1994 - December 2001
University of Alberta
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 1990 - September 1994
University of Groningen
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (233)
Article
Full-text available
We propose a hypothesis of a mechanism linking cellular aging to cellular quiescence in chronologically aging budding yeast. Our hypothesis posits that this mechanism integrates four different processes, all of which are initiated after yeast cells cultured in a medium initially containing glucose consume it. Quiescent cells that develop in these c...
Article
Full-text available
After budding yeast cells cultured in a nutrient-rich liquid medium with 0.2% glucose (under caloric restriction conditions) or 2% glucose (under non-caloric restriction conditions), ferment glucose to ethanol and then consume ethanol, they enter the stationary phase. The process of their chronological aging begins. At that point, the yeast culture...
Preprint
Full-text available
Withdrawal notice The authors have withdrawn their manuscript. The lipidomic data presented in the manuscript were based on an excel summary sheet provided by VIT, whose group (AP and KM) conducted the analysis using an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. However, after submitting to BioRxiv, the VIT group could not recover the RAW (primary source) files f...
Article
Full-text available
Caloric restriction and the tor1∆ mutation are robust geroprotectors in yeast and other eukaryotes. Lithocholic acid is a potent geroprotector in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we used liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method of non-targeted metabolomics to compare the effects of these three geroprotectors on the intracel...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Preprint
Full-text available
In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Preprint
Full-text available
the PDF can be download freely on pubmed. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33634751/
Cover Page
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In 2008, we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, this topic has received increasing attention, and many scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Thus, it is important to formulate on a regular basis updated guidelines for monit...
Article
Full-text available
We present a protocol for the identification and quantitation of major classes of water-soluble metabolites in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The described method is versatile, robust, and sensitive. It allows separating from each other structural isomers and stereoisomeric forms of water-soluble metabolites. ABSTRACT: Metabolomics is a method...
Article
Full-text available
After Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells cultured in a medium with glucose consume glucose, the sub-populations of quiescent and non-quiescent cells develop in the budding yeast culture. An age-related chronology of quiescent and non-quiescent yeast cells within this culture is discussed here. We also describe various hallmarks of quiescent and non-qui...
Article
Full-text available
In a quest for previously unknown geroprotective natural chemicals, we used a robust cell viability assay to search for commercially available plant extracts that can substantially prolong the chronological lifespan of budding yeast. Many of these plant extracts have been used in traditional Chinese and other herbal medicines or the Mediterranean a...
Article
Full-text available
Flaviviridae infections represent a major global health burden. By deciphering mechanistic aspects of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-host interactions, one could discover common strategy for inhibiting the replication of related flaviviruses. By elucidating the HCV interactome, we identified the 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 12 (HSD17B12) as a...
Article
Full-text available
Lipids are structurally diverse amphipathic molecules that are insoluble in water. Lipids are essential contributors to the organization and function of biological membranes, energy storage and production, cellular signaling, vesicular transport of proteins, organelle biogenesis, and regulated cell death. Because the budding yeast Saccharomyces cer...
Article
Full-text available
We have recently found that PE21, an extract from the white willow Salix alba, slows chronological aging and prolongs longevity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae more efficiently than any of the previously known pharmacological interventions. Here, we investigated mechanisms through which PE21 delays yeast chronological aging and extends yeast...
Book
Full-text available
Aging of unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic organisms is a convoluted biological phenomenon, which is manifested as an age-related functional decline caused by a progressive dysregulation of certain cellular and organismal processes. Many chronic diseases are associated with human aging. These aging-associated diseases include cardiovascular...
Article
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8 9 10 Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular and organismal aging and 11 aging-associated pathology has advanced greatly in recent years [1-5]. A body of evidence supports 12 the notion that these mechanisms have been conserved during evolution [6-10]. The significant 13 advances in knowledge about evolutionarily conserv...
Article
Full-text available
Cells of unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes can respond to certain environmental cues by arresting cell cycle and entering a reversible state of quiescence. Quiescent cells do not divide but can re-enter the cell cycle and resume proliferation if exposed to some signals from the environment. Quiescent cells in mammals and humans include adult...
Article
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Recent studies have revealed that some low-molecular weight molecules produced in mitochondria are essential contributing factors to aging and aging-associated pathologies in evolutionarily distant eukaryotes. These molecules are intermediates or products of certain metabolic reactions that are activated in mitochondria in response to specific chan...
Article
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We have recently discovered six plant extracts that delay yeast chronological aging. Most of them affect different nodes, edges and modules of an evolutionarily conserved network of longevity regulation that integrates certain signaling pathways and protein kinases; this network is also under control of such aging-delaying chemical compounds as spe...
Article
Full-text available
All presently known geroprotective chemical compounds of plant and microbial origin are caloric restriction mimetics because they can mimic the beneficial lifespan-and healthspan-extending effects of caloric restriction diets without the need to limit calorie supply. We have discovered a geroprotective chemical compound of mammalian origin, a bile...
Article
Full-text available
Aging of unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic organisms is a convoluted biological phenomenon, which is manifested as an age-related functional decline caused by a progressive dysregulation of certain cellular and organismal processes [1]. Many chronic diseases are associated with human aging. These aging-associated diseases include cardiovascu...
Article
Full-text available
Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultured in a nutrient-rich liquid medium initially containing 2% glucose as the sole carbon source are not limited in calorie supply. 1 When these cells consume glucose, they employ an intricate signaling network to elicit cell cycle arrest at the checkpoint START A in late G1, stimulate the diff...
Article
Full-text available
The concentrations of some key metabolic intermediates play essential roles in regulating longevity of the chronologically aging yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These key metabolites are detected by certain ligand-specific protein sensors that respond to concentration changes of the key metabolites by altering the efficiencies of longevity-defining...
Article
Full-text available
A dietary regimen of caloric restriction delays aging in evolutionarily distant eukaryotes, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we assessed how caloric restriction influences morphological, biochemical and cell biological properties of chronologically aging yeast advancing through different stages of the aging process. Our f...
Article
Full-text available
A disturbed homeostasis of cellular lipids and the resulting lipotoxicity are considered to be key contributors to many human pathologies, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been successfully used for uncovering molecular mechanisms through which impaire...
Article
Full-text available
Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing....
Article
Full-text available
Elucidating the biology of yeast in its full complexity has major implications for science, medicine and industry. One of the most critical processes determining yeast life and physiology is cellular demise. However, the investigation of yeast cell death is a relatively young field, and a widely accepted set of concepts and terms is still missing....
Article
Full-text available
The book Anti-aging Drugs: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice provides a comprehensive critical discussion of an increasingly debated (and gaining recent support) concept that chemical compounds capable of decelerating the inherently complex process of aging in humans can also delay the onset and/or progression of many chronic diseases associ...
Article
3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) and its synthetic halogenated derivatives 4,4'-Br2- and 7,7'-Cl2DIM (ring-DIMs) have recently been shown to induce protective autophagy in human prostate cancer cells. The mechanisms by which DIM and ring-DIMs induce autophagy have not been elucidated. As DIM is a mitochondrial ATP-synthase inhibitor, we hypothesized tha...
Article
Full-text available
A yeast culture grown in a nutrient-rich medium initially containing 2% glucose is not limited in calorie supply. When yeast cells cultured in this medium consume glucose, they undergo cell cycle arrest at a checkpoint in late G1 and differentiate into quiescent and non-quiescent cell populations. Studies of such differentiation have provided insig...
Article
Full-text available
Emergent evidence indicates that certain aspects of lipid synthesis, degradation and interorganellar transport play essential roles in modulating the pace of cellular aging in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The molecular mechanisms underlying the vital roles of lipid metabolism and transport in defining yeast longevity have begun to em...
Article
Full-text available
The functional state of mitochondria is vital to cellular and organismal aging in eukaryotes across phyla. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided evidence that age-related changes in some aspects of mitochondrial functionality can create certain molecular signals. These signals can then define the rate of cellular aging by alte...
Article
Full-text available
We have previously found that exogenously added lithocholic acid delays yeast chronological aging. We demonstrated that lithocholic acid enters the yeast cell, is sorted to mitochondria, resides in both mitochondrial membranes, changes the relative concentrations of different membrane phospholipids, triggers changes in the concentrations of many mi...
Article
Full-text available
A high‐throughput chemical genetic screen of chemical compounds from several commercial libraries has revealed that lithocholic bile acid (LCA), and some other bile acids, can slow yeast chronological aging [1]. The robust geroprotective effect of exogenously added LCA is due to its ability to enter chronologically aging yeast cells, be sorted to b...
Article
Full-text available
Exogenously added lithocholic bile acid and some other bile acids slow down yeast chronological aging by eliciting a hormetic stress response and altering mitochondrial functionality. Unlike animals, yeast cells do not synthesize bile acids. We therefore hypothesized that bile acids released into an ecosystem by animals may act as interspecies chem...
Article
Full-text available
Lithocholic acid (LCA) is a secondary bile acid that is selectively toxic to human neuroblastoma, breast and prostate cancer cells, whilst sparing normal cells. We previously reported that LCA inhibited cell viability and proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis of androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 human prostate cancer...
Data
Raw data for Figs. 1, 6, 7B, 11, 14 and 15
Article
Full-text available
We recently selected 3 long-lived mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a lasting exposure to exogenous lithocholic acid. Each mutant strain can maintain the extended chronological lifespan after numerous passages in medium without lithocholic acid. In this study, we used these long-lived yeast mutants for empirical verification of evolutio...
Article
Full-text available
Studies employing the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism have provided deep insights into molecular mechanisms of cellular and organismal aging in multicellular eukaryotes and have demonstrated that the main features of biological aging are evolutionarily conserved. Aging in S. cerevisiae is studied by measuring replicative...
Article
Full-text available
Our recent study has revealed six plant extracts that slow yeast chronological aging more efficiently than any chemical compound yet described. The rate of aging in yeast is controlled by an evolutionarily conserved network of integrated signaling pathways and protein kinases. Here, we assessed how single-gene-deletion mutations eliminating each of...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Organelle remodeling processes are evolutionarily conserved and involved in cell functions during development, aging, and cell death. Some endogenous and exogenous molecules can modulate these processes. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, has mainly been considered as a modulator of plasma membrane fluidi...
Article
Full-text available
We demonstrated that the geroprotective chemical compound LCA can delay the onset and slow the progression of chronological aging in yeast by causing an age-related remodeling of mitochondrial lipidome. Our findings revealed that such remodeling of mitochondrial lipidome alters mitochondrial morphology and functionality, thereby enabling mitochondr...
Article
Full-text available
We discovered six plant extracts that increase yeast chronological lifespan to a significantly greater extent than any of the presently known longevity-extending chemical compounds. One of these extracts is the most potent longevity-extending pharmacological intervention yet described. We show that each of the six plant extracts is a geroprotector...
Article
Full-text available
A recently conducted chemical genetic screen for pharmaceuticals that can extend longevity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has identified lithocholic acid as a potent anti-aging molecule. It was found that this hydrophobic bile acid is also a selective anti-tumor chemical compound; it kills different types of cultured cancer cells if used at...
Article
Full-text available
Cell-autonomous mechanisms underlying cellular and organismal aging in evolutionarily distant eukaryotes have been established; these mechanisms regulate longevity-defining processes within a single eukaryotic cell. Recent findings have provided valuable insight into cell-non-autonomous mechanisms modulating cellular and organismal aging in eukaryo...
Article
Full-text available
In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring au...