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Vladimir Shapovalov

Vladimir Shapovalov
Belgorod National Research University · Department of Russian History and Public Records Management

Doctor of Science (History)

About

6
Publications
420
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Featured research
Article
Full-text available
The article reveals the degree and character of the positive barin`s image in Russian vernacular tales. It is usually argued that a landlord as pictured in the vernacular tales is an antagonist of a peasant combining greed, stupidity, idleness and rigidity. One can hardly question this argument knowing the dominant behavior stereotypes of Russian landlords, for most of whom the peasants were basically animated objects. However, the social relations in the Russian village were more complex and multilayered, and it is also reflected in folklore, including vernacular tales. The landed gentry had different incomes, while their education, worldview and religiosity also varied. Therefore, barins` attitude towards their serfs differed as well: from inhuman cruelty to «paternal» virtue determined by the awareness that their prosperity depended on the well-being and loyalty of their serfs. Although rarely, there were also some barins who were sincere benefactors of their serfs. One can reveal this variety of attitudes in the vernacular tales. The positive moral characteristics of the gentry might be intertwined with the abovementioned negative ones. This highlights the complexity of perception of barin`s power by peasants. Thus, the vernacular tales is an important historical source to study the barin-muzhik relations in the Russian village, especially its socio-psychological aspect.
Article
Full-text available
Despite their ancient origin the folk riddles have been largely ignored by researchers as a potential historical source. The reason could be the absence in these texts of descriptions of large-scale historical events or social relations. Nonetheless the metaphoric correlation of the inanimate and the living nature objects with a landlord (barin), highlighted, from a peasant's point of view, some important behavioral stereotypes of the landlords. The analysis of riddles containing a 'barin' ('barynia') metaphor provided for a stratified approach to identification of a particular category of landlords implied in the riddles. The targeted social stratification of riddles with regard to the ruling classes off ered an opportunity to develop new approaches to the study of the peasantry's social psychology in the context of their relationships with various groups of the local nobility. The use of 'barin' ('barynia') metaphors in a number of riddles clearly demonstrated the existence of the noble dignity magic in the peasants' mind, as well as the worship of 'blue-blooded' class whose way of life was both incomprehensible and highly attractive to the peasants. All this reflected a rather complex and controversial nature of the social perception of the landlords' power by the peasantry, as well as the controversial nature of social antagonism in the Russian countryside, and thus made it possible to refer to the folk riddles as a valuable historical source.
Article
Full-text available
В статье проведен анализ народных пословиц и поговорок ХVII-ХIХ вв., содержащих в себе угрозы в адрес помещиков, в контексте исследования социопсихологического антагонизма в русской деревне. Содержание данных пословиц и поговорок отражает стремление крестьян разорвать «оковы» крепостничества, их надежды на лучшую долю, социальную справедливость. При этом четко просматривается желание крестьян свести счеты со свои-ми господами, даже если в недалеком будущем за это их будет ждать расплата. Часть пословиц-угроз, вероятно, появилась в разбойничьей среде. Пословицы и поговорки, содержащие угрозу в адрес помещиков, являются ценным самостоятельным источником для исследования эволюции социальной психологии русского крестьянства, особенно при изучении мотиваций агрессивного поведения крестьян в ходе антипомещичьих бунтов или разбойных нападений. The article offers an analysis of folk proverbs and sayings of the 17th–18th century containing threats against landlords in the context of the study of social and psychological antagonisms in the Russian countryside. The texts of these proverbs and sayings refl ected the peasants' desire to break the bonds of serfdom, their hopes for a better life and social justice. At the same time there was a clear indication of the peasants' hidden wish to get even with their landlords, even though in that case they would have incurred a severe punishment. Some of the threat-proverbs originated, apparently, among the robbers' gangs. Proverbs and sayings containing threats against landlords are a valuable independent source for the study of the social psychology evolution of Russian peasantry, particularly for the study of aggressive behavior motivation during the anti-landlord riots or plundering raids.
Article
Full-text available
The author considers the banditry of Martha Durova, a prominent landowner in Putivl` uezd, Sevsk province, Belgorod guberniia, in the context of social relations in the Russian-Ukrainian borderlands in the eigthteenth through the first half of the nineteenth century. The government ultimately sent military units to the “porubezhny krai” to secure her arrest. While noble banditry was certainly not unique to Belgorod and Kursk provinces, no other regions of Russia recorded violent, bloody noble banditry and an accompanying governmental military response on a similarly large scale during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The author identifies the tradition of “vol’nitsa” (brigands) in the Russian-Ukrainian borderlands, as well as the weakness and corruption of the Crown authorities in the former southwestern borderlands of the Russian state, as the major factors that shaped the Durova incident.
Book
Full-text available
The book examines various aspects of the gentry estates’ development in the Black Soil provinces from the 1850s through the 1890s. Special attention is given to gentry land ownership and land use, capitalist modernization of gentry estates, the role and place of landed gentry in local government and self-government, the transformation of daily life for gentry, and the socio-psychological adaptation of landed gentry. In addition, the author explores the figure of the Russian landlord in Russian folklore.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
The article reveals the degree and character of the positive barin`s image in Russian vernacular tales. It is usually argued that a landlord as pictured in the vernacular tales is an antagonist of a peasant combining greed, stupidity, idleness and rigidity. One can hardly question this argument knowing the dominant behavior stereotypes of Russian l...
Article
Full-text available
Despite their ancient origin the folk riddles have been largely ignored by researchers as a potential historical source. The reason could be the absence in these texts of descriptions of large-scale historical events or social relations. Nonetheless the metaphoric correlation of the inanimate and the living nature objects with a landlord (barin), h...
Article
Full-text available
В статье проведен анализ народных пословиц и поговорок ХVII-ХIХ вв., содержащих в себе угрозы в адрес помещиков, в контексте исследования социопсихологического антагонизма в русской деревне. Содержание данных пословиц и поговорок отражает стремление крестьян разорвать «оковы» крепостничества, их надежды на лучшую долю, социальную справедливость. Пр...
Article
Full-text available
The author considers the banditry of Martha Durova, a prominent landowner in Putivl` uezd, Sevsk province, Belgorod guberniia, in the context of social relations in the Russian-Ukrainian borderlands in the eigthteenth through the first half of the nineteenth century. The government ultimately sent military units to the “porubezhny krai” to secure h...
Book
Full-text available
The book examines various aspects of the gentry estates’ development in the Black Soil provinces from the 1850s through the 1890s. Special attention is given to gentry land ownership and land use, capitalist modernization of gentry estates, the role and place of landed gentry in local government and self-government, the transformation of daily life...

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
At this stage I focus on the Russian proverbs and sayings about landlords (barins) and muzhiks to see how they reflect social antagonisms in the Russian village in the late 19th though early 20th century.