Virginie M Stevens

Virginie M Stevens
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · USR 2936

PhD

About

79
Publications
26,743
Reads
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4,453
Citations
Citations since 2017
21 Research Items
2814 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - present
CNRS, Station d’Ecologie Expérimentale à Moulis
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (79)
Article
Full-text available
Odonata are biodiversity indicators that adequately represent many aquatic and semi-aquatic animal species. We recorded over two field seasons a rich lentic community of Odonata (18 species) in a large artificial freshwater reservoir (ca. 55 ha) built 40 years ago. The release of water from the dam in summer for crop irrigation leads to the desicca...
Article
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A few empirical examples document fixed alternative male mating strategies in animals. Here we focus on the polymorphism of male mating strategies in the ruff (Calidris pugnax, Aves Charadriiformes). In ruffs, three fixed alternative male mating strategies coexist and are signaled by extreme plumage polymorphism. We first present relevant data on t...
Preprint
Full-text available
A few empirical examples document fixed alternative male mating strategies in animals. Here we focus on the polymorphism of male mating strategies in the ruff (Calidris pugnax, Aves Charadriiformes). In ruffs, three fixed alternative male mating strategies coexist and are signaled by extreme plumage polymorphism. We first present relevant data on t...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how biological and environmental factors interactively shape the global distribution of plant and animal genetic diversity is fundamental to biodiversity conservation. Genetic diversity measured in local populations (GD P ) is correspondingly assumed representative for population fitness and eco-evolutionary dynamics. For 8356 populat...
Article
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Global biodiversity declines, largely driven by climate and land-use changes, urge the development of transparent guidelines for effective conservation strategies. Species distribution modeling (SDM) is a widely used approach for predicting potential shifts in species distributions, which can in turn support ecological conservation where environmen...
Article
Adaptive radiations occur mostly in response to environmental variation through the evolution of key innovations that allow emerging species to occupy new ecological niches. Such biological innovations may play a major role in niche divergence when emerging species are engaged in reciprocal ecological interactions. To demonstrate coevolution is a d...
Preprint
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Adaptive radiations occur mostly in response to environmental variation through the evolution of key eco-morphological innovations that allow emerging species to occupy new ecological niches. However, rapid phenotypic evolution and the evolution of key novelties are likely to also occur when a couple or few species are engaged into narrow ecologica...
Article
Aims Multiple environmental changes simultaneously altering the biotic and abiotic context of species are threatening communities and ecosystems worldwide. Exploration and mitigation of the eco‐evolutionary impacts of global change threats correspondingly are major components of conservation research, yet joint global change impacts remain poorly s...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation increasingly threatens the services provided by natural communities and ecosystem worldwide. An understanding of the eco‐evolutionary processes underlying fragmentation‐compromised communities in natural settings is lacking, yet critical to realistic and sustainable conservation. Through integrating the multivariate genetic, b...
Data
Appendix S1. Methods. Table S1. Examples of heritability (h 2) estimates in the reviewed studies. Table S2. Models of dispersal evolution and assumptions made on the genetic architecture of the evolving traits.
Poster
Full-text available
The ZA PYGAR project aims at studying the spatial dynamics of socio-ecological systems (SES) in South-Western France, going from the Pyrenees mountains to the plains of the Garonne river basin. PYGAR tries to answer three main scientific questions: 1/ What are the respective contributions of climate change and local anthropogenic disturbances to ec...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal is a process of central importance for the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of populations and communities, because of its diverse consequences for gene flow and demography. It is subject to evolutionary change, which begs the question, what is the genetic basis of this potentially complex trait? To address this question, we (i) revie...
Preprint
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation increasingly threatens the services provided by natural communities and ecosystem worldwide. An understanding of the underlying eco-evolutionary processes in natural settings is lacking, yet critical to realistic and sustainable conservation. Through integrating the multivariate genetic, biotic and abiotic facets of a natural...
Article
Full-text available
The existence of dispersal syndromes contrasting disperser from resident phenotypes within populations has been intensively documented across taxa. However, how such suites of phenotypic traits emerge and are maintained is largely unknown, although deciphering the processes shaping the evolution of dispersal phenotypes is a key in ecology and evolu...
Article
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Context: Anthropogenic activities readily result in the fragmentation of habitats such that species persistence increasingly depends on their ability to disperse. However, landscape features that enhance or limit individual dispersal are often poorly understood. Landscape genetics has recently provided innovative solutions to evaluate landscape res...
Article
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Dispersal is central in ecology and evolution because it influences population regulation, adaptation, and speciation. In many species, dispersal is different between genders, leading to sex-biased dispersal. Several theoretical hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolution of this bias: the resource competition hypothesis proposed by Gree...
Article
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A new framework in which the multiple levels of molecular variations contribute to phenotypic variations in a complex, nonlinear and interactive way, challenges the hierarchical nature of the relationships between the genotypic and phenotypic spaces. This individual-centered framework provides new insights on the evolutionary mechanisms involved in...
Article
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Describing, understanding and predicting the spatial distribution of genetic diversity is a central issue in biological sciences. In river landscapes, it is generally predicted that neutral genetic diversity should increase downstream, but there have been few attempts to test and validate this assumption across taxonomic groups. Moreover, it is sti...
Article
Conservation actions often focus on restoration or creation of natural areas designed to facilitate the movements of organisms among populations. To be efficient, these actions need to be based on reliable estimates or predictions of landscape connectivity. While circuit theory and least-cost paths (LCPs) are increasingly being used to estimate con...
Article
Dispersal, i.e. movements potentially leading to gene flow, is central in evolutionary ecology. Many factors can trigger dispersal, all linked to the social and/or the environmental context. Moreover, it is now widely demonstrated that phenotypes with contrasted dispersal abilities coexist within populations of a same species. The current challenge...
Article
Full-text available
In the current context of climate change and landscape fragmentation, efficient conservation strategies require the explicit consideration of life history traits. This is particularly true for amphibians, which are highly threatened worldwide, composed by more than 7400 species, which is constitute one of the most species-rich vertebrate groups. Th...
Data
Database for life history traits for European amphibians
Data
References cited in the database for life-history traits for European amphibians
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how dispersal movements are motivated and executed is the core business of dispersal evolutionary ecology, which is an active research field in environmental sciences. However, recent advances in dispersal research have not yet been confronted to the movement ecology paradigm (MEP) that was introduced to unify the study of all types o...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how dispersal movements are motivated and executed is the core business of dispersal evolutionary ecology, which is an active research field in environmental sciences. However, recent advances in dispersal research have not yet been confronted to the movement ecology paradigm (MEP) that was introduced to unify the study of all types o...
Article
Full-text available
Dispersal, the behaviour ensuring gene flow, tends to covary with a number of morphological, ecological and behavioural traits. While species-specific dispersal behaviours are the product of each species' unique evolutionary history, there may be distinct interspecific patterns of covariation between dispersal and other traits ('dispersal syndromes...
Article
Separating out the abiotic and biotic processes (such as limiting similarity or environmental filtering) from stochastic processes is central to developing a cogent approach for understanding patterns in ecological community structure and organization. Using butterfly communities in a fragmented landscape, we tested the hypothesis that local enviro...
Article
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Boloria eunomia is a boreo-montane butterfly species suffering from habitat loss and isolation in the relictual part of its distribution range. Small populations persist in habitats scattered on plateaux or low mountains in western, central and southern Europe. Quantifying gene flow within and between these remnant populations is thus a crucial poi...
Article
The Minimum Area Requirements (MAR) of species is a concept that explicitly addresses area and therefore can be highly relevant for conservation planning and policy. This study compiled a comprehensive database of MAR estimates from the literature, covering 216 terrestrial animal species from 80 studies. We obtained estimates from (a) Population Vi...
Article
Over the last decades, many species have been forced to track their shifting climate envelopes, and at the same time man-induced landscape fragmentation has led to the global decrease of natural habitat availability and connectivity. The interaction between these two co-occurring global environmental changes might have very strong effects on biodiv...
Article
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In semi-colonial species, some individuals choose to breed in isolation while others aggregate in breeding colonies. The origin and the maintenance of this pattern have been questioned, and inherited phenotype dependency of group breeding benefits has been invoked as one of the possible mechanisms for the evolution of semi-coloniality. Using field...
Article
Full-text available
The minimum area requirement (MAR) of a species is the amount of functional habitat necessary for population persistence. The accurate measurement of MAR in the field usually requires long and precise investigations of all resources used by the target organism. Here we tested if MAR could be predicted by body size and species-specific life-history...
Article
Dispersal is fundamental in determining biodiversity responses to rapid climate change, but recently acquired ecological and evolutionary knowledge is seldom accounted for in either predictive methods or conservation planning. We emphasise the accumulating evidence for direct and indirect impacts of climate change on dispersal. Additionally, evolut...
Article
Full-text available
Due to its impact on local adaptation, population functioning or range shifts, dispersal is considered a central process for population persistence and species evolution. However, measuring dispersal is complicated, which justifies the use of dispersal proxies. Although appealing, and despite its general relationship with dispersal, body size has h...
Data
Environmental factors at both macro-ecological and landscape scales are likely to affect (meta) population dynamics and species distributions, through direct or indirect effects on individual phenotypes. Although disentangling these scale effects is of prime importance in evolutionary ecology and conservation biology, most studies dealing with the...
Article
Full-text available
Connectivity is classically considered an emergent property of landscapes encapsulating individuals' flows across space. However, its operational use requires a precise understanding of why and how organisms disperse. Such movements, and hence landscape connectivity, will obviously vary according to both organism properties and landscape features....
Article
Full-text available
Landscape connectivity is a key process for the functioning and persistence of spatially-structured populations in fragmented landscapes. Butterflies are particularly sensitive to landscape change and are excellent model organisms to study landscape connectivity. Here, we infer functional connectivity from the assessment of the selection of differe...
Article
Parental effects can greatly affect offspring performance and are thus expected to impact population dynamics and evolutionary trajectories. Most studies have focused on maternal effects, whereas fathers are also likely to influence offspring phenotype, for instance when males transfer nutrients to females during mating. Moreover, although the sepa...
Article
1. One of the main drivers of the genesis and maintenance of biodiversity is mobility, i.e. the net result of the interaction between physiological performances (movement capacity) and behavioural decisions (movement decisions). Although several previous studies have found personality traits related to mobility, it is not yet clear whether mobility...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental factors at both macro-ecological and landscape scales are likely to affect (meta) population dynamics and species distributions, through direct or indirect effects on individual phenotypes. Although disentangling these scale effects is of prime importance in evolutionary ecology and conservation biology, most studies dealing with the...
Article
Full-text available
This article documents the addition of 139 microsatellite marker loci and 90 pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Aglaoctenus lagotis, Costus pulverulentus, Costus scaber, Culex pipiens, Dascyllus marginatus, Lupinus nanus Benth, Phloeo...
Data
Full-text available
This article documents the addition of 139 microsatellite marker loci and 90 pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Aglaoctenus lagotis, Costus pulverulentus, Costus scaber, Culex pipiens, Dascyllus marginatus, Lupinus nanus Benth, Phloeo...
Article
Parental effects can greatly affect offspring performance and are thus expected to impact population dynamics and evolutionary trajectories. Most studies have focused on maternal effects, whereas fathers are also likely to influence offspring phenotype, for instance when males transfer nutrients to females during mating. Moreover, although the sepa...
Article
Ecology Letters (2011) 14: 74–86 As dispersal plays a key role in gene flow among populations, its evolutionary dynamics under environmental changes is particularly important. The inter-dependency of dispersal with other life history traits may constrain dispersal evolution, and lead to the indirect selection of other traits as a by-product of this...
Article
Dispersal costs can be classified into energetic, time, risk and opportunity costs and may be levied directly or deferred during departure, transfer and settlement. They may equally be incurred during life stages before the actual dispersal event through investments in special morphologies. Because costs will eventually determine the performance of...
Article
Full-text available
Landscapes are often considered as islands of suitable habitat patches located in a hostile and homogeneous matrix. Variation in matrix quality, however, can be differently perceived by individuals, generating variation in movements related to external conditions (i.e., contrasted boundaries, corridors, or barriers) and/or individual phenotypes (i....
Article
This article documents the addition of 238 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Alytes dickhilleni, Arapaima gigas, Austropotamobius italicus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Cobitis lutheri, Dendroctonus ponderosae, Glossina morsitans morsitans, Haplophilus subterr...
Article
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Asbtract To what extent population structure favours the establishment of new phenotypes within a species remains a fundamental question in evolutionary studies. By reducing gene flow, habitat fragmentation is a major factor shaping the genetic structuring of populations, favouring isolation of small populations in which drift may rapidly change fr...
Article
A comprehensive mechanistic approach to dispersal requires the translation of the whole mobility register of the target organism into movement rules that could subsequently be used to model its displacements. According to the optimality paradigm, this procedure implies a cost–benefit analysis of mobility patterns taking into account not only moveme...
Article
Dispersal has recently gained much attention because of its crucial role in the conservation and evolution of species facing major environmental changes such as habitat loss and fragmentation, climate change, and their interactions. Butterflies have long been recognized as ideal model systems for the study of dispersal and a huge amount of data on...
Article
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Mounting evidence shows that contrasting selection pressures generate variability in dispersal patterns among individuals or populations of the same species, with potential impacts on both species dynamics and evolution. However, this variability is hardly considered in empirical works, where a single dispersal function is considered to adequately...
Article
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The symposium and workshop 'Organisms on the move: ecology and evolution of dispersal', held in Ghent (Belgium), 14-18 September 2009, brought together a wide range of researchers using empirical and modelling approaches to examine the dispersal process. This meeting provided an opportunity to assess how much cross-fertilization there has been betw...
Article
The natterjack toad (Bufo calamita) is endangered in several parts of its distribution, including Belgium, where it occurs mainly in artificial habitats. We parameterized a general model for natterjack population viability analysis (PVA) and tested its sensitivity to changes in the values of basic parameters. Then we assessed the relative efficienc...
Article
Full-text available
Like other pond-breeding amphibians, the natterjack toad (Bufo calamita) typically presents a patchy distribution. Because the species experiences high probabilities of local population extinction, its persistence within landscapes relies on both local and landscape-scale processes [dispersal allowing the (re)colonization of habitat patches]. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
Functional connectivity is a key factor for the persistence of many specialist species in fragmented landscapes. However, connectivity estimates have rarely been validated by the observation of dispersal movements. In this study, we estimated functional connectivity of a real landscape by modelling dispersal for the endangered natterjack toad (Bufo...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance assigned to inter-patch movements in fragmented systems, the structure of landscape between suitable habitat patches, the matrix, is often considered as to be of minor interest, or totally ignored. Consequently, models predicting metapopulation dynamics typically assume that dispersal and movement abilities are independent of...
Article
Full-text available
In a small, isolated population of the natterjack toad in southern Belgium, some features of demography and reproductive behaviour were atypical. Fecundity (about 2000 eggs per clutch) and adult survival rate (27%, compared with typical values of 50-80%) were both very low. Population age-structure was skewed towards young toad (2-4 years) and male...
Article
Full-text available
In their oecumenical tentative for unifying population concepts in marine and terrestrial environments, Camus and Lima (2002) question the current definition of population used by ecologists, on the basis of the dimensionless nature of the concept. Camus and Lima (2002) also claim that the metapopulation paradigm has introduced confusion, since the...