Virginia L. Harvey

Virginia L. Harvey
University of Chester | UC · Biological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy
Lecturer in Zoology at the University of Chester.

About

19
Publications
4,922
Reads
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211
Citations
Introduction
I am a zoologist who harnesses modern and archaeological data to capture how humans have impacted our planet through time and into the modern day. I specialise in analysing preserved proteins from modern and ancient tissues to unlock species identification, with a particular interest in fishes and other aquatic vertebrates.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - August 2021
The University of York
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • My project, "Investigating the survival of proteins in pots: Strategies for authentication and curation" explores protein extraction and analysis techniques to find ways of minimising sample destruction, whilst maximising protein yield.
January 2017 - June 2020
The University of Manchester
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2014 - present
The University of Manchester
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Multidisciplinary Approach to Pleistocene Cave Taphonomy, Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands).
Education
September 2014 - September 2016
The University of Manchester
Field of study
  • Palaeobiology
September 2004 - July 2007
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Zoology with Marine Zoology

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Bones of Pleuronectiformes (flatfish) are often not identified to species due to the lack of diagnostic features on bones that allow adequate distinction between taxa. This hinders in-depth understanding of archaeological fish assemblages and particularly flatfish fisheries throughout history. This is especially true for the North Sea region, where...
Article
Full-text available
Fish represent a key economic, social and ecological group of species that humans have exploited for tens of thousands of years. However, as many fish stocks are going into decline and with little known about the anthropogenic impacts on the health of the marine ecosystem pre-Industrial Revolution, understanding historical and archaeological exploi...
Article
Full-text available
Ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) are the largest and most diverse group of vertebrates, comprising over half of all living vertebrate species. Phylogenetic relationships between ray-finned fishes have historically pivoted on the study of morphology, which has notoriously failed to resolve higher order relationships, such as within the percomorphs...
Article
Full-text available
Denisova Cave, a Pleistocene site in the Altai Mountains of Russian Siberia, has yielded significant fossil and lithic evidence for the Pleistocene in Northern Asia. Abundant animal and human bones have been discovered at the site, however, these tend to be highly fragmented, necessitating new approaches to identifying important hominin and faunal...
Article
Full-text available
Isotope analyses are some of the most common analytical methods applied to ancient bone, aiding the interpretation of past diets and chronology. For this, the evaluation of "collagen yield" (as defined in radiocarbon dating and stable isotope research) is a routine step that allows for the selection of specimens that are deemed adequate for subsequ...
Article
Full-text available
Decay experiments have the potential to provide useful analogues in the interpretation of archaeological remains. Previous studies have focused on how physical properties or processing methods can influence fish bone distributions within archaeological sites. However, the means by which intrinsic chemical properties of fish bone, such as baseline c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Ancient biomolecule analyses are proving increasingly useful in the study of evolutionary patterns, including extinct organisms. Proteomic sequencing techniques complement genomic approaches, having the potential to examine lineages further back in time than achievable using ancient DNA, given the less stringent preservation requirements. In this s...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient biomolecule analyses are proving increasingly useful in the study of evolutionary patterns, including extinct organisms. Proteomic sequencing techniques complement genomic approaches, having the potential to examine lineages further back in time than achievable using ancient DNA, given the less stringent preservation requirements. In this s...
Article
Full-text available
Billfish from the families Xiphiidae (swordfish) and Istiophoridae (marlins and sailfish) are large, often pelagic fishes that are highly migratory. Although some billfish have been the target of global commercial and sport fisheries for decades, prehistoric billfish foraging is relatively rare, but includes systematic swordfish (Xiphias gladius) a...
Article
Full-text available
Advancements in molecular science are continually improving our knowledge of marine turtle biology and evolution. However, there are still considerable gaps in our understanding, such as past marine turtle distributions, which can benefit from advanced zooarchaeological analyses. Here, we apply collagen fingerprinting to 130 archaeological marine t...
Article
Full-text available
Advancements in molecular science are continually improving our knowledge of marine turtle biology and evolution. However, there are still considerable gaps in our understanding, such as past marine turtle distributions, which can benefit from advanced zooarchaeological analyses. Here, we apply collagen fingerprinting to 130 archaeological marine t...
Article
Full-text available
Cayman Brac (Cayman Islands) lies within the Caribbean Islands Biodiversity Hotspot, an epicenter of high biodiversity and endemism. However, all endemic terrestrial mammals on the Cayman Islands are now extinct, following post-1500 AD human colonization of the islands. Introduced rodents and domesticated mammals now exclusively represent this face...
Article
Trace element inventories are known to correlate with specific histological structures in bone, reflecting organismal physiology and life histories. By studying trace elements in fossilised bone, particularly in individuals with cyclic bone growth (alternating fast/slow bone deposition), we can improve our understanding of the physiology of extinct...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient bone remains are widely utilized when investigating vertebrate biodiversity of past animal populations but are often so highly fragmented that the majority of specimens cannot be identified to any meaningful taxonomic level. Recently, high-throughput methods for objective species identification using collagen peptide mass fingerprinting hav...
Article
Full-text available
Collagen is the dominant organic component of bone and is intimately locked within the hydroxyapatite structure of this ubiquitous biomaterial that dominates archaeological and palaeontological assemblages. Radiocarbon analysis of extracted collagen is one of the most common approaches to dating bone from late Pleistocene or Holocene deposits, but...
Data
MALDI peptide mass fingerprints of the collagen extracted from radiocarbon-dated specimens following digestion with trypsin. (DOCX)

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
To use collagen fingerprinting as a method of recovering ancient fisheries data. This work showcases the technique as: (1) proficient in identifying ancient fish remains to species level; (2) able to uncover incongruences in morphological identification; (3) carrying the capacity to complement modern fisheries data, rewrite baselines, expose past species distributions, and inform decision makers and modern management.