Virginia Driscoll

Virginia Driscoll
East Carolina University | ECU · School of Music

Doctor of Philosophy

About

34
Publications
8,557
Reads
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698
Citations
Citations since 2017
12 Research Items
430 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor of Music Therapy who teaches undergraduate coursework in music therapy and conducts research with adults and children who have cochlear implants, hearing loss, and normal hearing. My interests are in re/habilitation of music perception through online training and co-treatment of speech-language delays of children with hearing loss through music therapy. I previously worked as a research specialist for Drs Kate Gfeller and Dr. Karen Iler Kirk.
Additional affiliations
August 2016 - May 2019
University of Iowa
Position
  • Graduate teaching assistant
Description
  • Supervise undergraduate & graduate-equivalency music therapy students in their clinical placements. Reviewing session plans, assessments, goals & objectives, student reflections, assignments for clinical placement, & provide clinical feedback.
August 2016 - May 2019
University of Iowa
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Practicum
Description
  • Co-teaching 2 sections of Music Therapy Foundations classes with focus on developing music skills and clinical applications of music therapy.
August 2015 - December 2015
University of Iowa
Position
  • Graduate Teaching Practicum
Description
  • Co-teaching with tenured professor in music therapy practicum classroom in which students learn the process of referral, assessment, goals and objectives, data collection, and creation of session plans.
Education
January 2015 - December 2019
University of Iowa
Field of study
  • Music Education, concentration Music Therapy
August 2004 - December 2006
University of Iowa
Field of study
  • Music Therapy

Publications

Publications (34)
Poster
Full-text available
This poster is about the normal hearing, high frequency hearing and relative pitch perception of pianists and vocalists and the differences between them. These results will determine if a particular group is more inclined to noise related hearing loss or if a particular group is better at the interpretation of sound and perception of pitch.
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine the traditional and extended high-frequency (EHF) hearing of musicians and non-musicians, comparing hearing levels between left and right ears within- and between-groups to determine if perception of those extended high frequencies can be linked to instrument or instrument-family
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dialect and masker condition on speech recognition in noise performance. The subjects were divided into Southern or non-Southern dialect groups. Speech recognition in noise ability was evaluated using the adult AzBio sentences in four different maskers. No main effect for dialect group was...
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this poster is to provide a look into the experiences of four educators of CI recipients as they attempted to create situations where both teacher and student had successful interactions. We were interested in teachers’ previous knowledge before they began working with these students with CIs, what resources they used, if any, as wel...
Presentation
Introduction: Successful music perception continues to be a challenge for cochlear implant (CI) recipients. This study presents the second phase of a sequential exploratory mixed methods study involving experiences and desires of CI recipients in complex listening experiences involving music. New developments with electroacoustic, or hybrid, hearin...
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships across speech-in-noise measures and Grammar Mixed Test results.
Poster
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to examine the differences between musician and non-musician participants’ speech recognition skills in various maskers. Musician and non-musician participants completed an online protocol that included the AzBio sentence lists paired with noise and music backgrounds. Results showed that musical experience did not prov...
Poster
Full-text available
The main objective of this study was to investigate speech recognition in noise performances across listener dialect groups. The participants completed an online dialect quiz that determined the geographical location of their dialect. Speech perception in noise was evaluated using AzBio sentence lists presented in five types of background noise. It...
Presentation
It is well documented in music therapy literature that older adults benefit from music therapy. While literature exists in the music therapy area regarding adaptive lessons for young children, there are scant resources available for providing similar instruction for older adults. This presentation discusses providing adaptive lessons as music thera...
Article
Full-text available
Background Cochlear implants (CIs), which have been designed primarily to support spoken communication of persons with severe to profound hearing loss, are highly effective in supporting speech perception in quiet listening conditions. CI users as a group achieve significantly poorer perception and appraisal of music, and speech perception is compr...
Article
Background: Music engagement (the active making of music, e.g., music lessons and ensembles) is a common part of educational and community experiences. Music making typically involves listening to and production of rapidly changing combinations of pitch, timbre, and rhythm, which can be challenging for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, given that...
Article
Objective: Evidence suggests that musicians, as a group, have superior frequency resolution abilities when compared to non-musicians. It is possible to assess auditory discrimination using either behavioral or electrophysiologic methods. The purpose of this study was to determine if the auditory change complex (ACC) is sensitive enough to reflect t...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: Preserved residual hearing in adult recipients of short electrode cochlear implants (CIs) contributes to improve perception of speech in noise as well as music. Recently, children and adolescents with sufficient low-frequency hearing but profound loss at higher frequencies enrolled in a FDA trial intended to evaluate the benefit of a sh...
Article
Objective This paper provides a preliminary report of a music-based training program for adult cochlear implant (CI) recipients. Included in this report are descriptions of the rationale for music-based training, factors influencing program development, and the resulting program components. Methods Prior studies describing experience-based plastici...
Article
Objective Children with cochlear implants (CIs) participate in musical activities in school and daily lives. Considerable variability exists regarding the amount of music involvement and enjoyment. Using the Music Engagement Questionnaire-Preschool/Elementary (MEQ-P/E), we wanted to determine patterns of musical participation and the impact of fami...
Article
Full-text available
Effective musical communication requires conveyance of the intended message in a manner perceptible to the receiver. Communication disorders that impair transmitting or decoding of structural features of music (e.g., pitch, timbre) and/or symbolic representation may result in atypical musical communication, which can have a negative impact on music...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: The objectives were to evaluate the relationships among music perception, appraisal, and experience in cochlear implant users in multiple clinical settings and to examine the viability of two assessments designed for clinical use. Design: Background questionnaires (IMBQ) were administered by audiologists in 14 clinics in the United S...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Cochlear implant (CI) users have difficulty perceiving some intonation cues in speech and melodic contours because of poor frequency selectivity in the cochlear implant signal. Objectives: To assess perceptual accuracy of normal hearing (NH) children and pediatric CI users on speech intonation (prosody), melodic contour, and pitch ra...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined speech recognition abilities of cochlear implant (CI) recipients in the spectrally complex listening condition of 3 contrasting types of background music, and compared performance based upon listener groups: CI recipients using conventional long-electrode devices, Hybrid CI recipients (acoustic plus electric stimulation), and no...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, there has been increasing interest in music perception of cochlear implant (CI) recipients and a growing body of research conducted in this area. The majority of these studies have examined perceptual accuracy for pitch, rhythm, and timbre. Another important, but less commonly studied aspect of music listening is appreciation, or a...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the efficiency and effectiveness of three types of training on recognition of musical instruments by adults with cochlear implants (CI). Seventy-one adults with CIs were randomly assigned to one of three training conditions: feedback on response accuracy, feedback-plus (response accuracy plus correct answer), and direct instruct...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this study was to examine the musical engagement (participation and attitude) of pediatric CI recipients who were implanted during early childhood and who have reached age 15 or older. A questionnaire was administered to a group of 31 prelingually deaf CI users who receive annual follow up services and assessment in a clinical resear...
Article
Full-text available
Cochlear implants (CI) are effective in transmitting salient features of speech, especially in quiet, but current CI technology is not well suited in transmission of key musical structures (e.g., melody, timbre). It is possible, however, that sung lyrics, which are commonly heard in real-world music may provide acoustical cues that support better m...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides research and clinical information relevant to music therapy for preschool children who use cochlear implants (CI). It consolidates information from various disciplinary sources regarding (a) cochlear implantation of young prelingually deaf children (~age 2–5), (b) patterns of auditory and speech-language development, and (c) res...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aim: To compare accuracy of prelingually deaf adolescents and postlingually deaf adult CI users on detection of pitch errors in commonly-heard melodies. This examines normalization of interval sizes in Western musical scales. Material & Methods: Adolescent and adult CI users were tested on detection of pitch change errors (2, 4 semitones) in 2 co...
Conference Paper
Aim: To provide information regarding the use of music-based therapy to enhance communication skills of preschool cochlear implant recipients in a group settings. Therapy goals include improved sound discrimination, recognition, comprehension, as well as speech production and language development. Material and Methods: In collaboration with speec...
Article
Full-text available
An extensive body of literature indicates that cochlear implants (CIs) are effective in supporting speech perception of persons with severe to profound hearing losses who do not benefit to any great extent from conventional hearing aids. Adult CI recipients tend to show significant improvement in speech perception within 3 mo following implantation...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study examines the effects of 3 types of instrumental accompaniments (piano, guitar, piano + guitar) and contrasting CI groups (long electrode-LE; bilateral long electrode-Bilat; long electrode + hearing aid-LE+HA; short electrode with acoustic + electric stimulation-SE) on recognition of song lyrics sung by a male or female vocalist. The test...
Article
Full-text available
The simulation of the CI (cochlear implant) signal presents a degraded representation of each musical instrument, which makes recognition difficult. To examine the efficiency and effectiveness of three types of training on recognition of musical instruments as presented through simulations of the sounds transmitted through a CI. Participants were r...
Article
Full-text available
The research examined whether performance by adult cochlear implant recipients on a variety of recognition and appraisal tests derived from real-world music could be predicted from technological, demographic, and life experience variables, as well as speech recognition scores. A representative sample of 209 adults implanted between 1985 and 2006 pa...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Sequential exploratory mixed methods study, using patient-centered outcomes approach to evaluate experiences of CI recipients in complex listening environments, their perceptions of success, and desires for improvement.