Virginia Conde

Virginia Conde
University of Oslo · Department of Psychology

Dr. rer. med.

About

38
Publications
8,713
Reads
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969
Citations
Introduction
My main research interest is to explore human neuroplasticity mechanisms, with a particular focus on plasticity modulators that are specific to the human species. I am interested in both healthy neuronal plasticity and plasticity subserving pathological states such as during recovery from brain trauma. I probe and study neuronal plasticity by means of non-invasive brain stimulation in combination with neuroimaging techniques.
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - present
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Fellow
January 2015 - July 2017
Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • 2-year Individual Postdoctoral grant awarded by the Medical Sciences section of the Danish Council for Independent Research (http://ufm.dk/en/research-and-innovation/funding-programmes-for-research-and-innovation).
August 2013 - December 2014
Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Interleaved Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroencephalography in the study of Disorders of Consciousness.
Education
October 2009 - November 2013
University of Leipzig, Faculty of Medicine
Field of study
  • Biomedicine
September 2008 - January 2009
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Liberal Arts and Sciences
September 2003 - March 2009
Universidad de Sevilla
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
The fragile X syndrome is a mutation-driven developmental disorder caused by a repetition over 200 times of the CGG trinucleotide situated in the 5' untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1). The interval between 55 to 199 CGG repeats, which is over the normal range but below full mutation, is named fragile X premutation...
Article
Full-text available
Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has been proposed as one of the key mechanisms underlying learning and memory. Repetitive median nerve stimulation (MNS) followed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), defined as paired associative stimulation (PAS), has been used as an in vivo model of ST...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) excites populations of neurons in the stimulated cortex, and the resulting activation may spread to connected brain regions. The distributed cortical response can be recorded with electroencephalography (EEG). Since TMS also stimulates peripheral sensory and motor axons and generates a loud "click" sound, the...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered one of the most pervasive causes of disability in people under the age of 45. TBI often results in disorders of consciousness, and clinical assessment of the state of consciousness in these patients is challenging due to the lack of behavioural responsiveness. Functional neuroimaging offers a...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI) is one of the key mechanisms leading to impaired consciousness after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition, preferential regional expression of TAI in the brain may also influence clinical outcome. Aim: We addressed the question whether the regional expression of microstructural changes...
Article
Full-text available
The global burden of mortality and morbidity caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, and the heterogeneity of TBI patients and the relatively small sample sizes of most current neuroimaging studies is a major challenge for scientific advances and clinical translation. The ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis)...
Chapter
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major clinical and economic challenge for health systems worldwide, and it is considered one of the leading causes of disability in young adults. The recent development of brain-computer interface (BCI) tools to target cognitive and motor impairments has led to the exploration of these techniques as potenti...
Article
Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) produces shearing forces on long-range axons and brain vessels, causing axonal and vascular injury. To examine whether microbleeds and axonal injury co-localize after TBI, we performed whole-brain susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in 14 patients during the subacute phase aft...
Preprint
Full-text available
The global burden of mortality and morbidity caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant and the heterogeneity of TBI patients and the relatively small sample sizes of most current neuroimaging studies is a major challenge for scientific advances and clinical translation. The ENIGMA (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis)...
Preprint
Full-text available
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) excites populations of neurons in the stimulated cortex, and the resulting activation may spread to connected brain regions. The distributed cortical response can be recorded with electroencephalography (EEG). Since TMS also stimulates peripheral sensory and motor axons and generates a loud click sound, the T...
Article
Introduction Focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) induces somatosensory input due to excitation of peripheral trigeminal nerve branches as well as auditory input caused by the loud click produced during stimulus discharge. In a recent study, we have demonstrated that these peripheral sources of cortical activation make a strong contributio...
Article
Objectives Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is capable to non-invasively stimulate the human cortex. Electroencephalography (EEG) can record the cortical response evoked by TMS (TEPs), which are a summation of the brain responses to the TMS-induced electric field in the cortex, and to the multisensory peripheral stimulation derived from the...
Conference Paper
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) can effectively stimulate non-invasively the human cortex. The TMS-evoked cortical response can be recorded with electroencephalography (EEG). However, TMS also stimulates our senses by stimulating peripheral trigeminal nerve fibers and creating a loud click. This implies that the TMS-evoked EEG response not...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term musical expertise has been shown to be associated with a number of functional and structural brain changes, making it an attractive model for investigating use-dependent plasticity in humans. Physiological interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) as examined by transcranial magnetic stimulation has been shown to be correlated with anatomical pro...
Article
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates cortical excitability thereby influencing behavior and learning. While previous studies focused on tDCS after-effects, limited information about "online" tDCS effects is available. This in turn is an important prerequisite to better characterize and/or optimize tDCS effects. Here, we aimed to...
Article
Full-text available
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique capable of modulating cortical excitability and thereby influencing behavior and learning. Recent evidence suggests that bilateral tDCS over both primary sensorimotor cortices (SM1) yields more prominent effects on motor performance in both healthy subjects...
Article
Full-text available
An efficient and fast auditory-motor network is a basic resource for trained musicians due to the importance of motor anticipation of sound production in musical performance. When playing an instrument, motor performance always goes along with the production of sounds and the integration between both modalities plays an essential role in the course...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term motor skill learning has been consistently shown to result in functional as well as structural changes in the adult human brain. However, the effect of short learning periods on brain structure is not well understood. In the present study, subjects performed a sequential pinch force task (SPFT) for 20 min on 5 consecutive days. Changes in...
Article
Background: Non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to modulate cortical excitability and thereby influencing motor behaviour and learning. Hypothesis: While there is increasing knowledge about the importance of the primary motor cortex (M1) in short- and long-term motor skill learning...
Article
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique capable of modulating cortical excitability and thereby influencing behavior and learning. Recent evidence suggests that bilateral tDCS over both primary sensorimotor cortices (SM1) yields more prominent effects on motor performance in both healthy subjects...
Article
Full-text available
Repeated application of paired-pulse TMS over the primary motor cortex (M1) in human subjects with an inter-pulse interval (IPI) of 1.5 ms (iTMS(1.5 ms)) has been shown to significantly increase paired-pulse MEP (ppMEP) amplitudes during the stimulation period and increased single-pulse MEP amplitudes for up to 10 minutes after termination of iTMS....

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
To explore the relationship between global and local functional connectivity and cognitive performance in patients with moderate to severe TBI.
Project
To understand the mechanisms subserving network plasticity at the systems level of the living human brain by means of non-invasive brain stimulation.
Project
Prospective longitudinal study in patients recovering from a closed-head traumatic injury.