Vincent Porcher

Vincent Porcher
Autonomous University of Barcelona | UAB · Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technologies (ICTA)

Ph.D student in ethnobiology (ICTA - IRD)

About

12
Publications
1,986
Reads
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20
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
20 Citations
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Introduction
(M.Sc. in Tropical Botany and Ethnoecology, 2017, University of Montpellier and AgroParisTech and M.Eng. in Agronomy in Southern Countries, 2017, Agrocampus-Ouest and University of Curitiba) is a Predoctoral Research Fellow of the LICCI team at ICTA-UAB. He will focus his Ph.D. on the ethnoecological knowledge of children in Madagascar in the context of global change. His work aims to understand how children’s knowledge and know-how can contribute to the livelihood strategies of their own society in the face of climate change.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
As an Indigenous community of Algeria and the broader Sahel, the Tuareg hold unique ecological knowledge, which might contribute to broader models of place-based climate change impacts. Between January and April 2019, we carried out semi-structured interviews (N=23) and focus group discussions (N=3) in five villages of the province of Illizi, Alger...
Article
Full-text available
The use of wild edible plants and mushrooms can help to counteract the homogenisation of diets and decreasing resilience of food systems. We performed a systematic review to consolidate information about perceptions of wild edible plant and mushroom changes from the perspective of local communities. We found that 92% of all perceived changes of wil...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding local knowledge about wild edible plants (WEP) is essential for assessing plant services, reducing the risks of knowledge extinction, recognizing the rights of local communities, and improving biodiversity conservation efforts. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends to be under-represented in local e...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Understanding local knowledge about wild edible plants (WEP) is essential for assessing plant services, reducing the risks of knowledge extinction, recognizing the rights of local communities, and improving biodiversity conservation efforts. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends to be under-represented in local e...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Current climate change is responsible for the greatest food scarcity ever known in the extreme south of Madagascar. Knowledge of wild edible plants has never been so crucial in this area to limit the food risk. Consequently, there is an urgent need to document this knowledge. However, the knowledge of specific groups such as women or children tends...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The local perception of climate change and the process that leads IPLCs to their adaptation strategy is still unknown. However, this is crucial to grasp local responses, stakes and predict future trends. To fill this gap, we worked with Betsileo peoples (Madagascar), a group of farmers deeply impacted by seasonal shifts. We adopted a holistic appro...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Alors que les enfants représentent plus de 40% des populations vivant sous les tropiques, ils sont les laissés pour compte de la recherche, notamment en ethnoécologie. Pour appréhender le monde, il est essentiel de tenir compte du rôle et de la place des enfants dans les interactions société-nature. En effet, ceux-ci détiennent des connaissances et...
Article
The low natural regeneration of the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in the Madre de Dios region of Peru is a major concern for the conservation and sustainable use of this species which sustains one of the cornerstone non-timber forest product economies in Amazonia. The Brazil nut is a gap-dependent, long-lived pioneer species that has been shown...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
How do arid conditions and rare resources influence local ecological knowledge e.i, structures, adaptation and distribution within small-scale societies? Do we know any specific trends?

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Children have long been marginalized in ethnoecological research on traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and representations of nature. Few tools or resources exist to address the children'ʹs world in ethnoecology. Nonetheless, many questions and themes, especially around the production and transmission of TEK, concern children. Children build their own traditions and skills, which shape both their own cultural productions and those of adults. Children’s TEK consequently should be considered alongside that of adults in ethnoecological research. Children are both producers and repositories of ecological knowledge and societal values. They mobilize these in an autonomous manner to interact with their environment in order to improve their living conditions, conduct experiments, and adjust to a changing world. This project aims to reconsider children’s TEK, analyse and discuss the practical and heuristic interest of a new tool in ethnoecology: children’s drawings.
Project
LICCI is an ERC funded project that aims to bring insights from indigenous and local knowledge to climate research. People with a long history of interaction with the environment have developed complex knowledge systems that allow them to detect local impacts of climatic variability, but these insights are absent in climate change research and policy fora. The LICCI project will bring insights from local knowledge to climate research by 1) providing data on local climate change impacts on physical (e.g., shrinking glaciers) and biological systems (e.g., phenological changes) and on perceptions of climate change impacts on socioeconomic systems (e.g., crop failure due to rainfall patterns change) and 2) testing hypotheses on the global spatial, socioeconomic and demographic distribution of local climate change impacts indicators. The LICCI project started in June 2018 and will end in May 2023.
Project
Seedling identification is essential for monitoring and studying recruitment. But in many families such as the lecythidaceae, real identification tools are often lacking in seedlings. This work, based on several months of fieldwork and the crossing of herbarium data, aims to produce an effective tool to recognize Bertholletia excelsa among other seedlings of Lecythidaceae.