Vincent Hoogerheide

Vincent Hoogerheide
Utrecht University | UU · Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences

Dr.

About

38
Publications
16,665
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801
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2015 - present
Utrecht University
Position
  • PhD Student
March 2012 - September 2015
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Research suggests some sequences of examples and problems (i.e., EE, EP) are more effective (higher test performance) and efficient (attained with equal/less mental effort) than others (PP, sometimes also PE). Recent findings suggest this is due to motivational variables (i.e., self‐efficacy), but did not test this during the training phase. Moreov...
Article
Full-text available
Decades of research has shown that example‐based learning is an effective instructional strategy for learning new skills. The field of learning from examples is seeing a shift in focus towards more innovative and use‐inspired research, in part because the use of examples for informal and formal learning purposes has mushroomed. This special issue c...
Article
Full-text available
A central factor in research guided by the Cognitive Load Theory (CLT) is the mental effort people invest in performing a task. Mental effort is commonly assessed by asking people to report their effort throughout performing, learning, or problem-solving tasks. Although this measurement is considered reliable and valid in CLT research, metacognitiv...
Article
Research has demonstrated that oral explaining to a fictitious student improves learning. Whether these findings replicate, when students are writing explanations, and whether instructional explaining is more effective than other explaining strategies, such as self-explaining, is unclear. In two experiments, we compared written instructional explai...
Article
Full-text available
Teaching the contents of study materials by providing explanations to fellow students can be a beneficial instructional activity. A learning-by-teaching effect can also occur when students provide explanations to a real, remote, or even fictitious audience that cannot be interacted with. It is unclear, however, which underlying mechanisms drive lea...
Article
Full-text available
Background As a result of the COVID‐19 pandemic, many teachers found themselves making a rapid and often challenging shift from in‐person classroom teaching to teaching in an online environment. As teachers continue to learn about working in this new environment, research in cognitive and learning sciences, specifically findings from cognitive load...
Article
Full-text available
Presenting novices with examples and problems is an effective and efficient way to acquire new problem-solving skills. Nowadays, examples and problems are increasingly presented in computer-based learning environments, in which learners often have to self-regulate their learning (i.e., choose what type of task to work on and when). Yet, it is quest...
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, students often practice problem-solving skills in online learning environments with the help of examples and problems. This requires them to self-regulate their learning. It is questionable how novices self-regulate their learning from examples and problems and whether they need support. The present study investigated the open questions (...
Poster
Full-text available
Poster based upon paper: Sepp, S., Wong, M., Hoogerheide, V., Castro-Alonso, J.C.(2021) Shifting Online: 12 Tips for Online Teaching Derived from Contemporary Educational Psychology Research. Manuscript submitted for publication.
Preprint
Previous research has shown that explaining is an effective activity to enhance learning. In prior studies, students were instructed to explain the contents after completing an entire learning phase. Explaining at the end of a learning phase, however, may be less apt to support comprehension monitoring and subsequent regulation activities. In two e...
Preprint
Research demonstrated that oral explaining to a fictitious student improves learning. Whether these findings replicate in written contexts, and whether instructional explaining is more effective than other explaining strategies such as self-explaining is unclear. In two experiments, we compared written instructional explaining to written self-expla...
Article
Full-text available
Problem-solving tasks form the backbone of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) curricula. Yet, how to improve self-monitoring and self-regulation when learning to solve problems has received relatively little attention in the self-regulated learning literature (as compared with, for instance, learning lists of items or learning...
Article
Full-text available
An exponential increase in the availability of information over the last two decades has asked for novel theoretical frameworks to examine how students optimally learn under these new learning conditions, given the limitations of human processing ability. In this special issue and in the current editorial introduction, we argue that such a novel th...
Article
Two experiments investigated the effects of an instructional video’s setting on learners’ retention and application of the video content. Experiment 1 explored competing hypotheses based on theoretical assumptions about whether an authentic setting would serve as a distraction or as a cue for the instructor’s expertise. Participants (N⫽ 59) watched...
Article
Research with adolescent and university students has shown that after studying a text, teaching its content to a fictitious peer on camera fosters learning compared to restudying. We investigated the effects of generating a teaching video during homework in a sample of primary school students (N = 131) in comparison to restudying and summarizing. S...
Article
Full-text available
Example-based learning (i.e., studying examples to learn a problem-solution procedure, often alternated with solving practice problems) leads to better learning outcomes than solving practice problems only, and video examples are increasingly being used in online and blended learning environments. Recent findings show that the presentation order of...
Article
Teachers often recommend their students to generate test questions and answers as a means of preparing for an exam. There is a paucity of research on the effects of this instructional strategy. Two recent studies showed positive effects of generating test questions relative to restudy, but these studies did not control for time on task. Moreover, t...
Article
Recent research has shown that example study only (EE) and example-problem pairs (EP) were more effective (i.e., higher test performance) and efficient (i.e., attained with less effort invested in learning and/or test tasks) than problem-example pairs (PE) and problem solving only (PP). We conducted two experiments to investigate how different exam...
Article
Recent findings show that after studying a text, teaching the learned content on video to a fictitious peer student improves learning more than restudying the content. This benefit may be in part due to increased arousal associated with the teaching activity. The present experiment investigated whether teaching on video is also effective for acquir...
Article
This special issue contains 7 empirical papers and 2 commentaries based on the EARLI SIG 6 (Instructional Design) and 7 (Technology-Enhanced Learning and Instruction) conference organized at the University of Burgundy, Dijon, France in 2016. All papers focus on learning with instructional video, a topic that continues to arouse an important interes...
Presentation
Full-text available
In this junior keynote speech, I present our work on how design aspects of video modeling examples affect students' learning and self-efficacy and whether and why creating a video example (predominantly learning-by-teaching on video) is an effective instructional strategy for learning.
Article
In video modeling examples, a human model demonstrates and explains how to perform a task. The model-observer similarity (MOS) hypothesis predicts that learners who perceive themselves to be more similar to the model will learn more from the examples and show greater self-efficacy gains. Findings have been mixed, however; possibly because perceptio...
Article
Full-text available
The retrospective evaluation of an event tends to be based on how the experience felt during the most intense moment and the last moment. Two experiments tested whether this so-called peak-end effect influences how primary school students are affected by peer assessments. In both experiments, children (ages 7 to 12) assessed two classmates on their...
Article
The present study tests whether presenting video modeling examples from the learner’s (first-person) perspective promotes learning of an assembly task, compared to presenting video examples from a third-person perspective. Across 2 experiments conducted in different labs, university students viewed a video showing how to assemble an 8-component cir...
Article
Example-based learning is a very effective and efficient instructional strategy for novices. It can be implemented using text-based worked examples that provide a written demonstration of how to perform a task, or (video) modelling examples in which an instructor (the ‘model’) provides a demonstration. The model-observer similarity (MOS) hypothesis...
Thesis
Full-text available
My dissertation for obtaining my doctorate that I will defend October 20th. Comprises research on the effects of observing demonstration videos (should the person be visible in the video or not? Does it matter who the person in the video is?) and of creating video modeling examples (effects of explaining in front of a camera).
Poster
Full-text available
Reporting the results of three papers on the model-observer similarity hypothesis.
Article
Two experiments investigated whether studying a text with an explanation intention and then actually explaining it to (fictitious) other students in writing, would yield the same benefits as previously found for explaining on video. Experiment 1 had participants first studying a text either with the intention to explain it to others or to complete...
Article
Full-text available
Online learning from video modeling examples, in which a human model demonstrates and explains how to perform a learning task, is an effective instructional method that is increasingly used nowadays. However, model characteristics such as gender tend to differ across videos, and the model-observer similarity hypothesis suggests that such characteri...
Article
Full-text available
Four experiments investigated whether the testing effect also applies to the acquisition of problem-solving skills from worked examples. Experiment 1 (n = 120) showed no beneficial effects of testing consisting of isomorphic problem solving or example recall on final test performance, which consisted of isomorphic problem solving, compared to conti...
Article
Example-based learning is an effective instructional strategy for students with low prior knowledge, and is increasingly being used in online learning environments. However, examples can take many different forms and little is known about whether and how form affects learning outcomes. Therefore, this study investigated whether worked examples and...
Article
Two experiments investigated whether acting as a peer model for a video-based modeling example, which entails studying a text with the intention to explain it to others and then actually explaining it on video, would foster learning and transfer. In both experiments, novices were instructed to study a text, either with the intention of being able t...
Article
Full-text available
The negative thoughts that anxious children experience while sitting for an exam consume working memory resources at the cost of resources for performing on the exam. In a randomized field experiment (N = 117) with primary school students, we investigated the hypothesis that stimulating students to look through the problems of a math test before th...
Article
Retrospective evaluation of the pain or pleasure associated with past episodes (i.e. remembered utility) is mainly determined by how the episodes felt when they were at their peak, and when they ended (Kahneman, Fredrickson, Schreiber, & Redelmeier, 1993). Two experiments were conducted to investigate whether this memory bias known as the peak-end...
Article
Full-text available
Observationeel leren, dat wil zeggen, leren door te kijken naar het goede voorbeeld van anderen, is een natuurlijke manier van leren die jonge kinderen spontaan gebruiken. Alles zelf door eigen ervaring moeten leren zou niet alleen zeer tijdrovend maar vaak ook gevaarlijk zijn. Gelukkig kunnen we leren van het goede voorbeeld van anderen. Observati...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I particularly hope to find research on what happens if you elaborate on factual content (e.g. a fact or a concept) on long-term retention. Imagine if I have to remember a definition of what an earthquake is (concept) or a year in which a major earthquake took place (fact), what would elaborating on this do to my memory relative to less active processing strategies such as restudy?
Question
Hi Everyone,
I was hoping to make an argument that when people are older, they are perceived as more of an expert. For instance in a comparison between peer students and older people. Any ideas?
Kind regards,
Vincent

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
Investigate whether we can sequence learning experiences in such a way that learning improves
Project
My second main research line concerns learning by generating an instructional video (cf. ‘teaching on video). Although teachers increasingly often instruct their students to learn by creating a video and students use this strategy spontaneously in their free time, not much is known about the conditions under which generating a video is (most) effective and why. My (laboratory) research has shown that creating a teaching video for a fictitious peer improves learning compared to restudy with a range of different learning material and student populations. I also showed that teaching in writing is not an effective strategy for learning and hypothesized that this might be due to feelings of social presence during teaching, so the degree to which learners feel that they are teaching an actual audience.