Vincent Hare

Vincent Hare
University of Cape Town | UCT · Stable Light Isotope Laboratory

DPhil (Oxon)

About

19
Publications
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188
Citations
Introduction
Vincent is originally from Cape Town, South Africa, and holds degrees in both Physics and Archaeological Science, from the Universities of Cape Town (BSc) and Oxford (MSc, DPhil), where he was Clarendon Scholar. He is fascinated by novel applications of physics to the study of the Earth and its history, with broad interests in dating methods, isotope chronology, and palaeoclimatology.

Publications

Publications (19)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Current global geomagnetic field models suffer from strong bias towards Northern Hemisphere data. Absolute intensity measurements from the Southern Hemisphere are key to understanding the evolution of the field over the historical era, especially recent strengthening of non-dipole contributions, and the appearance of the South Atlantic Magnetic Ano...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate and precise dating methods are of central importance to archaeology, palaeontology and earth science. This paper investigates the expected precision and age range of rehydroxylation dating, a recently proposed technique for fired clays. An expression for combined measurement uncertainty is presented, which takes into account all significan...
Article
Full-text available
Fired clay minerals rehydroxylate after firing, a phenomenon that causes the long-term mass gain and expansion seen in archaeological ceramics. During rehydroxylation, fired clay minerals react with H2O to form structural hydroxyl (OH). Recent models propose that rehydroxylation is described by a quartic root (t 1/4) time dependence, which has led...
Article
For most of the Phanerozoic Eon, Earth’s woody vegetation has been dominated by C3 plants – predominantly gymnosperms - with angiosperms only emerging as the dominant plant group as CO2 declined during the Cenozoic (66 Ma onward). At present, differences in carbon isotope discrimination (∆13C) between angiosperm and gymnosperm plants are relatively...
Article
The Pleistocene ungulate communities from the western coastal plains of South Africa's Cape Floristic Region (CFR) are diverse and dominated by grazers, in contrast to the region's Holocene and historical faunas, which are relatively species-poor and dominated by small-bodied browsers and mixed feeders. An expansion of grassy habitats is clearly im...
Article
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Atmospheric aridity and drought both influence physiological function in plant leaves, but their relative contributions to changes in the ratio of leaf‐internal to ambient partial pressure of CO2 (χ) – an index of adjustments in both stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rate to environmental conditions – are difficult to disentangle. Many stomat...
Article
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We measured δ¹³Cenamel and δ¹⁸Oenamel in 213 archaeological bovid teeth from Nelson Bay Cave (NBC), spanning the last 22 ka. We also recorded dental mesowear (occlusal relief [high versus low] and cusp shape [sharp, round, or blunt]) of all maxillary first and second molars from NBC. We use these values to explore glacial/interglacial shifts in bov...
Article
The relationship between ungulate stable carbon isotope values and environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity, precipitation) remains poorly understood. In this paper, we evaluate this relationship for, predominantly, C3 ecosystems in the winter rainfall areas of southern Africa. In our dataset (290 individuals representing 23 species)...
Article
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The extraction and study of organic residues from ceramics has been a subject of interest for the last 50 years in archaeology and archaeological science. Lipids are among the best-preserved organic substances in archaeological contexts and can provide information about the diets of ancient populations, as well as past environments. Here, we presen...
Article
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The paucity of Southern Hemisphere archeomagnetic data limits the resolution of paleosecular variation models. At the same time, important changes in the modern and historical field, including the recent dipole decay, appear to originate in this region. Here a new directional record from southern Africa is presented from analysis of Iron Age (ca. 4...
Article
Full-text available
The 13 C/ 12 C ratio of C 3 plant matter is thought to be controlled by the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO 2 and stomatal response to environmental conditions, particularly mean annual precipitation (MAP). The effect of CO 2 concentration on 13 C/ 12 C ratios is currently debated, yet crucial to reconstructing ancient environments and quant...

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